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Mel Kiper and Todd McShay on 2017 NFL Draft

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  • Mel Kiper and Todd McShay on 2017 NFL Draft

    Kiper's Top 10 prospects at each position for 2017 NFL draft

    My preseason Big Board for the 2017 NFL draft is up, but I know many of you want to go well beyond 25 names. So here's a couple hundred more, broken down by position.

    Important to note: This is a mix of seniors and underclassmen, but early on I separate the two so you see more senior players, as those are guys who are certain to be in the draft. By "underclassmen," I mean players who technically could return to school for another season. Those are true juniors and third-year sophomores. I've denoted the third-year sophomores with asterisks.

    Quarterbacks

    Seniors
    1. C.J. Beathard, Iowa
    2. Mitch Leidner, Minnesota
    3. Chad Kelly, Mississippi
    4. Davis Webb, California
    5. Seth Russell, Baylor


    Underclassmen
    1. Deshaun Watson, Clemson
    2. Brad Kaaya, Miami (Fla.)
    3. Mason Rudolph, Oklahoma State
    4. Luke Falk, Washington State
    5. Mitch Trubisky, North Carolina

    Russell, Falk, and Trubisky are the new additions here. Webb is already off to a great start after his transfer to Cal. He threw for 441 yards and four touchdowns in the win over Hawaii in Australia. Beathard offers a lot of intrigue, as he has impressive physical tools but you want to see him stretch the field a bit and show what kind of arm he has.

    Running backs

    Seniors
    1. Kareem Hunt, Toledo
    2. Corey Clement, Wisconsin
    3. Elijah McGuire, Louisiana-Lafayette
    4. Justin Davis, USC
    5. Donnel Pumphrey, San Diego State

    Underclassmen
    1. Leonard Fournette, LSU
    2. Dalvin Cook, Florida State
    3. Christian McCaffrey, Stanford
    4. Nick Chubb, Georgia
    5. Royce Freeman, Oregon

    The junior class here is pretty exciting. When your No. 5 guy packs 230 pounds and had sneaky Heisman-like numbers last year, it's a reminder that the production is everywhere. The No. 1 thing to watch for with all of them: health. It's just a reality that it will determine so much. If you haven't seen Hunt, dial up some MACtion during the week this year.

    Fullbacks

    Seniors
    1. Sam Rogers, Virginia Tech
    2. Freddie Stevenson, Florida State
    3. Jaymar Parrish, Pitt
    4. Nate Iese, UCLA
    5. Prescott Line, Michigan State

    Underclassmen
    1. Daniel Marx, Stanford
    2. Chris Herndon, Miami (Fla.)
    3. Jaylen Samuels, NC State
    4. Dimitri Flowers, Oklahoma
    5. J.D. Moore, LSU

    What we're seeing with a lot of these fullbacks is they can catch the ball. Rogers is an example, as he has the classic fullback bowling-ball build (5-foot-11, 230 pounds), but he also has 48 career receptions and will get a bunch more. Wide receivers

    Seniors
    1. Jehu Chesson, Michigan
    2. Corey Davis, Western Michigan
    3. Travin Dural, LSU
    4. Mack Hollins, North Carolina
    5. Cooper Kupp, Eastern Washington

    Underclassmen
    1. JuJu Smith-Schuster, USC
    2. Mike Williams, Clemson
    3. Malachi Dupre, LSU
    4. Ricky Seals-Jones, Texas A&M
    5. Travis Rudolph, Florida State

    A lot of raw physical talent and production here. Smith-Schuster is explosive in his movements but also plays with strength at the catch point. Williams has length and hands, but he'll run by you. Dupree is a natural who needs more accurate targets. Seals-Jones has a huge frame -- 6-5 and nearly 240 pounds. Chesson will need to be useful this year for the Michigan passing game.

    Tight ends

    Seniors
    1. O.J. Howard, Alabama
    2. Jake Butt, Michigan
    3. Jordan Leggett, Clemson
    4. Jeremy Sprinkle, Arkansas
    5. Evan Engram, Mississippi

    Underclassmen
    1. Bucky Hodges, Virginia Tech
    2. Brandon Lingen, Minnesota
    3. DeAndre Goolsby, Florida
    4. Cam Serigne, Wake Forest
    5. Jeb Blazevich, Georgia

    Howard has a big name based on his pedigree coming into Bama and some freshman flashes, but until he blew up against Clemson (often uncovered for some reason) in the title game the statistics were underwhelming. Butt was reliable and showed off strong hands and the ability to get down the field. Jim Harbaugh likes his tight ends.

    Offensive tackles

    Seniors
    1. Adam Bisnowaty, Pitt
    2. Chad Wheeler, USC
    3. Avery Gennesy, Texas A&M
    4. Conor McDermott, UCLA
    5. Zach Banner, USC

    Underclassmen
    1. Cam Robinson, Alabama
    2. Roderick Johnson, Florida State
    3. Mike McGlinchey, Notre Dame
    4. Tyrell Crosby, Oregon
    5. **Orlando Brown, Oklahoma

    Robinson already has a lot of experience as he enters his junior season. Overall, the underclassmen need to have a year where elite measurables and athleticism are paired with consistency. That's not a new theme. Bisnowaty has flown under the radar some, but he now has three seasons of starts at left tackle and has a real shot to stay there at the next level.

    Offensive guards

    Seniors
    1. Dan Feeney, Indiana
    2. Dorian Johnson, Pitt
    3. Greg Pyke, Georgia
    4. Caleb Peterson, North Carolina
    5. Johnny Caspers, Stanford

    Underclassmen
    1. **Quenton Nelson, Notre Dame
    2. Tyrone Crowder, Clemson
    3. Billy Price, Ohio State
    4. Damien Mama, USC
    5. Brian Allen, Michigan State

    With the underclassmen in particular, in each case the guy is a linchpin along the offensive line. Price, for instance, is one of just a few returning starters for the Buckeyes on the offensive side of the ball. Nelson can flat out take defenders where they don't want to go. A powerful player.

    Centers

    Seniors
    1. Ethan Pocic, LSU
    2. Pat Elflein, Ohio State
    3. Jon Toth, Kentucky
    4. Tyler Orlosky, West Virginia
    5. Cameron Tom, So. Mississippi

    Underclassmen
    1. Sean Welsh, Iowa
    2. Mason Cole, Michigan
    3. Nick Linder, Miami (Fla)
    4. Austin Schlottmann, TCU
    5. Toa Lobendahn, USC

    Welsh is the latest in the production line at Iowa. Not often that a junior has already played in 27 games. Cole is a critical player for a Michigan offense that has to run the ball effectively.

    Defensive ends

    Seniors
    1. Jonathan Allen, Alabama
    2. Dawuane Smoot, Illinois
    3. Deatrich Wise Jr., Arkansas
    4. Isaac Rochell, Notre Dame
    5. DeMarcus Walker, Florida State

    Underclassmen
    1. Myles Garrett, Texas A&M
    2. Charles Harris, Missouri
    3. Carl Lawson, Auburn
    4. Derek Barnett, Tennessee
    5. Tyquan Lewis, Ohio State

    Garrett is the biggest name here, and pass rushing from this position could again be a strength in the draft class. Garrett has 23 sacks in two seasons. I felt Allen was an almost certain first-rounder had he entered the draft last season, and is a luxury returner for Nick Saban this year. Bama will be scary at times up front.

    Defensive tackles

    Seniors
    1. Carlos Watkins, Clemson
    2. Chris Wormley, Michigan
    3. Jarron Jones, Notre Dame
    4. Tanzel Smart, Tulane
    5. Jaleel Johnson, Iowa

    Underclassmen
    1. Malik McDowell, Michigan State
    2. Charles Walker, Oklahoma
    3. Caleb Brantley, Florida
    4. Davon Godchaux, LSU
    5. Lowell Lotulelei, Utah

    Not a bunch of big names here, but a lot of talent. McDowell is the one top-10 name on my current Big Board, a mix of length and explosiveness that can be overwhelming for any blocker who doesn't have some assistance. Wormley was a force for the Wolverines last year and getting him back is big for that defense.

    Inside linebackers

    Seniors
    1. Reuben Foster, Alabama
    2. Kendell Beckwith, LSU
    3. Keith Kelsey, Louisville
    4. Hardy Nickerson, Illinois
    5. Richie Brown, Mississippi State

    Underclassmen
    1. Raekwon McMillan, Ohio State
    2. Anthony Walker, Northwestern
    3. Zach Cunningham, Vanderbilt
    4. Nyles Morgan, Notre Dame
    5. Josey Jewell, Iowa

    The Buckeyes have been loaded over the past couple years (any of you catch the 2016 draft?) and even then McMillan was able to work his way into the starting group as a freshman and sophomore. That says a lot. Jewell is a player who really emerged last season -- he shows great instincts and is constantly around the ball.

    Outside linebackers

    Seniors
    1. Tim Williams, Alabama
    2. Devonte Fields, Louisville
    3. Jarrad Davis, Florida
    4. Jalen Reeves-Maybin, Tennessee
    5. Josh Carraway, TCU

    Underclassmen
    1. Marquis Haynes, Mississippi
    2. Elijah Lee, Kansas State
    3. Dante Booker, Ohio State
    4. Lorenzo Carter, Georgia
    5. Taylor Young, Baylor

    Williams is another Bama defender who could have entered the draft with a first-round grade, but he also comes back trying to show he's more than a situational player. He was in only about 20 percent of defensive snaps last season. Haynes has some special pass-rushing skills, but a sprinter's frame. Last year he played around 220 pounds.

    Cornerbacks

    Seniors
    1. Desmond King, Iowa
    2. Tre'Davious White, LSU
    3. Cordrea Tankersley, Clemson
    4. Jourdan Lewis, Michigan
    5. Cole Luke, Notre Dame

    Underclassmen
    1. Teez Tabor, Florida
    2. **Marlon Humphrey, Alabama
    3. Sidney Jones, Washington
    4. Jordan Thomas, Oklahoma
    5. Adoree' Jackson, USC

    The senior class here is particularly impressive; you can make a case for a few of these guys as first- or second-round picks had they entered the 2016 draft. Jones is the sleeper to watch among the underclassmen, as he has been quietly putting on a show for the Huskies and will be under more scouting scrutiny this season.

    Safeties

    Seniors
    1. Marcus Maye, Florida
    2. Chidobe Awuzie, Colorado
    3. Eddie Jackson, Alabama
    4. Josh Harvey-Clemons, Louisville
    5. Tony Conner, Mississippi

    Underclassmen
    1. Jamal Adams, LSU
    2. **Jabrill Peppers, Michigan
    3. Marcus Williams, Utah
    4. Dominick Sanders, Georgia
    5. Budda Baker, Washington

    The physicality really stands out here. Both Adams and Peppers can cover in space but also essentially become an extra linebacker. The modern safety has to be a Swiss Army Knife, and you see plenty of that with this group.

    Kickers

    Seniors
    1. Jake Elliott, Memphis
    2. Bobby Puyol, Connecticut
    3. Conrad Ukropina, Stanford
    4. Andy Phillips, Utah
    5. Nick Weiler, North Carolina

    Underclassmen
    1. Matthew McCrane, Kansas State
    2. Daniel Carlson, Auburn
    3. Michael Badgley, Miami (Fla)
    4. Joey Slye, Virginia Tech
    5. Aidan Schneider, Oregon

    McCrane is an impressive 25-for-26 on field goal attempts over his first two seasons, though he was just 7-for-7 last year due to an injury. Another season like his freshman campaign (18-for-19) will keep him in this spot heading to his senior year.

    Punters

    Seniors
    1. Dalton Schomp, Florida Atlantic
    2. Hayden Hunt, Colorado State
    3. Justin Vogel, Miami (Fla)
    4. Austin Rehkow, Idaho
    5. Rigoberto Sanchez, Hawaii

    Underclassmen
    1. Johnny Townsend, Florida
    2. Joe Davidson, Bowling Green
    3. JK Scott, Alabama
    4. Trevor Daniel, Tennessee
    5. Will Gleeson, Mississippi

    Schomp led the nation last season with an average of 48 yards per punt. That would play on Sundays.
    In 2016 Brock Osweiler was rated last (32nd) among all QBs (>400 attempts) by ProFootballFocus and ranked 33rd/34 QBs (>200 attempts) by Football Outsiders.

  • #2
    Quarterbacks
    Seniors

    2. Mitch Leidner, Minnesota
    So far of who I've seen Leidner looks interesting to me.
    In 2016 Brock Osweiler was rated last (32nd) among all QBs (>400 attempts) by ProFootballFocus and ranked 33rd/34 QBs (>200 attempts) by Football Outsiders.

    Comment


    • #3
      Are there any franchise-changing QBs in 2017 NFL draft?

      Todd McShayESPN Senior Writer
      We've seen at least two quarterbacks selected in the first round of every draft over the past 10 years, with the exception of 2013 when there was just one (EJ Manuel, a true stunner). In fact, to find the last time a QB didn't go in Round 1, you have to go back to 1996.

      How about in 2017? We'll know more in the coming months. With plenty of teams in the market for a QB, let's break this year's class into tiers and figure out how the talent compares to previous groups I've studied.


      Tier 1: Talented but raw

      Based on what we've seen to date, I wouldn't take any of these guys in Round 1 but believe they belong on Day 2.

      Deshaun Watson, Clemson: Watson is a tough evaluation because he's really good in so many areas. Adequate size. Great athlete. Great temperament. Mobile. Good arm strength. But I haven't seen him be consistently accurate on the intermediate-to-deep throws you need to make at the next level. This season, I was expecting him to build on his performance down the stretch last season, but that just hasn't happened. One scout I talked to gave Watson a midround grade. We're in the mid-second-round range right now. I like that he seems to play his best when the game is on the line, but I need to see better timing, touch and accuracy on throws downfield.

      Brad Kaaya, Miami (Fla.): Kaaya has been put in a tough spot this season, playing behind a really shaky offensive line. He has taken an absolute beating, and I think he has probably gotten into some bad habits mechanically because of his protection issues. Kaaya will be more reliant than other guys in this class on finding the right system. He's a good fit for a West Coast scheme. But he won't be for everyone because he doesn't have the arm strength to play in certain windy-weather locales. Kaaya will need to add bulk and get stronger before he can be handed the keys to a franchise. I'd like to see him return to school and get another year of experience playing in a pro-style system.

      DeShone Kizer, Notre Dame: Kizer might have the best upside of anyone in this class. He has great intelligence and physical ability. But he struggles with accuracy inside the pocket and makes his fair share of mistakes. The last time we saw him, Kizer was struggling against Stanford and being benched by coach Brian Kelly. Kizer's confidence has gone south, and unless we see a major reversal in his play, I'd suggest he return to school to get more experience. Tier 2: The lottery tickets

      These guys might never be starters, but they have some impressive tools. Middle rounds is where we have them graded right now.

      Luke Falk, Washington State: Falk has flashed the ability to make full-field reads. And he shows good anticipation and accuracy. But he comes from a system that has never produced a QB with sustained success in the NFL.

      Chad Kelly, Ole Miss: Kelly plays with a gunslinger's mentality, which can be both good and bad. He can wow you with his physical tools and then show poor decision-making. Ole Miss' system features a lot of half-field reads and quick screens, which will make his transition tougher. I worry about his maturity too.

      C.J. Beathard, Iowa: Beathard might have the best chance of anyone in this tier to have success in the NFL. He has an elite work ethic and plays in a pro-style system. Similar to Kaaya, he has developed some bad habits this season as his O-line has surprisingly struggled, but I love his intangibles. Tier 3 The wild cards

      Check back with me in a few months on these guys.

      Mitch Trubisky, North Carolina: I'll be perfectly candid: I have not studied tape on Trubisky. He wasn't on our radar over the summer, having thrown just 125 passes in his prior seasons, but he's the only guy in this class who I've gotten positive feedback on from scouts. With a 71.2 completion percentage and an 18-to-2 TD-INT ratio, Trubisky has had a true breakout season. He could be moving up my board soon.

      Davis Webb, Cal: Webb has good size and a big arm. He's throwing the ball all over the yard in Cal's Air Raid attack (51.7 attempts per game), and his numbers reflect that. Webb has some upside, but as we've seen with Jared Goff so far this season, it's not easy to transition from that spread attack to the NFL.


      Final thoughts

      This is as bad a quarterback class as I can remember. Supply never seems to meet demand when it comes to quarterbacks in the draft, but we could be looking at an extreme case this year.

      As it stands now, I don't see a single franchise savior in the group. That has to concern teams like the Browns, Bears, 49ers and Jets, who could all be in the market for a quarterback in the first round.

      This could change, of course, as I watch more tape (particularly on Trubisky) and as guys continue to develop. But right now, I wouldn't feel comfortable taking any of these quarterbacks in Round 1.
      In 2016 Brock Osweiler was rated last (32nd) among all QBs (>400 attempts) by ProFootballFocus and ranked 33rd/34 QBs (>200 attempts) by Football Outsiders.

      Comment


      • #4
        I think Chad Kelly will be probably the best QB from this class. If he's there when we pick I'd take him.

        Comment


        • #5
          McShay's Top 32: Dalvin Cook living up to the hype
          Todd McShayESPN Senior Writer
          Here, we'll look at which players have moved up and down our Top 32, drawing on the same scouting reports as before and making changes only where necessary.
          We'll continue to update our board as we get closer to the 2017 NFL draft. While it's a given that some players will move into the rankings and others will drop out, this provides a good snapshot of which players currently have the most NFL potential based on our evaluations.
          Note: Underclassmen are marked with an asterisk.

          1. Leonard Fournette, RB, LSU*
          Grade: 95
          A nagging ankle injury has forced Fournette to sit out three of LSU's past five games, but his short-term health hasn't threatened his standing atop my rankings. After logging 513 total touches in his previous two seasons, Fournette has little left to prove to NFL scouts. He has a rare combination of size, power, agility and speed for the position. I love Fournette's angry and violent running style.

          2. Myles Garrett, DE, Texas A&M*
          Grade: 95
          Garrett has been limited by an ankle injury the past few weeks, but with 28 sacks and 26 QB hurries in 30 career games, Garrett is the real deal. He added 10 pounds of muscle in the offseason, and it shows. He's stronger setting the edge in the running game, and as a pass-rusher, he has a lethal combination of first-step quickness, bend, power and hand-to-hand combat skills.

          3. Jonathan Allen, DE, Alabama
          Grade: 93
          You won't find many prospects in this class who can match Allen's combination of experience and production. He has played 48 games for Alabama, and he has 22 sacks and 19 QB hurries in his past three seasons. He's a true game-plan wrecker, with an excellent combination of quickness and power. One of the best interior pass-rushers we've studied in this draft class, Allen constantly pushes the pocket.

          4. Jabrill Peppers, S, Michigan*
          Grade: 93
          It's really impressive to watch Peppers keep blockers off his pads while playing a hybrid DB/LB role at 205 pounds. He has rare athleticism and will help your team in so many ways, as his film and production from this season prove (10.0 tackles for loss, 2.5 tackles, five QB hurries, two rushing TDs and one punt-return TD).

          5. Malik McDowell, DT, Michigan State*
          Grade: 92
          McDowell's film is good enough to counteract his lack of production as a pass-rusher (0.5 sacks this season). He gives really good effort despite facing what seems like constant double-teams. An elite athlete, McDowell can play all over Michigan State's defensive front, and he shows very good range for his position, closing on the quarterback in a flash.

          6. Jamal Adams, S, LSU*
          Grade: 92
          Adams is a huge difference-maker against the run as an in-the-box defender, racking up a team-leading 23 solo tackles this season. Even though he has room to improve his technique in coverage, he showed his raw ability with two pass breakups versus Missouri earlier this season. Adams has an excellent blend of size, length and athleticism.

          7. Devonte Fields, OLB, Louisville
          Grade: 92
          Fields hasn't been quite as productive as a pass-rusher this season, recording two sacks and five QB hurries after an 11-sack and 12-hurry season in 2015, but there's a lot to like about his raw ability. He has an excellent first-step quickness and bend around the edge. The character red flags are concerning, though. Fields struggled to stay out of trouble at TCU and was dismissed from the program after being accused of assaulting his ex-girlfriend (the charge was eventually dropped).

          8. Reuben Foster, ILB, Alabama
          Grade: 92
          Man, Foster can hit. He gets downhill in a hurry and shows explosive tackling ability. He leads the team with 41 tackles this season and has proved to be a key cog in Alabama's ridiculous run defense. He has a good combination of agility and speed for a player of his size (240 pounds), though I would like to see Foster improve his instincts and recognition skills.

          9. Dalvin Cook, RB, Florida State*
          Grade: 90
          Cook is averaging 227.5 total yards per game in his past four outings. Yeah, it's safe to say he has all the tools to be a three-down back in the NFL. Cook isn't an ankle-breaker, but he makes defenders miss with subtle changes in direction, and he doesn't need much of a crease to explode through the hole.

          10. Dawaune Smoot, DE, Illinois
          Grade: 90
          Smoot has shown his explosive first-step the past three games, racking up six tackles for loss, three QB hurries and one forced fumble. A gifted pass-rusher, Smoot keeps offensive tackles on their heels with his ability to win with speed, power and redirection quickness.

          11. Tim Williams, OLB, Alabama
          Grade: 90
          After being M.I.A. in the season's first few contests, Williams has flashed his raw pass-rushing ability lately. He has three sacks and four QB hurries in his past three games. His recent arrest on a misdemeanor gun charge doesn't help his draft stock, but he has a very high ceiling as a pass-rusher.

          12. Derek Barnett, DE, Tennessee*
          Grade: 90
          Barnett is a beast off the edge, and, perhaps most important, he has shown up in the Vols' two toughest games. Against Texas A&M and Alabama, he contributed two sacks, two QB hurries and one forced fumble. Barnett is very efficient keeping blockers off his frame, and he plays with very good discipline, a consistent motor and impressive physicality. A true junior, he also has quality versatility, with the ability to line up at both DE spots and reduce inside on pass-rushing downs.

          13. Charles Harris, DE, Missouri*
          Grade: 89
          Harris was extremely disruptive last season (SEC-leading 18.5 tackles for loss). He has been a little hot-and-cold this year, with three sacks and one QB hurry versus Georgia and not much production elsewhere. But I love his motor and quickness. If Harris adds some bulk to his frame, watch out.

          14. Mike Williams, WR, Clemson*
          Grade: 89
          Williams now has touchdowns in four consecutive contests, and he set a single-game career high with 12 catches last Saturday against NC State. He has shown good versatility this season, winning across the middle for a TD against Louisville and climbing the ladder to snag a score vs. Georgia Tech. After suffering a scary, season-ending neck injury early last season, Williams (6-3) has again proved to be a terrific deep-ball threat. He averages nearly 17 yards per catch for his career.

          15. Jarrad Davis, OLB, Florida
          Grade: 89
          Davis ranks tied for seventh in the SEC with eight tackles per game, and he has had some good moments in coverage, too, including three pass breakups against Vanderbilt two weeks ago. He reminds me a little of Bucs OLB Kwon Alexander, because he's an explosive athlete and a high-impact tackler. Davis has excellent range and a relentless motor and brings added value on special teams.

          16. Caleb Brantley, DT, Florida*
          Grade: 89
          Brantley is more of a disruptor than someone who's going to put up eye-popping production. He has the combination of quickness and functional strength to excel as an interior player at the next level. When he's at his best, as he was against Alabama in the SEC championship game last season, Brantley can be a load to handle in the run game.

          17. Cam Robinson, OT, Alabama*
          Grade: 89
          Robinson is a true road-grader in the run game and a huge reason why the Crimson Tide put up 438 rushing yards against Tennessee last week. He just consistently drives defenders off the ball when he's playing with leverage. Teams will need to investigate Robinson's character after an arrest in May 2016for possession of marijuana and illegal possession of a stolen firearm, though charges were eventually dropped.

          18. Teez Tabor, CB, Florida*
          Grade: 89
          With four interceptions and a defensive touchdown in five games, it's clear Tabor has some of the best ball skills among CBs in this draft class. His technique still has some room to grow, but it's hard to ignore Tabor's natural anticipation and elite production, including five interceptions and 22 pass breakups in the two seasons before this one.

          19. Charles Walker, DT, Oklahoma*
          Grade: 89
          Walker recently suffered his second concussion in the past 10 months, causing him to miss the Sooners' past two games. When he's healthy, Walker has the quickness to shoot gaps and disrupt run plays in the backfield. He has good lower-body strength and a lot of upside as a pass-rusher.

          20. Christian McCaffrey, RB, Stanford*
          Grade: 89
          McCaffrey suffered an undisclosed injury in the second half of the Cardinal's game against Washington State, and he missed last week's win over Notre Dame. Coaches and teammates rave about McCaffrey's work ethic and tireless motor. He practices as hard as he plays, and it shows in his sheer stamina on Saturdays. From rushing to receiving to returning, McCaffrey is asked to do a ton for the Cardinal, and he delivers with a rare combination of vision, lateral agility and acceleration.

          21. JuJu Smith-Schuster, WR, USC*
          Grade: 88
          Smith-Schuster struggled a bit out of the gate, but he has come alive ever since Sam Darnold replaced Max Browne at QB. An explosive WR, he has 368 yards and six TDs in his past three games. Smith-Schuster shows the ability to create late separation when the ball is in the air, and he does a good job weaving through traffic in the open field.

          22. Mike McGlinchey, OT, Notre Dame
          Grade: 88
          McGlinchey is long enough to protect the edge against most speed rushers when his footwork is sound. With that said, he's best suited to initially play on the right side in the NFL. He flashes a nasty disposition and gets under defenders' skin.

          23. Carl Lawson, DE, Auburn*
          Grade: 87
          Lawson has popped as a pass-rusher this season, registering five sacks, six QB hurries and one forced fumble in his past three games. And he was already an elite run defender with a powerful upper body and heavy hands. Lawson has the skill set of a potential first-rounder, but his previous injuries, including a torn ACL in 2014 and a hip injury in 2015, will need to be checked out.

          24. O.J. Howard, TE, Alabama
          Grade: 87
          Alabama hasn't used Howard a ton as a pass-catcher this season; he's averaging just two receptions per game. But turn on last year's College Football Playoff National Championship, in which he posted 208 receiving yards and two TDs, and it won't take long to see Howard's big-play ability. He has rare top-end speed for the position.

          25. Quenton Nelson, G, Notre Dame*
          Grade: 87
          Nelson has established himself as one of the best guards in the country. He shows good effort, toughness and technique in the running game, and it's tough for pass-rushers to get around his 6-5, 325-pound frame. Nelson projects as a Day 1 NFL starter.

          26. Marcus Maye, S, Florida
          Grade: 87
          Maye is not as physical against the run as former teammate and 2016 first-rounder Keanu Neal, but he's more well-rounded and steadier in coverage. Maye shows excellent field awareness and shoulders a lot of responsibilities in Florida's defense, making pre-snap checks and getting teammates lined up.

          27. Cordrea Tankersley, CB, Clemson*
          Grade: 87
          Tankersley led the Tigers with five interceptions in 2015, and while he doesn't have an interception yet this season, he has six pass breakups in seven games. At 6-1 and with the strength and length to disrupt bigger receivers, he fits best in a press-heavy scheme. Tankersley is confident enough to hold up on an island and has borderline outstanding ball skills.

          28. Jake Butt, TE, Michigan*
          Grade: 86
          At 6-6 and 250 pounds, Butt has very good speed and fluidity for his size. He has been a solid contributor this season (270 yards and 3 TDs) for an offense that just doesn't throw the ball a ton. Butt will be able to stretch the seam in the NFL and make tough catches in traffic.

          29. Raekwon McMillan, ILB, Ohio State*
          Grade: 86
          McMillan takes good angles to the ball, shows an elite ability to discard blockers and is a very good tackler. But he needs to improve in coverage to convince NFL teams that he's an every-down linebacker.

          30. Tre'Davious White, CB, LSU*
          Grade: 86
          White is one of the most experienced players in this class, having started 40 games in his LSU career. He has elite football instincts and a good overall feel for route combinations. The one question on White entering this season was his lack of ball production, but he already has two interceptions in 2016, including a pick-six versus Wisconsin. And he brings added value as a punt returner: White has scored three career return TDs.

          31. Chris Wormley, DT, Michigan*
          Grade: 86
          At 6-6, 302 pounds, Wormley is a force along the interior and someone you can count on to win one-on-one battles in the run game. He has 2.5 sacks in the games against Michigan's two toughest Big Ten opponents thus far, Penn State and Wisconsin. And although Wormley has just adequate first-step quickness, he's agile for his size and shows impressive stamina.

          32. Isaac Rochell, DE, Notre Dame
          Grade: 86
          In his two prior seasons, I thought Rochell was more disruptive than his 3.5 sacks indicated, and I'd say the same has held true this year. He doesn't yet have a sack, but Rochell has nine total QB hurries, including four against Syracuse alone. He also shows the ability to occupy multiple blockers in the run game and still make plays, with six tackles for loss in seven games.
          Last edited by H2O4me; 11-05-2016, 05:36 PM.
          In 2016 Brock Osweiler was rated last (32nd) among all QBs (>400 attempts) by ProFootballFocus and ranked 33rd/34 QBs (>200 attempts) by Football Outsiders.

          Comment


          • #6
            Praying for Cam Robinson or Reuben Foster

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by 281Texan View Post
              Praying for Cam Robinson...
              With the poor OTs class and so much bad OL play in the league,

              I don't think we'll have a chance at Cam absent a big trade up.
              In 2016 Brock Osweiler was rated last (32nd) among all QBs (>400 attempts) by ProFootballFocus and ranked 33rd/34 QBs (>200 attempts) by Football Outsiders.

              Comment


              • #8
                McShay's Top 32: McCaffrey, Fournette among elite RBs in '17 class


                Here, we'll look at which players have moved up and down our Top 32, drawing on the same scouting reports as before and making changes only where necessary.

                We'll continue to update our board as we get closer to the 2017 NFL draft. Although it's a given that some players will move into the rankings and others will drop out, this provides a good snapshot of which players currently have the most NFL potential, based on our evaluations.

                Note: Underclassmen are marked with an asterisk.

                1. Leonard Fournette, RB, LSU*
                Grade: 95
                Fournette will sit out LSU's bowl game because of the same left ankle injury that has been bothering him all season. He'll finish the season with only 144 touches, far below the 319 he had a season ago, which works to his benefit from a wear-and-tear standpoint. When fully healthy, Fournette is a big-play machine with a rare combination of size, power, agility and speed for the position. His angry running style is something at which to marvel and will translate well to the next level.

                2. Myles Garrett, DE, Texas A&M*
                Grade: 95
                Garrett is the best pure pass-rusher in this class. He has played through an ankle injury for much of this season and still finished fifth in the SEC with 15.0 tackles for loss (including 8.5 sacks). Garrett has a lethal combination of first-step quickness, bend, power and hand-to-hand combat skills. After adding 10 pounds of muscle in the offseason, he has been stronger setting the edge in the running game.

                3. Jonathan Allen, DE, Alabama
                Grade: 94
                Allen, who lines up all over Alabama's D-line, hasn't been quite as productive from a sack standpoint (8.5 versus 12.0), but don't be fooled: He has been every bit the game plan-wrecker, with 15 QB hurries and 13 total tackles for loss. Allen has an excellent combination of quickness and power and is one of the best interior pass-rushers we've studied in this draft class. He constantly pushes the pocket and brings tremendous experience to the table, with 54 games played.

                4. Jamal Adams, S, LSU*
                Grade: 93
                Adams is one of the most complete players in this class. He's is a true difference-maker as an in-the-box defender, racking up six tackles for loss in his past six games. Even though he has room to improve his technique in coverage, Adams has shown his ceiling in that area on multiple occasions. He has an excellent blend of size, length and athleticism, and it shows up on tape.

                5. Reuben Foster, ILB, Alabama
                Grade: 92
                Foster is one of the better inside linebacker prospects in recent memory. He just flies to the ball. When he gets there, he shows explosive tackling ability. Foster has 10.5 tackles for loss in his past seven games and 27 more total tackles this season than his next-best teammate. For a player his size (240 pounds), Foster shows a good combination of agility and speed.

                6. Jabrill Peppers, S, Michigan*
                Grade: 92
                Peppers is a polarizing player because it's a little tricky to find him a true position, but I see him as a great fit for the modern NFL. He has the speed and athleticism to thrive in space and the toughness to play bigger than his 205-pound frame. Think of Peppers as a hybrid player at the next level -- a Deone Bucannon-type -- who can help your team in a lot of ways (he finished the regular season with 15.0 tackles for loss, 3.5 sacks, seven QB hurries, three rushing TDs and one punt-return TD). The biggest concern for me is his a lack of ball production at Michigan (he has only one career interception).

                7. Dalvin Cook, RB, Florida State*
                Grade: 91
                Cook -- who broke the 2,000 total yards mark in the Seminoles' regular-season finale -- can truly do it all. He makes defenders miss with subtle changes in direction, and he doesn't need much of a crease to rattle off a big play. At 5-foot-11, 213 pounds, Cook is tied for second among all Power 5 RBs this season with 15 touches of 25 yards or more.

                8. Marshon Lattimore, CB, Ohio State*
                Grade: 91
                A first-year starter, Lattimore is more naturally gifted than former Ohio State CB Eli Apple, who went No. 10 overall to the Giants in the 2016 draft. At 6-foot, 192 pounds, Lattimore has good length and really fluid movement skills. He has taken full advantage of his spike in playing time, with four interceptions and nine pass breakups this season.

                9. Tim Williams, OLB, Alabama
                Grade: 90
                Williams wasn't playing as consistent as you'd hope to start the season, but he has proved to be a disruptive player, posting 14 of his 15.5 total tackles for loss against SEC opponents. He has excellent first-step quickness, explosive power and a really high ceiling. But teams will have to take into account Williams' character; he was arrested earlier this season on a misdemeanor gun charge.

                10. Mike Williams, WR, Clemson*
                Grade: 90
                Williams scored 10 touchdowns in a nine-game span this season and showed all the skills you look for in a legit No. 1 NFL wide receiver. He shows an excellent ability to create late separation when the ball is in the air. At 6-foot-3, Williams has a good size-speed combination.

                11. Malik McDowell, DT, Michigan State*
                Grade: 90
                McDowell missed the regular season's final three games because of an ankle injury, and before that, his film and production (1.5 sacks, 7.0 TFLs) had taken a dive from last season. He just isn't the consistent grinder who typically comes out of Michigan State. But McDowell has elite athleticism and can play multiple positions along the D-line at the next level.

                12. Derek Barnett, DE, Tennessee*
                Grade: 89
                Barnett leads the SEC in both tackles for loss (18.0) and sacks (12.0). Perhaps more impressive, all of his sacks came against SEC opponents. Barnett is efficient at keeping blockers off his frame, and he plays with good discipline, a consistent motor and impressive physicality. He has terrific intangibles and finds a way to affect the game in multiple ways with his natural instincts.

                13. Jarrad Davis, OLB, Florida
                Grade: 89
                Davis finds so many ways to affect a game. He makes plays in the backfield (six tackles for loss and five QB hurries) and is athletic enough to hold up in coverage. Plus, Davis showed great toughness playing through a severely sprained ankle against Georgia to record 2.5 tackles for loss earlier this season. He reminds me a little of Bucs OLB Kwon Alexander because of his excellent range and relentless motor.

                14. Caleb Brantley, DT, Florida*
                Grade: 89
                Brantley is more of a disruptor than someone who is going to put up eye-popping production. He has a good combination of quickness and functional strength to excel as an interior player at the next level. When he's at his best -- as he was in back-to-back games against LSU and Florida State (5.0 tackles for loss) -- Brantley can be a load to handle in the running game.

                15. Cam Robinson, OT, Alabama*
                Grade: 89
                Robinson has been a force for Alabama, particularly in the running game, where the Crimson Tide averaged 260 rushing yards per game in SEC play. He consistently drives defenders off the ball when he's playing with leverage. But I'd like to see more consistency in pass protection, and teams will need to investigate Robinson's character after an arrest in May 2016 for possession of marijuana and illegal possession of a stolen firearm (charges were eventually dropped).

                16. Teez Tabor, CB, Florida*
                Grade: 89
                Tabor has some of the best ball skills among cornerbacks in this draft class, with four interceptions, five pass breakups and a defensive TD in 11 games. His technique still has some room to grow, but it's hard to ignore Tabor's natural anticipation and elite production, including five interceptions and 22 pass breakups in the two seasons before this one.

                17. D'Onta Foreman, RB, Texas
                Grade: 89
                Foreman's stock has exploded this season, as he ranks first in the FBS with 184.4 rushing yards per game. At 6-foot-1 and 249 pounds, Foreman is a load to bring down, and he has really good feet for his size. He creates a ton of yards after contact each week, and he doesn't get tackled in the backfield very often. As a bonus, Foreman is excellent in pass protection.

                18. John Ross, WR, Washington
                Grade: 88
                Ross has always had great speed, but he improved his route running this year and saw immediate dividends with a 17-touchdown season. After showing an ability to handle physical coverage this season, I'm looking forward to watching him against Alabama's secondary in the CFP semis. If he runs as fast as expected at the NFL combine, Ross could very well be a first-rounder.

                19. JuJu Smith-Schuster, WR, USC*
                Grade: 88
                Smith-Schuster had 368 yards and six TDs in a three-game span in October before battling through injuries and seeing his production fall off a bit. When healthy, he shows really good run-after-catch ability, and he has the size (6-foot-2, 220 pounds), ball skills and toughness to be in the first-round mix.

                20. Takkarist McKinley, OLB, UCLA
                Grade: 88
                McKinley has been one of this season's biggest draft risers. He parlayed his elite speed off the edge into 18.0 tackles for loss and 10.0 sacks in 11 games (both of which are second in the Pac-12). To put that in perspective, McKinley had 11.0 total TFLs and 7.0 sacks in his first two seasons combined. He brings a ton of upside to the table.

                21. Ryan Ramczyk, OT, Wisconsin
                Grade: 88
                Ramczyk transferred to Wisconsin after two seasons at UW-Stevens Points (Division III), and he has been absolutely dominant this season. With an ideal frame (6-foot-6, 314 pounds) and long arms, Ramczyk has been very consistent as a run-blocker and in pass protection for the Badgers.

                22. Charles Harris, DE, Missouri*
                Grade: 88
                Harris finished the regular season on a tear, with 5.5 sacks, six QB hurries and a forced fumble in his final four games. This comes after he led the SEC with 18.5 tackles for loss in 2015. A twitchy athlete off the edge, Harris is just scratching the surface as a pass-rusher. If he adds some bulk to his frame, watch out.

                23. O.J. Howard, TE, Alabama
                Grade: 88
                At 6-foot-6, 251 pounds, Howard's size-speed combination gives him a lot of upside, but his production has been streaky in Alabama's run-heavy offense. Don't forget: This is the guy who posted 208 receiving yards and two TDs in last year's College Football Playoff National Championship.

                24. Jourdan Lewis, CB, Michigan*
                Grade: 88
                Lewis has some size limitations (5-foot-11, 186 pounds), but he's the top man-to-man cover corner I saw in college football this season. He had one of the best interceptions you'll ever see, and in the last five games of the regular season, he accumulated seven pass breakups and another pick. Lewis has shown the ability to lock down half the field with regularity.

                25. Quincy Wilson, CB, Florida*
                Grade: 88
                I haven't watched as much tape on Wilson as I have on his teammate Tabor, but some scouts I've talked to think Wilson's ceiling is higher. At 6-foot-1, he has a good length/speed combination, and he's experienced, with 38 games played including 23 starts.

                26. Jake Butt, TE, Michigan*
                Grade: 87

                Much like Alabama's Howard, Butt isn't going to put up incredible numbers in a Michigan offense that ranks 95th in the FBS with 27.7 pass attempts per game. But he's very reliable (43 catches, 518 yards, four TDs), and at 6-foot-6, 250 pounds, he will be able to stretch the seam in the NFL and make tough catches in traffic.

                27. Carl Lawson, DE, Auburn*
                Grade: 87
                Lawson has shown just how explosive he can be after coming off back-to-back injury-plagued seasons. He has 24 QB hurries this season. He has a great combination of production, upside and intangibles. Also an elite run defender, Lawson has the skill set of a potential first-rounder if his long-term medical prognosis comes up clean.

                28. Mike McGlinchey, OT, Notre Dame
                Grade: 87
                McGlinchey is long enough to protect the edge against most speed-rushers when his footwork is sound. With that said, he's best suited to initially play on the right side in the NFL. He flashes a nasty disposition and gets under the skin of defenders.

                29. Christian McCaffrey, RB, Stanford*
                Grade: 87
                McCaffrey's college career is over, after he announced Monday that he'll be skipping the Sun Bowl to start prepping for the NFL draft. He finished the season on a tear against some overmatched defenses (222.4 total yards per game and 12 TDs in his final five contests). From rushing to receiving to returning, McCaffrey was asked to do a ton for the Cardinal, and he delivered with a rare combination of vision, lateral agility and acceleration.

                30. Mitch Trubisky, QB, North Carolina*
                Grade: 87
                In his first year as a full-time starter, Trubisky has shown good accuracy (68.9 completion percentage) and an ability to limit mistakes (only four turnovers all season). Trubisky's 12 career starts are a bit concerning, as the history of quarterbacks leaving school early without a ton of game reps isn't great (just look at Mark Sanchez). The ability is certainly there with Trubisky, but you want to see more of a sample size. I'd advise him to return to school to get more reps, a decision that's easier said than done, given the lack of top-end QB talent in this draft class and the number of teams drafting in the top 10 that need new blood at the position.

                31. Quenton Nelson, G, Notre Dame*
                Grade: 87
                Nelson has established himself as one of the best guards in the country. He shows good effort, toughness and technique in the running game, and it's tough for pass-rushers to get around his 6-foot-5, 325-pound frame. Nelson projects as a day one NFL starter.

                32. Bucky Hodges, TE, Virginia Tech*
                Grade: 87
                A three-year starter, Hodges has 20 touchdowns in that span, best in the FBS among Power 5 tight ends. Seven of those scores came this season, as he proved to be a big target who is versatile enough to move around the formation. Long, fast and athletic, Hodges is a tough matchup for smaller cornerbacks when split out wide.
                In 2016 Brock Osweiler was rated last (32nd) among all QBs (>400 attempts) by ProFootballFocus and ranked 33rd/34 QBs (>200 attempts) by Football Outsiders.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Kiper's 2017 Big Board: Movers, shakers after bowl season

                  Mel Kiper Jr.Football analyst
                  The college football season is over -- how about that great title game? -- and it's time for my first Big Board since before bowl season. Much has changed: A Pac-12 defender has moved into the top 10, another running back has moved into the top five and teammates from an SEC school not named Alabama joined the top 25.

                  With the Jan. 16 deadline looming for underclassmen to declare for the NFL draft, some of the prospects in my Big Board and on my position rankings are still undecided. I'm leaving them in for now until they make their decisions one way or the other.

                  One more thing: Prepare yourself for Mock 1.0, which will be out next week.

                  One asterisk denotes a junior, and two asterisks denote a redshirt sophomore for the 2016 season.

                  1. *Myles Garrett, DE, Texas A&M
                  Garrett had a frustrating season, hampered by a high ankle sprain he suffered in late September, and his sack numbers (8.5) were down from his freshman (11.5) and sophomore (12.5) seasons. The injury took away some of the explosiveness that makes him such a promising talent. But when he's on, as he was when he had 4.5 sacks against UTSA in mid-November, he's a brilliant, natural pass-rusher. The injury shouldn't affect Garrett's draft status. At 6-foot-5, 265 pounds, he has the length, strength and ability to bend the edge. I think he's a top-five lock.

                  2. Jonathan Allen, DE, Alabama
                  Allen was one of the top two or three defenders in the country this season. He had 10.5 sacks, including one in the national title game loss, after having 12 sacks in 2015. I wrote in October about Allen's performance against Texas A&M, in which he had a signature sack and returned a fumble for a touchdown. Defensive end, defensive tackle -- the 6-3, 264-pound Allen can play anywhere on the line, and coach Nick Saban loves him. He's in the mix to go No. 1 overall.

                  3. *Leonard Fournette, RB, LSU
                  Fournette struggled with a gimpy ankle this season, missing four games. Don't worry about him, though. He is really special when he's healthy. He has an incredible combination of size (6-1, 235), speed and power that can make him look like a varsity player hanging with the JV. Mileage was a concern heading into the season, but that's less of an issue now. He had a whopping 300 carries in 2015 -- for 1,953 yards and 22 touchdowns -- and he had only 129 in 2016.

                  4. Reuben Foster, ILB, Alabama
                  Foster is a big-time inside linebacker, and he might have been Alabama's best linebacker in 2015. Yes, better than Reggie Ragland, who went in the second round to the Bills in the 2016 draft and whom I had as the No. 24-ranked prospect. Foster (6-1, 240) has more range, runs sideline to sideline and is a more complete player. He's a terrific blitzer, too, and recorded five sacks this season. Expect him to follow in the footsteps of inside linebackers from Alabama who have gone in the first round, such as Rolando McClain, Dont'a Hightower and C.J. Mosley.

                  5. *Dalvin Cook, RB, Florida State
                  Cook (5-11, 213) is a home run hitter who can turn small creases into massive gains. He finished the season with 100-yard rushing performances in nine of his last 10 games, including 145 rushing yards and 62 receiving yards in the Orange Bowl win over Michigan. He averaged 6.1 yards per carry this season -- after averaging 7.4 in 2015 -- and had 33 receptions for 488 yards. With good hands and the ability to find and pick up blitzes, he's versatile. He had a whopping 40 total touchdowns in the past two seasons.

                  6. *Jamal Adams, S, LSU
                  Adams (6-1, 213) was a huge part of LSU's defensive success, even if it doesn't show on the stat sheet (one interception, one sack, one forced fumble). He has great bloodlines -- his dad, George Adams, was the No. 19 overall pick in the 1985 NFL draft. He is built for today's NFL as a versatile safety who can play in the box effectively, make tackles against the run and move to the edges and track slot receivers.

                  7. **Solomon Thomas, DE, Stanford
                  Thomas, only a third-year sophomore, was one of the best defenders in the Pac-12 in 2016, and he's the biggest riser on this edition of the Big Board. He plays like a veteran, causing disruptions in both the running and passing games. He had eight sacks this season while playing end, but at 6-3, 270 pounds, he could move inside and play tackle, too. The versatility is what stands out. And he has some speed -- check out this fumble return.

                  8. **Jabrill Peppers, S, Michigan
                  Peppers, who finished fifth in the Heisman voting, was the best prospect on one of the best defenses in the country. At 6-0, 210 pounds, he is a tweener without a set position in the NFL, as I wrote in December. His potential is as an in-the-box safety or linebacker who helps in run support and goes out and covers receivers and tight ends, but he's not for everybody; not every team will give him a high grade. I expect him to test off the charts at the NFL combine. He's a special athlete.

                  9. *Mike Williams, WR, Clemson
                  Williams, my No. 1 receiver, has great burst and speed for his size (6-2, 225). He made some fantastic catches in the national title game, finishing with eight receptions for 94 yards and a touchdown. He put behind the scary neck injury that prematurely ended his 2015 season, and he was Deshaun Watson's go-to target this season. He had 98 catches for 1,361 yards and 11 touchdowns in 2016. He also had more than 1,000 receiving yards as a sophomore in 2014 while averaging a whopping 18.1 yards per catch.

                  10. **Marshon Lattimore, CB, Ohio State
                  At 6-1, 190, Lattimore was a first-year starter who struggled because of a hamstring injury during his first two years in Columbus. He was fantastic in 2016, standing out in a group of talented defenders and posting four interceptions. He tackles well and has locked down receivers. The 2017 cornerback class could be special, and Lattimore is in the top tier.

                  11. Takkarist McKinley, DE, UCLA
                  Pac-12 offensive tackles had nightmares this season about McKinley, who is a dominant speed rusher. At 6-2, 240, he's not huge, but his explosion off the line is suited for today's NFL. A former junior college player, McKinley really came on as a senior, recording 10 sacks and three forced fumbles. McKinley impressed me with his motor too, even while dealing with multiple injuries.

                  12. *Cam Robinson, OT, Alabama
                  This isn't a great class for top-tier blindside protectors, and some of that has to do with the lack of seniors. The first senior in my list of the top 10 offensive tackles comes in at No. 4. Robinson, a junior, was a starter from day one at Alabama, and he is already a known commodity around the NFL. At 6-6, 327, he's battle-tested and extremely consistent. I think he'd be better as a right tackle in the NFL -- he's a better run-blocker than he is a pass-blocker -- but he's probably going to get a shot on the left side. He has the talent to be a top-10 pick and the first tackle off the board.

                  13. Tim Williams, OLB, Alabama
                  Williams, the top-ranked prospect in my preseason Big Board, does one thing incredibly well: rush the passer. And that's what NFL teams are looking for. He's a fantastic pass-rushing talent who can be unblockable at times. Williams (6-4, 250) has improved with the other parts of his game -- he can adequately take on blockers and play the run. After 10.5 sacks in 2015, when he played only about 20 percent of Alabama's defensive snaps, Williams had nine sacks in 2016. He's likely an outside linebacker in a 3-4 in the NFL.

                  14. **Malik Hooker, S, Ohio State
                  Hooker is another third-year sophomore. The first-year starter was the best center-field-type safety I saw this season -- he has incredible range. He had seven interceptions and returned three of them for touchdowns. The 6-foot-2, 205-pound Hooker is dynamic; he was all over the field for the Buckeyes.

                  15. *Christian McCaffrey, RB, Stanford
                  The Stanford offense was built around McCaffrey for the past two years. He runs, catches passes, blocks and returns kicks and punts. With 590 carries for 3,622 yards and 82 catches for 955 yards the past two seasons, he has shown that he can carry the load. McCaffrey (6-0, 200) has incredible balance and could be an every-down back in the NFL. And it helps that he played in a pro-style offense at Stanford. His father, Ed, had a long NFL career as a wide receiver, and his brother, Max, was a good receiver at Duke.

                  16. *Mitch Trubisky, QB, North Carolina
                  I've been vocal about how Trubisky would benefit from another year in college, but he's entering the draft, and he's my top-ranked signal-caller. I don't see a potential top-five talent at quarterback in this draft. In his first year as the full-time starter, Trubisky (6-3, 220) completed 68.2 percent of his passes and had 30 touchdown passes and only six interceptions. He throws a nice ball, has some touch and velocity and is mobile too. He had five rushing touchdowns. 17. *Teez Tabor, CB, Florida

                  Tabor just makes plays. He shows up in big moments every time I turn on the tape, breaking up passes and locking down receivers. He returned two interceptions for touchdowns in 2015. He was all over the field this season, too. You could argue that Tabor (6-0, 201) was the most consistently effective Florida cornerback last season, and Vernon Hargreaves III went No. 11 overall to the Bucs. Tabor had four interceptions this season, including a pick-six. He also had a sack.

                  18. *Taco Charlton, DE, Michigan
                  Charlton was the best defensive player on the field in Michigan's loss to Ohio State in late November. The 6-5, 270-pound defensive end had 2.5 sacks and nine total tackles, showing off a full arsenal of pass-rushing moves. He finished the season with 9.5 sacks despite missing two games earlier in the year because of an ankle injury. Charlton plays with good leverage for his height, has active hands and takes great angles when rushing. And he's helped by an incredible wingspan. Charlton can play on his feet, which means he could fit in a 4-3 or 3-4 scheme.

                  19. Jarrad Davis, LB, Florida
                  Injuries to both ankles caused Davis (6-2, 226) to miss a few games late in the season, but he is a steady and reliable linebacker who has a nose for the football. He could play inside or outside linebacker in the NFL, but he's not a pass-rusher, though he did have 5.5 sacks the past two seasons. Davis is an every-down linebacker at the next level -- he can cover tight ends and backs in the passing game -- and fits what teams are looking for these days. He could play all three positions in a 4-3 defense or the inside in a 3-4. I love his intangibles too; he has tremendous character.

                  20. *Malik McDowell, DT, Michigan State
                  McDowell suffered an ankle injury in the Spartans' loss to Illinois in early November and missed the last three games of the season. He had some growing pains, but the talent is there. McDowell is a fantastic athlete with a 6-6, 290-pound frame. Production has been his issue -- McDowell had 1.5 sacks this season and only 7.5 in his career. He's an elite-level prospect, though, and could be a top-15 pick.

                  21. *Derek Barnett, DE, Tennessee
                  Barnett was stellar after a slow start to the season. He had 13 sacks, and he even had an interception in a loss to Alabama. Barnett (6-3, 265) is an all-around defender who beats double-teams, makes plays in the running game and gets after quarterbacks. I see him as a 4-3 defensive end in the NFL, not a 3-4 outside linebacker, but that shouldn't hurt his value. Barnett, who had 33 career sacks, could be a top-10 pick.

                  22. *Charles Harris, DE, Missouri
                  Harris was up and down in 2016. The highlight of his season was his effort in the Tigers' loss to Georgia in September. He was tremendously disruptive, with three sacks, a tackle for loss and a batted-down pass, and he showed off a variety of pass-rushing moves. That's how he can perform when he's at his best. Harris had nine sacks this season. A 6-3, 255-pound pass-rusher, Harris can stand up in a 3-4 or put his hand on the ground in a 4-3. He even moved inside to defensive tackle a few times to rush the quarterback. Last season, he led the SEC with 18.5 tackles for loss.

                  23. *Quincy Wilson, CB, Florida
                  Wilson is the third Florida defender and second Florida cornerback on my Big Board. He is a big corner (6-1, 213) with good ball skills and instincts. He had three interceptions, including one pick-six, and a sack this season. He and Tabor are a notch below Lattimore on my cornerback tier rankings, but Wilson could be the second cornerback off the board in April. He improved immensely from 2015 to 2016.

                  24. **Marlon Humphrey, CB, Alabama
                  At 6-1, Humphrey is a big, lockdown corner. He had three interceptions as a redshirt freshman last season and was a key playmaker for the national champs. He had two interceptions in 2016, and the first was returned for a touchdown. A hamstring injury slowed him down toward the end of the season, but he's an outstanding prospect. Humphrey has great bloodlines, too: His father, Bobby, was a big-time running back at Alabama who was picked by the Broncos in the first round of the 1989 supplemental draft.

                  25. *Ryan Ramczyk, OT, Wisconsin
                  Ramczyk has had an unusual -- and amazing -- path to the NFL. He started two years at Division III Wisconsin-Stevens Point, transferred to Wisconsin and redshirted, then was an All-American left tackle as a fourth-year junior this season. At 6-6, 314, Ramczyk is another prospect who might be better served playing on the right side. His tape isn't overwhelming -- he's not a talent on the level of former Badger Joe Thomas -- but he can be a quality starting tackle in the NFL. Ramczyk just had hip surgery and should be fine long term, but he won't be working out at the combine.



                  Top 10 prospects at each position for 2017 NFL draft

                  Mel Kiper Jr.Football analyst
                  Time for another edition of my position rankings for the 2017 NFL draft. With the Jan. 16 deadline looming for underclassmen to declare for the NFL draft, some of the prospects in my Big Board and on my position rankings are still undecided. I'm leaving them in for now until they make their decisions one way or the other.

                  One asterisk denotes a junior, and two asterisks denote a redshirt sophomore for the 2016 season.

                  Quarterbacks
                  1. *Mitch Trubisky, North Carolina
                  2. **DeShone Kizer, Notre Dame
                  3. *Deshaun Watson, Clemson
                  4. *Patrick Mahomes, Texas Tech
                  5. *Brad Kaaya, Miami (Fla.)
                  6.*Jerod Evans, Virginia Tech
                  7. Nathan Peterman, Pittsburgh
                  8. Chad Kelly, Mississippi
                  9. C.J. Beathard, Iowa
                  10. Antonio Pipkin, Tiffin

                  Underclassmen dominate this list. Watson (6-foot-2, 210 pounds) was spectacular in the second half of the national title game, but I think he's a Day 2 pick.
                  Running Backs
                  1. *Leonard Fournette, LSU
                  2. *Dalvin Cook, Florida State
                  3. *Christian McCaffrey, Stanford
                  4. *D'Onta Foreman, Texas
                  5. **Joe Mixon, Oklahoma
                  6. Matthew Dayes, NC State
                  7. *Samaje Perine, Oklahoma
                  8. Jamaal Williams, BYU
                  9. *James Conner, Pittsburgh
                  10. Corey Clement, Wisconsin

                  Mixon (6-1, 226) is a phenomenal talent with major character concerns. His teammate Perine (5-10, 235) is a different kind of runner with a different kind of build -- he'll punish defenders downhill.
                  Fullbacks
                  1. Sam Rogers, Virginia Tech
                  2. Shane Smith, San Jose State
                  3. Nate Iese, UCLA
                  4. Anthony Firkser, Harvard
                  5. Freddie Stevenson, Florida State
                  6. Tyler McCloskey, Houston
                  7. Joe Bacci, Central Michigan
                  8. Prescott Line, Michigan State
                  9. Algernon Brown, BYU
                  10. Jaymar Parrish, Pitt

                  You'll notice all of these guys are seniors -- you don't see many fullbacks entering the draft as underclassmen. My last update included underclassmen, so this list is completely different.
                  Wide receivers
                  1. *Mike Williams, Clemson
                  2. Corey Davis, Western Michigan
                  3. *John Ross, Washington
                  4. *Curtis Samuel, Ohio State
                  5. *JuJu Smith-Schuster, USC
                  6. *Carlos Henderson, Louisiana Tech
                  7. *Isaiah Ford, Virginia Tech
                  8. Dede Westbrook, Oklahoma
                  9. Cooper Kupp, Eastern Washington
                  10. Taywan Taylor, Western Kentucky

                  Henderson (5-11, 185) led the country in receiving touchdowns with 19. He had a game with 326 receiving yards and five touchdowns.
                  Tight ends
                  1. O.J. Howard, Alabama
                  2. *Bucky Hodges, Virginia Tech
                  3. Jake Butt, Michigan
                  4. **David Njoku, Miami (Fla.)
                  5. Jordan Leggett, Clemson
                  6. Cole Hikutini, Louisville
                  7. Gerald Everett, South Alabama
                  8. Pharaoh Brown, Oregon
                  9. Evan Engram, Mississippi
                  10. Jeremy Sprinkle, Arkansas

                  Njoku is another third-year sophomore. At 6-4, 244, he's an incredible athlete. He had 43 catches for 898 yards and eight touchdowns this season.
                  Offensive tackles
                  1. *Cam Robinson, Alabama
                  2. *Ryan Ramczyk, Wisconsin
                  3. *Garett Bolles, Utah
                  4. Dion Dawkins, Temple
                  5. *Roderick Johnson, Florida State
                  6. Taylor Moton, Western Michigan
                  7. Antonio Garcia, Troy
                  8. Zach Banner, USC
                  9. Conor McDermott, UCLA
                  10. Justin Senior, Mississippi State

                  Garcia (6-6, 290) will be at the Senior Bowl. I'm excited to see how he does against better competition.
                  Offensive guards
                  1. Forrest Lamp, Western Kentucky
                  2. Dan Feeney, Indiana
                  3. Dorian Johnson, Pittsburgh
                  4. Nico Siragusa, San Diego State
                  5. *Damien Mama, USC
                  6. Danny Isidora, Miami (Fla.)
                  7. Isaac Asiata, Utah
                  8. Greg Pyke, Georgia
                  9. Jessamen Dunker, Tennessee State
                  10. Jordan Morgan, Kutztown

                  Lamp (6-4, 296) moves up after my top two guards decided to remain in school. Morgan (6-2, 320), who played left tackle at Division II Kutztown, will be at the Senior Bowl.
                  Centers
                  1. Ethan Pocic, LSU
                  2. Pat Elflein, Ohio State
                  3. Tyler Orlosky, West Virginia
                  4. Jon Toth, Kentucky
                  5. Cameron Tom, Southern Mississippi
                  6. Chase Roullier, Wyoming
                  7. Kyle Fuller, Baylor
                  8. Jay Guillermo, Clemson
                  9. Lucas Crowley, North Carolina
                  10. Riley Sorenson, Washington State

                  At 6-7, 301, Pocic doesn't look like a typical center. He could slide out to guard.
                  Defensive ends
                  1. *Myles Garrett, Texas A&M
                  2. Jonathan Allen, Alabama
                  3. **Solomon Thomas, Stanford
                  4. Taco Charlton, Michigan
                  5. *Derek Barnett, Tennessee
                  6. *Charles Harris, Missouri
                  7. Jordan Willis, Kansas State
                  8. *Carl Lawson, Auburn
                  9. Chris Wormley, Michigan
                  10. DeMarcus Walker, Florida State

                  Six of these guys made my latest Big Board. It's a loaded class for pass-rushers.
                  Defensive tackles
                  1. *Malik McDowell, Michigan State
                  2. *Caleb Brantley, Florida
                  3. Carlos Watkins, Clemson
                  4. *Elijah Qualls, Washington
                  5. Jaleel Johnson, Iowa
                  6. *Charles Walker, Oklahoma
                  7. Dalvin Tomlinson, Alabama
                  8. Ryan Glasgow, Michigan
                  9. *Davon Godchaux, LSU
                  10. Montravius Adams, Auburn

                  Watkins (6-3, 305) had 10.5 sacks for the national champs after limited production the rest of his career.
                  Inside linebackers
                  1. Reuben Foster, Alabama
                  2. *Raekwon McMillan, Ohio State
                  3. *Zach Cunningham, Vanderbilt
                  4. *Anthony Walker, Northwestern
                  5. Kendell Beckwith, LSU
                  6. Duke Riley, LSU
                  7. Marquel Lee, Wake Forest
                  8. Ben Gedeon, Michigan
                  9. Keith Kelsey, Louisville
                  10. Hardy Nickerson, Illinois

                  Not many changes here. Foster (6-1, 236) is in a league of his own at the top.
                  Outside linebackers
                  1. Takkarist McKinley, UCLA
                  2. Tim Williams, Alabama
                  3. Jarrad Davis, Florida
                  4. Ryan Anderson, Alabama
                  5. Haason Reddick, Temple
                  6.*T.J. Watt, Wisconsin
                  7. Tyus Bowser, Houston
                  8. Vince Biegel, Wisconsin
                  9. Ejuan Price, Pittsburgh
                  10. Devonte Fields, Louisville

                  Davis (6-2, 226) is an every-down linebacker at the next level who can cover tight ends and backs in the passing game.
                  Cornerbacks
                  1. **Marshon Lattimore, Ohio State
                  2. *Teez Tabor, CB, Florida
                  3. *Quincy Wilson, Florida
                  4. **Marlon Humphrey, Alabama
                  5. Cordrea Tankersley, Clemson
                  6. *Sidney Jones, Washington
                  7. Tre'Davious White, LSU
                  8. Jourdan Lewis, Michigan
                  9. Desmond King, Iowa
                  10. *Gareon Conley, Ohio State

                  Florida and Ohio State both have two corners here. Tabor (6-0, 201), Wilson (6-1, 213) and Humphrey (6-1, 192) are neck and neck for the No. 2 spot. Humphrey has yet to declare his draft intentions, however.
                  Safeties
                  1. *Jamal Adams, LSU
                  2. **Jabrill Peppers, Michigan
                  3. **Malik Hooker, Ohio State
                  4. *Budda Baker, Washington
                  5. *Marcus Williams, Utah
                  6. *Josh Jones, NC State
                  7. Marcus Maye, Florida
                  8. Eddie Jackson, Alabama
                  9. Justin Evans, Texas A&M
                  10. Obi Melifonwu, Connecticut

                  There are six underclassmen at the top. Baker (5-10, 173) isn't very big, but he's fast and isn't afraid to hit.
                  Kickers and punters
                  1. Zane Gonzalez, Arizona State (kicker)
                  2. Austin Rehkow, Idaho (kicker and punter)
                  3. Jake Elliott, Memphis (kicker)
                  4. Justin Vogel, Miami (Fla.) (punter)
                  5. Toby Baker, Arkansas (punter)
                  6. Cameron Johnston, Ohio State (punter)
                  7. Younghoe Koo, Georgia Southern (kicker)
                  8. Kenny Allen, Michigan (kicker and punter)
                  9. Hayden Hunt, Colorado State (punter)
                  10. Harrison Butker, Georgia Tech (kicker)

                  Gonzalez (6-1, 160) led the country in field goals made from 40-plus and 50-plus yards.
                  In 2016 Brock Osweiler was rated last (32nd) among all QBs (>400 attempts) by ProFootballFocus and ranked 33rd/34 QBs (>200 attempts) by Football Outsiders.

                  Comment


                  • #10

                    McShay's Top 32: Big moves up and down the board

                    Todd McShay|ESPN Senior Writer
                    Here, we'll look at which players have moved up and down our top 32, drawing on the same scouting reports as before and making changes where necessary.

                    We'll continue to update our board as we get closer to the 2017 NFL draft and complete our evaluations. Although it's a given that some players will move into the rankings and others will drop out, this provides a good snapshot of which players currently have the most NFL potential, based on our evaluations.

                    Note: Underclassmen are marked with an asterisk.


                    1. Myles Garrett, DE, Texas A&M*

                    Grade: 95

                    Garrett is the best pure pass-rusher in the 2017 draft. He played through an ankle injury for much of this season and still finished tied for sixth in the SEC with 15.0 tackles for loss (including 8.5 sacks). He has a lethal combination of first-step quickness, bend, power and hand-to-hand combat skills. After adding 10 pounds of muscle last offseason, he has been stronger setting the edge in the running game.


                    2. Jonathan Allen, DT, Alabama

                    Grade: 94

                    Allen had 8.5 tackles for loss in his final five games. He's a true game-wrecker, with 15 QB hurries and 10.5 sacks. Allen's excellent combination of quickness and power makes him one of the best interior pass-rushers we've studied in this draft class. He constantly pushes the pocket and brings tremendous experience to the table, with 56 games played.


                    3. Leonard Fournette, RB, LSU*

                    Grade: 94

                    Fournette, who had a nagging ankle injury all year, finished the season with only 144 touches, far below the 319 he had a year ago. That works to his benefit from a wear-and-tear standpoint. When fully healthy, Fournette is a big-play machine with a rare combination of size, power, agility and speed for the position. His angry running style is something to marvel at, and it will translate well to the next level.


                    4. Jamal Adams, S, LSU*

                    Grade: 93

                    Adams is one of the most complete players in this class. He's a difference-maker as an in-the-box defender, racking up 7.0 tackles for loss in his last seven games. Even though he has room to improve his technique in coverage, Adams has shown his ceiling in that area on multiple occasions. He has an excellent blend of size, length and athleticism, and it shows up on tape.


                    5. Solomon Thomas, DE, Stanford*

                    Grade: 93

                    Thomas' combination of quickness and power pops off the screen and helped make him one of the biggest draft risers this season. At 6-foot-3 and 273 pounds, he has good size and strength and he's stout against the run (15.0 tackles for loss, 8.0 sacks and seven QB hurries).


                    6. Malik Hooker, S, Ohio State*

                    Grade: 92

                    Only two players in college football had more interceptions this season than Hooker's seven picks. In his first season as a starter in Columbus, Hooker showed great instincts and range in coverage. He always seems to be around the ball, and after leaving school as a redshirt sophomore, Hooker has a lot of upside.


                    7. Dalvin Cook, RB, Florida State*

                    Grade: 92

                    Cook, who ranked second in the FBS with 2,253 total yards this season, can truly do it all. He makes defenders miss with subtle changes in direction, and he doesn't need much of a crease to rattle off a big play. At 5-11, 213 pounds, Cook is a big play waiting to happen (18 touches of 25 yards or more this season, tied for first among all Power 5 RBs).


                    8. Marshon Lattimore, CB, Ohio State*

                    Grade: 92

                    A first-year starter, Lattimore is more naturally gifted than former Ohio State CB Eli Apple, who went No. 10 overall to the Giants in the 2016 draft. At 6-foot, 192 pounds, Lattimore has good length and fluid movement skills. He took full advantage of his spike in playing time, with four interceptions and nine pass breakups this season.


                    9. Reuben Foster, ILB, Alabama

                    Grade: 92

                    Foster is one of the better inside linebacker prospects in recent memory. He flies to the ball, and when he gets there, he shows explosive tackling ability. Foster had 11.5 tackles for loss in his last 10 games and 30 more total tackles this season than his next-best teammate. For a player his size (240 pounds), Foster shows a good combination of agility and speed.


                    10. Mike Williams, WR, Clemson*

                    Grade: 91

                    Williams physically dominated against Alabama in the CFP National Championship, winning on underneath routes and soaring over the top for a few big plays. He closed out his Clemson career with 11 touchdowns in his final 12 games and showed all the skills you look for in a legit No. 1 NFL wide receiver. He has an excellent ability to create late separation when the ball is in the air. At 6-3, Williams has a good size-speed combination.


                    11. Derek Barnett, DE, Tennessee*

                    Grade: 91

                    Barnett led the SEC in both tackles for loss (19.0) and sacks (13.0). Perhaps more impressive, all but one of his sacks came against SEC opponents. Barnett is efficient at keeping blockers off his frame, and he plays with good discipline, a consistent motor and impressive physicality. He has terrific intangibles and finds a way to affect the game in multiple ways with his natural instincts.


                    12. Jabrill Peppers, S, Michigan*

                    Grade: 91

                    Peppers is a polarizing player because it's a little tricky to find a true position for him, but I see him as a great fit for the modern NFL. He has the speed and athleticism to thrive in space and the toughness to play bigger than his 205-pound frame. Think of Peppers as a hybrid player at the next level -- a Deone Bucannon-type -- who can help your team in a lot of ways (he finished the regular season with 15.0 tackles for loss, 3.5 sacks, seven QB hurries, three rushing TDs and one punt-return TD). The biggest concern for me is his lack of ball production at Michigan; he has only one career interception.


                    13. David Njoku, TE, Miami (Fla.)*

                    Grade: 90

                    Njoku was the biggest surprise of our early evaluations. A good college player who has the potential to develop into a better pro, Njoku is loaded with talent. He averaged 16.2 yards per reception and caught a TD once in every 5.4 receptions. He could be the first tight end off the board. At the very least, he's a clear-cut first-rounder from a talent perspective.


                    14. Ryan Ramczyk, OT, Wisconsin*

                    Grade: 90

                    Ramczyk transferred to Wisconsin after two seasons at UW-Stevens Points (Division III), and he was dominant this season. With an ideal frame (6-6, 314 pounds) and long arms, Ramczyk proved to be consistent as a run-blocker and in pass protection. He played through a hip injury this season that he eventually had surgery to repair on Jan. 5.


                    15. Teez Tabor, CB, Florida*

                    Grade: 90

                    Tabor has some of the best ball skills among cornerbacks in this draft class, with four interceptions, six pass breakups and a defensive TD in 12 games. His technique still has some room to grow, but it's hard to ignore Tabor's natural anticipation and elite production, including five interceptions and 22 pass breakups in the two seasons before this one.


                    16. Taco Charlton, DE, Michigan

                    Grade: 90

                    Charlton finished the season on a tear, compiling 10 sacks in his final 10 games. He has always had the raw ability, but this past season, he showed more consistency and refined technique. Charlton has the ability to be an edge defender in either a 3-4 or 4-3 scheme in the NFL.


                    17. O.J. Howard, TE, Alabama

                    Grade: 89

                    At 6-6, 251 pounds, Howard's size-speed combination gives him a lot of upside as a big-play threat in the NFL, but his production was streaky in Alabama's run-heavy offense. Don't forget: This is the guy who lit up Clemson in two consecutive CFP National Championships (314 receiving yards and three TDs). He should thrive in a more pass-heavy NFL system.


                    18. Sidney Jones, CB, Washington

                    Grade: 89

                    At 6-foot and 181 pounds, Jones is long and a smooth mover, but he needs to get stronger. He has shown the ability to play press coverage and is also adept at playing off-coverage. Jones, who had 3 INTs, six pass breakups and two forced fumbles this season, is physical for a smaller-framed guy, too.


                    19. Takkarist McKinley, OLB, UCLA

                    Grade: 89

                    McKinley has been one of this season's biggest draft risers. He parlayed his elite speed off the edge into 18.0 tackles for loss and 10.0 sacks in 11 games (both of which finished second in the Pac-12). To put that in perspective, McKinley had 11.0 total TFLs and 7.0 sacks in his first two seasons combined. He brings a ton of upside to the table.


                    20. John Ross, WR, Washington

                    Grade: 89

                    Ross has always had great speed, but he improved his route running this year and saw immediate dividends with a 17-touchdown season. His stock shot up after he showed the ability to handle physical coverage. If he runs as fast as expected at the NFL combine, Ross could very well be a first-rounder.


                    21. Corey Davis, WR, Western Michigan

                    Grade: 88

                    Davis stands 6-2, 205 pounds and can apparently run in the 4.4s. If he does so at the combine, he will likely be a first-round pick. Davis was hugely productive in college -- 332 catches, 5,285 yards, 15.9 yards per catch and 52 touchdowns. Plus, he had 73 yards and a TD against Wisconsin, the toughest competition he has faced.


                    22. Forrest Lamp, G, Western Kentucky

                    Grade: 88

                    Lamp played left tackle and started 51 total games for Western Kentucky. We project him as a guard in the NFL, but he might stay outside for certain teams. He's a smooth mover, an excellent athlete and his tape against Alabama (particularly Tim Williams) was awesome. I'm looking forward to watching him more at the Senior Bowl next week.


                    23. Quincy Wilson, CB, Florida*

                    Grade: 88

                    Some scouts I've talked to think Wilson's ceiling is higher than fellow Gators cornerback Teez Tabor (No. 15 on this list). At 6-1, Wilson has a good length/speed combination, and he's experienced, with 39 games played, including 24 starts.


                    24. Jarrad Davis, OLB, Florida

                    Grade: 88

                    Davis was hampered by an ankle injury toward the end of the season, but when healthy, he finds so many ways to affect a game. He makes plays in the backfield (six tackles for loss and five QB hurries) and is athletic enough to hold up in coverage. Davis reminds me a little of Bucs OLB Kwon Alexander because of his excellent range and relentless motor.


                    25. Caleb Brantley, DT, Florida*

                    Grade: 88

                    Brantley is more of a disruptor than someone who is going to put up eye-popping production. He has a good combination of quickness and functional strength to excel as an interior player at the next level. When at his best -- as he was in back-to-back games against LSU and Florida State (5.0 tackles for loss) -- Brantley can be a load to handle in the running game.


                    26. Cam Robinson, OT, Alabama*

                    Grade: 88

                    Robinson drives defenders off the ball, particularly in the running game, when he's playing with leverage. But I'd like to see more consistency in pass protection, and teams will need to investigate Robinson's character after an arrest in May 2016 for possession of marijuana and illegal possession of a stolen firearm (charges were eventually dropped).


                    27. D'Onta Foreman, RB, Texas*

                    Grade: 88

                    Foreman's stock exploded this season, as he ranked first in the FBS with 184.4 rushing yards per game. At 6-1 and 249 pounds, Foreman is a load to bring down, and he has really good feet for his size. He creates a ton of yards after contact, and he doesn't get tackled in the backfield often. As a bonus, Foreman is excellent in pass protection.


                    28. Mitch Trubisky, QB, North Carolina*

                    Grade: 87

                    In his first year as a full-time starter, Trubisky has shown good accuracy (68.0 completion percentage) and an ability to limit mistakes (only nine turnovers all season). Trubisky's 13 career starts are a bit concerning, as the history of quarterbacks leaving school early without a ton of game reps isn't great (just look at Mark Sanchez). But with the lack of top-end talent in this draft class -- and the number of teams drafting in the top 10 that need new blood at the position -- Trubisky could still be a top-10 pick come April.


                    29. Budda Baker, S, Washington*

                    Grade: 87

                    At 5-10 and 192 pounds, Baker is an undersized safety prospect, but when you watch the film, he's all over the field. A three-year starter, Baker was the only Pac-12 defensive back to finish this season with double-digit tackles for loss. He also added two interceptions and six pass breakups.


                    30. Tre'Davious White, CB, LSU

                    Grade: 87

                    White is one of the most experienced players in this class, having started 47 games in his LSU career. He has elite football instincts and a good overall feel for route combinations. He doesn't have great ball production (just six career interceptions), but he brings added value as a punt returner, scoring a return TD in each of the past three seasons.


                    31. Christian McCaffrey, RB, Stanford*

                    Grade: 87

                    McCaffrey finished his Stanford career on a tear against some overmatched defenses (222.4 total yards per game and 12 TDs in his final five contests). From rushing to receiving to returning, McCaffrey was asked to do a ton for the Cardinal, and he delivered with a rare combination of vision, lateral agility and acceleration.


                    32. Malik McDowell, DT, Michigan State*

                    Grade: 87

                    McDowell missed the regular season's final three games because of an ankle injury, and before that, his film and production (1.5 sacks, 7.0 tackles for loss) had taken a dive from last season. He just isn't the consistent grinder who typically comes out of Michigan State. But McDowell has elite athleticism and can play multiple positions along the D-line at the next level.
                    In 2016 Brock Osweiler was rated last (32nd) among all QBs (>400 attempts) by ProFootballFocus and ranked 33rd/34 QBs (>200 attempts) by Football Outsiders.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      McShay's top 2017 NFL prospects by position

                      Todd McShayESPN
                      As we sit less than a week from Senior Bowl practices in Mobile, Alabama, let's take a look at the top 10 players at every position in the 2017 NFL draft.

                      If you want to see which of these players made my latest Top 32, check it out here.

                      Note: Underclassmen are marked with an asterisk.

                      Quarterbacks

                      1. *Mitch Trubisky, North Carolina
                      2. *DeShone Kizer, Notre Dame
                      3. *Deshaun Watson, Clemson
                      4. *Brad Kaaya, Miami (Fla.)
                      5. *Patrick Mahomes II, Texas Tech
                      6. C.J. Beathard, Iowa
                      7. Chad Kelly, Mississippi
                      8. *Jerod Evans, Virginia Tech
                      9. Nathan Peterman, Pittsburgh
                      10. Seth Russell, Baylor

                      None of these guys carries a first-round grade, though that could certainly change as we get further in the evaluation process. Watson had another great showing against Alabama in the College Football Playoff National Championship Game, but it didn't boost his stock much on my board.

                      Running backs

                      1. *Leonard Fournette, LSU
                      2. *Dalvin Cook, Florida State
                      3. *D'Onta Foreman, Texas
                      4. *Christian McCaffrey, Stanford
                      5. *Alvin Kamara, Tennessee
                      6. *Wayne Gallman, Clemson
                      7. *Samaje Perine, Oklahoma
                      8. *Joe Mixon, Oklahoma
                      9. *Marlon Mack, South Florida
                      10. *James Conner, Pitt

                      Don't forget about Cook amid all the Fournette hype. He has a really unique skill set and reminds me a bit of Chris Johnson in his heyday.

                      Wide receivers

                      1. *Mike Williams, Clemson
                      2. *John Ross, Washington
                      3. Corey Davis, Western Michigan
                      4. *JuJu Smith-Schuster, USC
                      5. *Curtis Samuel, Ohio State
                      6. *ArDarius Stewart, Alabama
                      7. Cooper Kupp, Eastern Washington
                      8. *Isaiah Ford, Virginia Tech
                      9. Dede Westbrook, Oklahoma
                      10. *Malachi Dupree, LSU

                      Davis makes his debut in the Top 32 this week and bumps slightly ahead of Smith-Schuster here. Williams cemented his status as the No. 1 WR in this class with a great championship game performance against Alabama.

                      Tight ends

                      1. *David Njoku, Miami (Fla.)
                      2. O.J. Howard, Alabama
                      3. *Bucky Hodges, Virginia Tech
                      4. Jake Butt, Michigan
                      5. Jordan Leggett, Clemson
                      6. Cole Hikutini, Louisville
                      7. Gerald Everett, South Alabama
                      8. Jeremy Sprinkle, Arkansas
                      9. Evan Engram, Mississippi
                      10. Pharaoh Brown, Oregon

                      This is a great tight end class, highlighted by the rise of Njoku, our new No. 1 player at the position. He popped off the screen when I watched his tape after the season.

                      Offensive tackles

                      1. *Ryan Ramczyk, Wisconsin
                      2. *Cam Robinson, Alabama
                      3. *Garett Bolles, Utah
                      4. *Roderick Johnson, Florida State
                      5. Chad Wheeler, USC
                      6. Dion Dawkins, Temple
                      7. Jon Heck, North Carolina
                      8. Adam Bisnowaty, Pittsburgh
                      9. Zach Banner, USC
                      10. Conor McDermott, UCLA

                      Ramczyk had a breakout season at Wisconsin and moves ahead of Robinson on this list, despite news that he underwent hip surgery that will keep him from working out at the combine.

                      Offensive guards

                      1. Forrest Lamp, Western Kentucky
                      2. Dan Feeney, Indiana
                      3. Caleb Peterson, North Carolina
                      4. *Brian Allen, Michigan State
                      5. Dorian Johnson, Pittsburgh
                      6. *Damien Mama, USC
                      7. Greg Pyke, Georgia
                      8. *David Sharpe, Florida
                      9. Taylor Moton, Western Michigan
                      10. Kyle Kalis, Michigan

                      Notre Dame's Quenton Nelson was my No. 1 guard all season, but he opted to return to South Bend. Lamp takes over the top spot. We project him as a guard after he played the majority of his 51 college starts at left tackle.

                      Centers

                      1. Ethan Pocic, LSU
                      2. Pat Elflein, Ohio State
                      3. Cameron Tom, Southern Mississippi
                      4. Tyler Orlosky, West Virginia
                      5. Jay Guillermo, Clemson
                      6. Jon Toth, Kentucky
                      7. Chase Roullier, Wyoming
                      8. Kyle Fuller, Baylor

                      Pocic and Elflein will both enter the NFL with a lot of starting experience, and you can tell from watching their tape that they've played a ton of football.

                      Defensive ends

                      1. *Myles Garrett, Texas A&M
                      2. *Solomon Thomas, Stanford
                      3. *Derek Barnett, Tennessee
                      4. Taco Charlton, Michigan
                      5. *Charles Harris, Missouri
                      6. DeMarcus Walker, Florida State
                      7. *Carl Lawson, Auburn
                      8. Dawaune Smoot, Illinois
                      9. Deatrich Wise Jr., Arkansas
                      10. *Tyquan Lewis, Ohio State

                      If you need a pass-rusher, you're in luck. Four of my top 16 players in this class are defensive ends. Thomas, who flashed a ton of promise this season for Stanford, is one of the biggest risers in the whole draft.

                      Defensive tackles

                      1. Jonathan Allen, Alabama
                      2. *Caleb Brantley, Florida
                      3. *Malik McDowell, Michigan State
                      4. *Elijah Qualls, Washington
                      5. *Nazair Jones, North Carolina
                      6. Chris Wormley, Michigan
                      7. *Lowell Lotulelei, Utah
                      8. Jaleel Johnson, Iowa
                      9. *Charles Walker, Oklahoma
                      10. Carlos Watkins, Clemson

                      We are officially moving Allen from defensive end to defensive tackle. He's the best interior pass-rusher in this class, but there's a bit of a drop-off after him (none of the other DTs has a first-round grade right now).

                      Inside linebackers

                      1. Reuben Foster, Alabama
                      2. *Raekwon McMillan, Ohio State
                      3. *Anthony Walker Jr., Northwestern
                      4. *Zach Cunningham, Vanderbilt
                      5. Kendell Beckwith, LSU
                      6. Alex Anzalone, Florida
                      7. Keith Kelsey, Louisville
                      8. Ben Boulware, Clemson
                      9. Riley Bullough, Michigan State
                      10. Hardy Nickerson, Illinois

                      This group gets pretty thin in a hurry, with only three inside linebackers garnering first- or second-round grades. Foster is a stud, though, and could go in the top 10.

                      Outside linebackers

                      1. Takkarist McKinley, UCLA
                      2. Jarrad Davis, Florida
                      3. Tim Williams, Alabama
                      4. Ryan Anderson, Alabama
                      5. *T.J. Watt, Wisconsin
                      6. Devonte Fields, Louisville
                      7. Jalen Reeves-Maybin, Tennessee
                      8. *Elijah Lee, Kansas State
                      9. Josh Carraway, TCU
                      10. Ejuan Price, Pittsburgh

                      Anderson showed that he's a true difference-maker in the CFP National Championship Game, racking up 2.0 tackles for loss (including one sack).

                      Cornerbacks

                      1. *Marshon Lattimore, Ohio State
                      2. *Teez Tabor, Florida
                      3. *Sidney Jones, Washington
                      4. *Quincy Wilson, Florida
                      5. Tre'Davious White, LSU
                      6. *Marlon Humphrey, Alabama
                      7. Jourdan Lewis, Michigan
                      8. *Adoree' Jackson, USC
                      9. Gareon Conley, Ohio State
                      10. Desmond King, Iowa

                      This is a talented group, with all 10 players getting at least a second-round grade. Lattimore has just one year of starting experience, but he has a ton of raw potential.

                      Safeties

                      1. *Jamal Adams, LSU
                      2. *Malik Hooker, Ohio State
                      3. *Jabrill Peppers, Michigan
                      4. *Budda Baker, Washington
                      5. *Marcus Williams, Utah
                      6. Marcus Maye, Florida
                      7. Justin Evans, Texas A&M
                      8. *Josh Jones, NC State
                      9. Tony Conner, Mississippi
                      10. *Montae Nicholson, Michigan State

                      Adams is an in-the-box thumper, and Hooker is more of a true center-field type, but they're both very effective. The top three players here all rank in my top 12 overall.
                      In 2016 Brock Osweiler was rated last (32nd) among all QBs (>400 attempts) by ProFootballFocus and ranked 33rd/34 QBs (>200 attempts) by Football Outsiders.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        McShay's Top 32: Alabama's O.J. Howard rising fast

                        Todd McShayESPN Senior Writer
                        Here, we'll look at which players have moved up and down our top 32, drawing on the same scouting reports as before and making changes where necessary.

                        We'll continue to update our board as we get closer to the 2017 NFL draft and complete our evaluations. Although it's a given that some players will move into the rankings and others will drop out, this provides a good snapshot of which players currently have the most NFL potential, based on our evaluations.

                        Note: Underclassmen are marked with an asterisk.
                        1. Myles Garrett, DE, Texas A&M*

                        Grade: 95

                        Garrett is the best pure pass-rusher in the 2017 draft. He played through an ankle injury for much of this season and still finished tied for sixth in the SEC with 15.0 tackles for loss (including 8.5 sacks). He has a lethal combination of first-step quickness, bend, power and hand-to-hand combat skills. After adding 10 pounds of muscle last offseason, he has been stronger setting the edge in the running game.

                        2. Jonathan Allen, DT, Alabama

                        Grade: 94

                        Allen had 8.5 tackles for loss in his final five games. He's a true game-wrecker, with 15 QB hurries and 10.5 sacks. Allen's excellent combination of quickness and power makes him one of the best interior pass-rushers we've studied in this draft class. He constantly pushes the pocket and brings tremendous experience to the table, with 56 games played.

                        3. Leonard Fournette, RB, LSU*

                        Grade: 94

                        Fournette, who had a nagging ankle injury all season, finished with only 144 touches, far below the 319 he had the season before. That works to his benefit from a wear-and-tear standpoint. When fully healthy, Fournette is a big-play machine with a rare combination of size, power, agility and speed for the position. His angry running style is something at which to marvel, and it will translate well to the next level.


                        4. Jamal Adams, S, LSU*

                        Grade: 93

                        Adams is one of the most complete players in this class. He's a difference-maker as an in-the-box defender, racking up 7.0 tackles for loss in his last seven games. Adams has an excellent blend of size, length and athleticism, and it shows up on tape.

                        5. Solomon Thomas, DE, Stanford*

                        Grade: 93

                        Thomas' combination of quickness and power pops off the screen and helped make him one of the biggest draft risers this season. At 6-foot-3 and 273 pounds, he has good size and strength and he's stout against the run (15.0 tackles for loss, 8.0 sacks and seven QB hurries).

                        6. Malik Hooker, S, Ohio State*

                        Grade: 92

                        Hooker confirmed that he had surgery this week on his labrum and for a hernia, and will miss the combine. That shouldn't affect his draft stock too much. Only two players in college football had more interceptions this season than Hooker's seven picks. In his first season as a starter in Columbus, Hooker showed great instincts and range in coverage. He always seems to be around the ball.

                        7. Marshon Lattimore, CB, Ohio State*

                        Grade: 92

                        A first-year starter, Lattimore is more naturally gifted than former Ohio State CB Eli Apple, who went No. 10 overall to the Giants in the 2016 draft. At 6-foot, 192 pounds, Lattimore has good length and fluid movement skills. He took full advantage of his spike in playing time, with four interceptions and nine pass breakups this season.

                        8. Dalvin Cook, RB, Florida State*

                        Grade: 92

                        Cook, who ranked second in the FBS with 2,253 total yards this season, can truly do it all. He makes defenders miss with subtle changes in direction, and he doesn't need much of a crease to rattle off a big play. At 5-11, 213 pounds, Cook is a big play waiting to happen (18 touches of 25 yards or more this season, tied for first among all Power 5 RBs).

                        9. Reuben Foster, ILB, Alabama

                        Grade: 92

                        Foster is one of the better inside linebacker prospects in recent memory. He flies to the ball, and when he gets there, he shows explosive tackling ability. Foster had 11.5 tackles for loss in his last 10 games and 30 more total tackles this season than his next-best teammate. For a player his size (240 pounds), Foster shows a good combination of agility and speed.

                        10. Taco Charlton, DE, Michigan

                        Grade: 91

                        Charlton finished the season on a tear, compiling 10 sacks in his final 10 games. He has always had the raw ability, but this past season he showed more consistency and refined technique. Charlton has the ability to be an edge defender in either a 3-4 or 4-3 scheme in the NFL.

                        11. Mike Williams, WR, Clemson*

                        Grade: 91

                        Williams physically dominated against Alabama in the CFP National Championship, winning on underneath routes and soaring over the top for a few big plays. He closed out his Clemson career with 11 touchdowns in his final 12 games and showed all the skills you look for in a legit No. 1 NFL wide receiver. He has an excellent ability to create late separation when the ball is in the air. At 6-3, Williams has a good size-speed combination.

                        12. O.J. Howard, TE, Alabama

                        Grade: 91

                        Howard was the best player on the field all week at the Senior Bowl, showing great athleticism for a guy who measured just over 6-foot-5 and 249 pounds. He has a lot of upside as a big-play threat in the NFL. Don't forget: This is the guy who lit up Clemson in two consecutive CFP National Championships (314 receiving yards and three TDs). He should thrive in a more pass-heavy NFL system.

                        13. Jabrill Peppers, S, Michigan*

                        Grade: 91

                        Peppers is a polarizing player because it's a little tricky to find a true position for him, but I see him as a great fit for the modern NFL. He has the speed and athleticism to thrive in space and the toughness to play bigger than his 205-pound frame. Think of Peppers as a hybrid player at the next level -- a Deone Bucannon-type -- who can help your team in a lot of ways (he finished the regular season with 15.0 tackles for loss, 3.5 sacks, seven QB hurries, three rushing TDs and one punt-return TD). The biggest concern for me is his lack of ball production at Michigan; he has only one career interception.

                        14. Teez Tabor, CB, Florida*

                        Grade: 90

                        Tabor has some of the best ball skills among cornerbacks in this draft class, with four interceptions, six pass breakups and a defensive TD in 12 games this past season. His technique still has some room to grow, but it's hard to ignore Tabor's natural anticipation and elite production, including five interceptions and 22 pass breakups in the two seasons before this one.

                        15. Ryan Ramczyk, OT, Wisconsin*

                        Grade: 90

                        Ramczyk transferred to Wisconsin after two seasons at UW-Stevens Points (Division III), and he was dominant this season. With an ideal frame (6-6, 314 pounds) and long arms, Ramczyk proved to be consistent as a run-blocker and in pass protection. He played through a hip injury this season that he eventually had surgery to repair on Jan. 5.

                        16. David Njoku, TE, Miami (Fla.)*

                        Grade: 90

                        Njoku was the biggest surprise of our early evaluations. A good college player who has the potential to develop into a better pro, Njoku is loaded with talent. He averaged 16.2 yards per reception and caught a TD once in every 5.4 receptions. He could be the first tight end off the board. At the very least, he's a clear-cut first-rounder from a talent perspective.

                        17. Derek Barnett, DE, Tennessee*

                        Grade: 90

                        Barnett led the SEC in both tackles for loss (19.0) and sacks (13.0). Perhaps more impressive, all but one of his sacks came against SEC opponents. Barnett is efficient at keeping blockers off his frame, and he plays with good discipline, a consistent motor and impressive physicality. He has terrific intangibles and finds a way to affect the game in multiple ways with his natural instincts.

                        18. Sidney Jones, CB, Washington

                        Grade: 89

                        At 6-foot and 181 pounds, Jones is long and a smooth mover, but he needs to get stronger. He has shown the ability to play press coverage and is also adept at playing off-coverage. Jones -- who had three interceptions, six pass breakups and two forced fumbles this season -- is physical for a smaller-framed guy, too.

                        19. Takkarist McKinley, OLB, UCLA

                        Grade: 89

                        McKinley has been one of this season's biggest draft risers. He parlayed his elite speed off the edge into 18.0 tackles for loss and 10.0 sacks in 11 games (both of which finished second in the Pac-12). To put that in perspective, McKinley had 11.0 total TFLs and 7.0 sacks in his first two seasons combined. He brings a ton of upside to the table.

                        20. John Ross, WR, Washington

                        Grade: 89

                        Ross has always had great speed, but he improved his route running this season and saw immediate dividends with 17 touchdowns. His stock shot up after he showed the ability to handle physical coverage. If he runs as fast as expected at the NFL combine, Ross could very well be a first-rounder.

                        21. Corey Davis, WR, Western Michigan

                        Grade: 88

                        Davis stands 6-2, 205 pounds and can apparently run in the 4.4s. If he does so at the combine, he will probably be a first-round pick. Davis was hugely productive in college -- 332 catches, 5,285 yards, 15.9 yards per catch and 52 touchdowns. Plus, he had 73 yards and a TD against Wisconsin, the toughest competition he has faced.

                        22. Tre'Davious White, CB, LSU

                        Grade: 88

                        White is one of the most experienced players in this class, having started 47 games in his LSU career. His elite football instincts and a good overall feel for route combinations were on full display last week at the Senior Bowl before he tweaked his ankle and missed the final day of practice and the game. White doesn't have great ball production (only six career interceptions), but he brings added value as a punt returner, scoring a return TD in each of the past three seasons.

                        23. Forrest Lamp, G, Western Kentucky

                        Grade: 88

                        Lamp also went down because of an ankle injury during last week's Senior Bowl practices. The measurables -- specifically his shorter arms (31 inches) -- confirmed that he's a guard in the NFL. Lamp started 51 total games for Western Kentucky, most of which were at left tackle. He's a smooth mover, an excellent athlete and his tape against Alabama (particularly Tim Williams) was awesome.

                        24. Caleb Brantley, DT, Florida*

                        Grade: 88

                        Brantley is more of a disruptor than someone who is going to put up eye-popping production. He has a good combination of quickness and functional strength to excel as an interior player at the next level. When at his best -- as he was in back-to-back games against LSU and Florida State (5.0 tackles for loss) -- Brantley can be a load to handle in the running game.

                        25. Jarrad Davis, OLB, Florida

                        Grade: 88

                        Davis was hampered by an ankle injury toward the end of the season, but when healthy, he finds so many ways to affect a game. He makes plays in the backfield (six tackles for loss and five QB hurries) and is athletic enough to hold up in coverage. Davis reminds me a little of Bucs OLB Kwon Alexander because of his excellent range and relentless motor.

                        26. Budda Baker, S, Washington*

                        Grade: 87

                        At 5-10 and 192 pounds, Baker is an undersized safety prospect, but when you watch the film, he's all over the field. A three-year starter, Baker was the only Pac-12 defensive back to finish this season with double-digit tackles for loss. He also had two interceptions and six pass breakups.

                        27. Mitch Trubisky, QB, North Carolina*

                        Grade: 87

                        In his first year as a full-time starter, Trubisky showed good accuracy (68.0 completion percentage) and an ability to limit mistakes (only nine turnovers all season). Trubisky's 13 career starts are a bit concerning, as the history of quarterbacks leaving school early without a ton of game reps isn't great (just look at Mark Sanchez). But with the lack of top-end talent in this draft class -- and the number of teams drafting in the top 10 that need new blood at the position -- Trubisky could still be a top-10 pick come April.

                        28. Christian McCaffrey, RB, Stanford*

                        Grade: 87

                        McCaffrey finished his Stanford career on a tear against some overmatched defenses (222.4 total yards per game and 12 TDs in his final five contests). From rushing to receiving to returning, McCaffrey was asked to do a ton for the Cardinal, and he delivered with a rare combination of vision, lateral agility and acceleration.

                        29. Charles Harris, DE, Missouri*

                        Grade: 87

                        Harris had 5.5 sacks, six QB hurries and a forced fumble in his final four games. That came after he led the SEC with 18.5 tackles for loss in 2015. A twitchy athlete off the edge, Harris is just scratching the surface as a pass-rusher. If he adds some bulk to his frame, watch out.

                        30. Quincy Wilson, CB, Florida*

                        Grade: 87

                        Some scouts I've talked to think Wilson's ceiling is higher than fellow Gators cornerback Teez Tabor (No. 14 on this list). At 6-1, Wilson has a good length/speed combination, and he's experienced, with 39 games played, including 24 starts.

                        31. Malik McDowell, DT, Michigan State*

                        Grade: 87

                        McDowell missed the regular season's final three games because of an ankle injury, and before that, his film and production (1.5 sacks, 7.0 tackles for loss) had taken a dive from last season. He just isn't the consistent grinder who typically comes out of Michigan State. But McDowell has elite athleticism and can play multiple positions along the D-line at the next level.

                        32. Tim Williams, OLB, Alabama

                        Grade: 87

                        Williams is another player who has dropped a little bit on my board because of some concerns about his consistency. He certainly made his fair share of smash plays -- 14.5 tackles for loss in his final 10 games -- but he also disappeared from stretches. While Williams has excellent first-step quickness, explosive power and a really high ceiling, teams will have to take into account his character. He was arrested earlier this season on a misdemeanor gun charge.

                        McShay discovers Howard.

                        Grades are funny.
                        Last edited by H2O4me; 02-03-2017, 11:25 AM.
                        In 2016 Brock Osweiler was rated last (32nd) among all QBs (>400 attempts) by ProFootballFocus and ranked 33rd/34 QBs (>200 attempts) by Football Outsiders.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          McShay reports he's "grinding away at game tape" with prospects racing up and down his big board...



                          McShay's Top 32: Mike Williams, Corey Davis in tight race for No. 1 WR

                          Here we'll look at which players have moved up and down our top 32, drawing on the same scouting reports as before and making changes where necessary.

                          We'll continue to update our board as we get closer to the 2017 NFL draft and complete our evaluations. Although it's a given that some players will move into the rankings and others will drop out, this provides a good snapshot of which players currently have the most NFL potential, based on our evaluations.

                          To see our top 10 players at each position, check out this article.

                          Note: Underclassmen are marked with an asterisk.


                          1. Myles Garrett, DE, Texas A&M*

                          Grade: 95

                          Garrett is the best pure pass-rusher in the 2017 draft. He played through an ankle injury for much of this season and still finished tied for sixth in the SEC with 15.0 tackles for loss (including 8.5 sacks). He has a lethal combination of first-step quickness, bend, power and hand-to-hand combat skills. After adding 10 pounds of muscle last offseason, he was stronger setting the edge versus the run.


                          2. Jonathan Allen, DT, Alabama

                          Grade: 94

                          Allen had 8.5 tackles for loss in his final five games. He's a true game-wrecker, with 15 quarterback hurries and 10.5 sacks. Allen's excellent combination of quickness and power makes him one of the best interior pass-rushers we've studied in this draft class. He constantly pushes the pocket and brings tremendous experience to the table, with 56 games played.


                          3. Leonard Fournette, RB, LSU*

                          Grade: 94

                          Fournette, who had a nagging ankle injury all season, finished with only 144 touches, far below the 319 he had the season before. That works to his benefit from a wear-and-tear standpoint. When fully healthy, Fournette is a big-play machine with a rare combination of size, power, agility and speed for the position. His angry running style is something at which to marvel, and it will translate well to the next level.


                          4. Jamal Adams, S, LSU*

                          Grade: 93

                          Adams is one of the most complete players in this class. He's a difference-maker as an in-the-box defender, racking up 7.0 tackles for loss in his last seven games. Adams has an excellent blend of size, length and athleticism, and it shows up on tape.


                          5. Solomon Thomas, DE, Stanford*

                          Grade: 93

                          Thomas' combination of quickness and power pops off the screen and helped make him one of the biggest draft risers this season. At 6-foot-3 and 273 pounds, he has good size and strength, and he's stout against the run (15.0 tackles for loss, 8.0 sacks and seven quarterback hurries).


                          6. Marshon Lattimore, CB, Ohio State*

                          Grade: 92

                          A first-year starter, Lattimore has truly elite cover skills, and he's more naturally gifted than former Ohio State cornerback Eli Apple, who went No. 10 overall to the Giants in the 2016 draft. At 6-foot, 192 pounds, Lattimore has good length and fluid movement skills. He took full advantage of his spike in playing time, with four interceptions and nine pass breakups this season.


                          7. Dalvin Cook, RB, Florida State*

                          Grade: 92

                          Cook, who ranked second in the FBS with 2,253 total yards this season, truly can do it all. He makes defenders miss with subtle changes in direction, and he doesn't need much of a crease to rattle off a big play. At 5-foot-11, 213 pounds, Cook is a big play waiting to happen (18 touches of 25 yards or more in 2016, tied for first among all Power 5 running backs).


                          8. Malik Hooker, S, Ohio State*

                          Grade: 92

                          Hooker will miss the combine after having surgery on his labrum and for a hernia. That shouldn't affect his draft stock too much. Only two players in college football had more interceptions this season than Hooker's seven picks. In his first season as a starter in Columbus, Hooker showed great instincts and range in coverage. He always seems to be around the ball.


                          9. Reuben Foster, ILB, Alabama

                          Grade: 92

                          Foster is one of the better inside linebacker prospects in recent memory. He flies to the ball, and when he gets there, he shows explosive tackling ability. Foster had 11.5 tackles for loss in his final 10 games and 30 more total tackles this past season than his next-best teammate. For a player his size (240 pounds), Foster shows a good combination of agility and speed.


                          10. O.J. Howard, TE, Alabama

                          Grade: 91

                          Howard was the best player on the field all week at the Senior Bowl, showing great athleticism for a guy who measured just over 6-foot-5 and 249 pounds. He has a lot of upside as a big-play threat in the NFL. Although his route-running could use a little refinement, Howard has shown the ability to shine on the biggest stages (314 receiving yards and three touchdowns versus Clemson in the past two CFP title games). He should thrive in a more pass-heavy NFL system.


                          11. Taco Charlton, DE, Michigan

                          Grade: 91

                          Charlton finished the season on a tear, compiling 10 sacks in his final 10 games. He has always had the raw ability, but this past season he showed more consistency and refined technique. Charlton has the ability to be an edge defender in either a 3-4 or 4-3 scheme in the NFL.


                          12. Mike Williams, WR, Clemson*

                          Grade: 91

                          Williams physically dominated against Alabama in the CFP National Championship, winning on underneath routes and soaring over the top for a few big plays. He closed his Clemson career with 11 touchdowns in his final 12 games and showed all the skills you look for in a legit No. 1 NFL wide receiver. Standing 6-foot-3 and possessing good speed, Williams has the excellent ability to create late separation when the ball is in the air.


                          13. Jabrill Peppers, S, Michigan*

                          Grade: 91

                          Peppers is a polarizing player because it's a little tricky to find a true position for him, but I see him as a great fit for the modern NFL. He has the speed and athleticism to thrive in space and the toughness to play bigger than his 205-pound frame. Think of Peppers as a hybrid player at the next level -- a Deone Bucannon-type -- who can help your team in a lot of ways (he finished the regular season with 15.0 tackles for loss, 3.5 sacks, seven quarterback hurries, three rushing TDs and one punt-return TD). The biggest concern for me is his lack of ball production at Michigan; he has only one career interception.


                          14. Corey Davis, WR, Western Michigan

                          Grade: 90

                          Davis' speed really stands out on tape. He looks like a guy who will run in the 4.4s at his pro day (he's sitting out the combine after ankle surgery). If that's the case, he has a chance to be a top-10 pick due to his size (6-foot-2, 205 pounds) and college production. Davis had 332 catches, 5,285 yards and 52 touchdowns at Western Michigan. Yes, he was playing mostly against MAC competition, but he dominated like you'd expect from an elite talent.


                          15. Malik McDowell, DT, Michigan State*

                          Grade: 90

                          McDowell is arguably the best interior pass-rusher in this class. He didn't play with the same passion and toughness this past season, which could cause him to slip a bit. But McDowell has elite athleticism and can play multiple positions along the D-line at the next level. He could be a steal in the mid-to-late first round if he lands with the right coaching staff to develop him and keep him motivated.


                          16. David Njoku, TE, Miami (Fla.)*

                          Grade: 90

                          A good college player who has the potential to develop into a better pro, Njoku is loaded with talent. He averaged 16.2 yards per reception and caught a touchdown pass once every 5.4 receptions. He could be the first tight end off the board. At the very least, he's a clear-cut first-rounder, from a talent perspective.


                          17. Ryan Ramczyk, OT, Wisconsin*

                          Grade: 90

                          Ramczyk has the best tape of any offensive lineman in this class, But he also has just one year of major college experience after transferring to Wisconsin from UW-Stevens Points (Division III). With an ideal frame (6-foot-6, 314 pounds) and long arms, Ramczyk proved to be consistent as a run-blocker and in pass protection. He played through a hip injury this season that he eventually had surgery to repair on Jan. 5.


                          18. Teez Tabor, CB, Florida*

                          Grade: 90

                          Tabor has some of the best ball skills among cornerbacks in this draft class, with four interceptions, six pass breakups and a defensive TD in 12 games this past season. He allowed a few too many big plays, and his technique still has some room to grow, but it's hard to ignore Tabor's natural anticipation and elite production. He had five interceptions and 22 pass breakups in the two seasons before this past one.


                          19. Derek Barnett, DE, Tennessee*

                          Grade: 90

                          Barnett isn't expected to put up elite workout numbers, which could cause him to slip a bit. But he plays with good discipline, a consistent motor and impressive physicality. He led the SEC in both tackles for loss (19.0) and sacks (13.0). He has terrific intangibles and finds a way to affect the game in multiple ways with his natural instincts.


                          20. Sidney Jones, CB, Washington

                          Grade: 89

                          At 6-foot and 181 pounds, Jones is long and a smooth mover, but he needs to get stronger. He has shown the ability to play press coverage and is also adept at playing off-coverage. Jones -- who had three interceptions, six pass breakups and two forced fumbles this season -- is physical for a smaller-framed guy too.


                          21. Takkarist McKinley, OLB, UCLA

                          Grade: 89

                          McKinley parlayed his elite speed off the edge into 18.0 tackles for loss and 10.0 sacks in 11 games this past season (both of which were second in the Pac-12). To put that in perspective, McKinley had 11.0 total TFLs and 7.0 sacks in his first two seasons combined. He brings a ton of upside to the table.


                          22. Tre'Davious White, CB, LSU

                          Grade: 88

                          White is one of the most experienced players in this class, having started 47 games in his LSU career. His elite football instincts and good overall feel for route combinations were on full display at the Senior Bowl, before he tweaked his ankle and missed the final day of practice and the game. White doesn't have great ball production (only six career interceptions), but he brings added value as a punt returner, scoring a return TD in each of the past three seasons.


                          23. Jarrad Davis, OLB, Florida

                          Grade: 88

                          At 6-foot-2 and 238 pounds, Davis' best fit is at weak-side linebacker. He's an explosive athlete with great range who profiles as an every-down player in the NFL. He could also play middle linebacker if he bulked up a bit. Davis, who reminds me a little of Bucs OLB Kwon Alexander, finds so many ways to affect a game.


                          24. Forrest Lamp, G, Western Kentucky

                          Grade: 88

                          Lamp's Senior Bowl measurables -- specifically his shorter arms (31 inches) -- confirmed that he's a guard in the NFL. Lamp started 51 total games for Western Kentucky, most of which were at left tackle. He's a smooth mover and an excellent athlete, and his tape against Alabama (particularly Tim Williams) was awesome.


                          25. Caleb Brantley, DT, Florida*

                          Grade: 88

                          Brantley is more of a disruptor than someone who is going to put up eye-popping production. He has a good combination of quickness and functional strength to excel as an interior player at the next level. When at his best -- as he was in back-to-back games against LSU and Florida State (5.0 tackles for loss) -- Brantley can be a load to handle in the running game.


                          26. Budda Baker, S, Washington*

                          Grade: 87

                          At 5-foot-10 and 192 pounds, Baker is an undersized safety prospect, but when you watch the film, he's all over the field. A three-year starter, Baker was the only Pac-12 defensive back to finish this season with double-digit tackles for loss. He also had two interceptions and six pass breakups.


                          27. Mitch Trubisky, QB, North Carolina*

                          Grade: 87

                          There's a lot to like about Trubisky's tape. He flashes the ability to go through progressions, and he's the most accurate quarterback in this class. I like Trubisky's mobility but have concerns about what his real size is and some of the critical errors he made, including two bad interceptions versus Stanford. Trubisky's 13 career starts are also concerning; the history of quarterbacks leaving school early without a ton of game reps isn't great (just look at Mark Sanchez). But with the lack of top-end talent in this draft class and the number of teams drafting in the top 10 that need new blood at the position, Trubisky could be a high pick come April.


                          28. Quincy Wilson, CB, Florida*

                          Grade: 87

                          Wilson was overshadowed by fellow Florida CB Teez Tabor (No. 18 on this list) this past season, but some scouts I've talked to think Wilson has the higher ceiling of the two. At 6-foot-1, Wilson has a good length/speed combination, and he's experienced, with 39 games played, including 24 starts.


                          29. Alvin Kamara, RB, Tennessee*

                          Grade: 87

                          Kamara is an underrated talent who will continue to rise as we get closer to the draft. He has the vision and lateral quickness you look for in a runner and the power to break a lot of tackles. Kamara averaged 6.2 yards per carry, showing the ability to create plays on his own, which is among the most important things a back can do.


                          30. Cam Robinson, OT, Alabama

                          Grade: 87

                          Robinson has the ability to be a road-grader in the run game at the next level. The biggest question is whether he can hold up consistently enough as a pass-blocker to play left tackle. Teams will also need to investigate Robinson's character after an arrest in May 2016 for possession of marijuana and illegal possession of a stolen firearm (charges were eventually dropped).


                          31. Charles Harris, DE, Missouri*

                          Grade: 87

                          Harris had 5.5 sacks, six quarterback hurries and a forced fumble in his final four games. Those came after he led the SEC with 18.5 tackles for loss in 2015. A twitchy athlete off the edge, Harris is just scratching the surface as a pass-rusher. He profiles as a fringe first-rounder.


                          32. John Ross, WR, Washington

                          Grade: 87

                          Ross has always had great speed, but he improved his route running this season and saw immediate dividends with 17 touchdowns. He also showed the ability to handle physical coverage. Ross could very well be a first-rounder if he runs as fast as expected at the NFL combine. He's expected to participate in most combine drills, despite being scheduled to have labrum surgery in March.
                          In 2016 Brock Osweiler was rated last (32nd) among all QBs (>400 attempts) by ProFootballFocus and ranked 33rd/34 QBs (>200 attempts) by Football Outsiders.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            McShay's top 2017 NFL prospects by position

                            With just two weeks until the start of the NFL combine, let's take another look at the top 10 players at every position for the 2017 NFL draft.

                            Note: Underclassmen are marked with an asterisk.

                            Quarterbacks

                            1. *Mitch Trubisky, North Carolina
                            2. *Deshaun Watson, Clemson
                            3. *DeShone Kizer, Notre Dame
                            4. *Brad Kaaya, Miami (Fla.)
                            5. Nathan Peterman, Pittsburgh
                            6. *Patrick Mahomes II, Texas Tech
                            7. C.J. Beathard, Iowa
                            8. Chad Kelly, Mississippi
                            9. Davis Webb, California
                            10. Seth Russell, Baylor

                            Peterman is the big riser among this group after a great showing at the Senior Bowl. Because of his below-average arm strength, Peterman is a better fit for a short-to-intermediate passing game. He shows nice anticipation and has a really good poise about him.

                            Running backs

                            1. *Leonard Fournette, LSU
                            2. *Dalvin Cook, Florida State
                            3. *Alvin Kamara, Tennessee
                            4. *Christian McCaffrey, Stanford
                            5. *D'Onta Foreman, Texas
                            6. *Wayne Gallman, Clemson
                            7. *Joe Mixon, Oklahoma
                            8. *Samaje Perine, Oklahoma
                            9. Kareem Hunt, Toledo
                            10. Matthew Dayes, NC State

                            A very deep running back class gets only deeper with the emergence of Kamara. His combination of quickness and power really stands out on tape. Round 1 is not out of the question for him.

                            Wide receivers

                            1. *Mike Williams, Clemson
                            2. Corey Davis, Western Michigan
                            3. *John Ross, Washington
                            4. Cooper Kupp, Eastern Washington
                            5. *ArDarius Stewart, Alabama
                            6. Zay Jones, East Carolina
                            7. *JuJu Smith-Schuster, USC
                            8. *Curtis Samuel, Ohio State
                            9. *Isaiah Ford, Virginia Tech
                            10. *Malachi Dupree, LSU

                            Kupp's reliable hands and Jones' raw speed stood out during Senior Bowl practices and helped boost the stock of both small-school prospects. Kupp and Jones have a shot to be second-round picks.

                            Tight ends

                            1. O.J. Howard, Alabama
                            2. *David Njoku, Miami (Fla.)
                            3. Jake Butt, Michigan
                            4. Jordan Leggett, Clemson
                            5. Gerald Everett, South Alabama
                            6. Evan Engram, Mississippi
                            7. *Bucky Hodges, Virginia Tech
                            8. Cole Hikutini, Louisville
                            9. *Adam Shaheen, Ashland
                            10. Jeremy Sprinkle, Arkansas

                            We didn't evaluate Njoku until after the season, but once we did, he shot up our rankings -- and his grade is not too far behind Howard's. Njoku averaged 16.2 yards per reception in 2016. This is a good year to need a tight end. Engram flashed at the Senior Bowl as an H-back type.

                            Offensive tackles

                            1. *Ryan Ramczyk, Wisconsin
                            2. *Cam Robinson, Alabama
                            3. *Garett Bolles, Utah
                            4. *Roderick Johnson, Florida State
                            5. Zach Banner, USC
                            6. Adam Bisnowaty, Pittsburgh
                            7. Jon Heck, North Carolina
                            8. Chad Wheeler, USC
                            9. Julien Davenport, Bucknell
                            10. Conor McDermott, UCLA

                            In my second mock draft, I didn't have an offensive tackle coming off the board until No. 20 overall. The top-end talent in the class falls off pretty quickly, with Ramczyk the only one with a first-round grade.

                            Offensive guards

                            1. Forrest Lamp, Western Kentucky
                            2. Antonio Garcia, Troy
                            3. Dion Dawkins, Temple
                            4. Dan Feeney, Indiana
                            5. Dorian Johnson, Pittsburgh
                            6. Caleb Peterson, North Carolina
                            7. Taylor Moton, Western Michigan
                            8. *Damien Mama, USC
                            9. Greg Pyke, Georgia
                            10. *David Sharpe, Florida

                            Garcia was one of our biggest draft risers from Senior Bowl week, as he flashed a nasty disposition in the run game. We have him penciled in as a guard right now, but that could change depending on how he fares in the agility drills at the combine.

                            Centers

                            1. Pat Elflein, Ohio State
                            2. Ethan Pocic, LSU
                            3. Cameron Tom, Southern Mississippi
                            4. Tyler Orlosky, West Virginia
                            5. Jon Toth, Kentucky
                            6. Jay Guillermo, Clemson
                            7. Chase Roullier, Wyoming
                            8. Kyle Fuller, Baylor
                            9. Lucas Crowley, North Carolina

                            Pocic and Elflein will both enter the NFL with a ton of starting experience, and you can tell from watching their tape that they've played a ton of football.

                            Note: There are only nine centers ranked above because those are the only players at the position with draftable grades.

                            Defensive ends

                            1. *Myles Garrett, Texas A&M
                            2. *Solomon Thomas, Stanford
                            3. Taco Charlton, Michigan
                            4. *Derek Barnett, Tennessee
                            5. *Charles Harris, Missouri
                            6. DeMarcus Walker, Florida State
                            7. *Carl Lawson, Auburn
                            8. Dawaune Smoot, Illinois
                            9. Deatrich Wise Jr., Arkansas
                            10. Keionta Davis, Chattanooga

                            Thomas parlayed a breakout junior campaign (15.0 tackles for loss, 8.0 sacks and seven QB hurries) into possibly being a top-15 pick. Three of my top-11 players overall are defensive ends.

                            Defensive tackles

                            1. Jonathan Allen, Alabama
                            2. *Malik McDowell, Michigan State
                            3. *Caleb Brantley, Florida
                            4. *Elijah Qualls, Washington
                            5. Jaleel Johnson, Iowa
                            6. Dalvin Tomlinson, Alabama
                            7. Carlos Watkins, Clemson
                            8. Chris Wormley, Michigan
                            9. *Charles Walker, Oklahoma
                            10. Eddie Vanderdoes, UCLA

                            Johnson had a dominant showing at the Senior Bowl. He flies off the ball and is very powerful at the point of attack. Round 2 is a possibility, and I'd be surprised if he is still on the board after the third round.

                            Inside linebackers

                            1. Reuben Foster, Alabama
                            2. *Raekwon McMillan, Ohio State
                            3. *Anthony Walker Jr., Northwestern
                            4. *Zach Cunningham, Vanderbilt
                            5. Kendell Beckwith, LSU
                            6. Duke Riley, LSU
                            7. *Alex Anzalone, Florida
                            8. Keith Kelsey, Louisville
                            9. Ben Boulware, Clemson
                            10. Riley Bullough, Michigan State

                            Riley is one of the biggest risers on this list, thanks in large part to his performance at the Senior Bowl. He made a ton of plays in coverage and versus the run in Mobile. He's a player I'd love to have on my team.

                            Outside linebackers

                            1. Takkarist McKinley, UCLA
                            2. Jarrad Davis, Florida
                            3. Tim Williams, Alabama
                            4. Ryan Anderson, Alabama
                            5. *T.J. Watt, Wisconsin
                            6. Haason Reddick, Temple
                            7. Devonte Fields, Louisville
                            8. Tyus Bowser, Houston
                            9. Josh Carraway, TCU
                            10. Ejuan Price, Pittsburgh

                            I snuck Reddick into the final slot of my second mock draft. He proved in Mobile that he has the ability to thrive as a space linebacker. Combine that with the pass-rushing ability we saw from him in college, and Reddick has an intriguing skill set.

                            Cornerbacks

                            1. *Marshon Lattimore, Ohio State
                            2. *Teez Tabor, Florida
                            3. *Sidney Jones, Washington
                            4. Tre'Davious White, LSU
                            5. *Quincy Wilson, Florida
                            6. Jourdan Lewis, Michigan
                            7. *Marlon Humphrey, Alabama
                            8. *Adoree' Jackson, USC
                            9. *Gareon Conley, Ohio State
                            10. Cameron Sutton, Tennessee

                            This is an extremely deep cornerback class, with each of the 10 prospects above carrying at least a second-round grade. Lattimore has the best cover skills of the group and projects as a potential top-10 pick.

                            Safeties

                            1. *Jamal Adams, LSU
                            2. *Malik Hooker, Ohio State
                            3. *Jabrill Peppers, Michigan
                            4. *Budda Baker, Washington
                            5. Obi Melifonwu, Connecticut
                            6. *Marcus Williams, Utah
                            7. Marcus Maye, Florida
                            8. *Josh Jones, NC State
                            9. Justin Evans, Texas A&M
                            10. John Johnson, Boston College

                            Melifonwu moved really well for a player his size (6-foot-4, 219 pounds) at the Senior Bowl. He's a guy to watch at the combine. Adams is one of the most complete players in this class and could be the highest safety selected since Eric Berry went No. 5 overall in 2010.
                            In 2016 Brock Osweiler was rated last (32nd) among all QBs (>400 attempts) by ProFootballFocus and ranked 33rd/34 QBs (>200 attempts) by Football Outsiders.

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                            • #15
                              Kiper's combine recap: 15 prospects who helped NFL draft stock

                              The 2017 NFL combine is over and done with, and before we move on to pro days -- which begin this week -- let's look back at prospects who caught my eye at the combine and helped their draft stock.

                              You won't find pass-rusher Myles Garrett or wide receiver John Ross here, even though both lit up the combine. That's because what we saw only cemented their status in my rankings. Garrett has been my No. 1 prospect since the beginning of the season, and he's staying right where he has been after he posted ridiculous numbers. He ran a 4.64 40-yard dash and had a 41-inch vertical and 10-foot-8 broad jump, all at 6-foot-4, 272 pounds. The Browns have to take him with the No. 1 pick. Ross, meanwhile, ran a combine-record 4.22 40-yard dash, but we already knew speed was his best asset. He's a top-three receiver and potential first-round pick.

                              Two things to keep in mind about my risers from the combine:
                              • We don't have access to the medical reports, so I'm basing these on drills and on-field workouts.
                              • Pro days are still an important part of the process, which is why you won't find any draft "fallers" -- yet. Florida cornerback Teez Tabor ran a 4.62 40, which is concerning. But maybe he had a bad workout, and maybe he'll run faster at his pro day. His tape shows first-round talent, so I'm not dropping him.
                              Here are 15 prospects who helped their stock at the combine, starting with a quarterback who had a great workout.
                              Patrick Mahomes II, QB, Texas Tech


                              Mahomes, who measured in at 6-foot-2, 225 pounds, put on an impressive display in the on-field workouts, showing that he can make all of the throws. He also put up the best 20-yard shuttle (4.08 seconds) time and third-best three-cone drill (6.88) time and had a solid 40-yard dash (4.8). The former Red Raider signal-caller is more of a thrower than a pitcher who can pick his spots at this point, but his arm talent is undeniable. He's extremely raw -- his footwork and mechanics on tape are maddeningly inconsistent -- and the air raid system in which he played will likely cause some hesitation among teams. From all I've heard, however, Mahomes is a sponge who wants to learn and develop, and he'll work hard to learn the playbook when he's drafted. I think Mahomes is entrenched as the fourth quarterback in this draft -- behind Mitch Trubisky, Deshaun Watson and DeShone Kizer -- and he's in the mix to be picked in the second or third round.

                              T.J. Logan, RB, North Carolina


                              Logan ran a 4.37 40-yard dash, which was tops among a stellar running back class, and he put up 17 reps of 225 pounds on the bench press test, showing off good strength. I haven't ranked him among my top 10 backs in this class, but that might change soon. Sharing carries with Elijah Hood in 2016, Logan (5-9, 196) rushed for 650 yards and seven touchdowns and averaged 5.4 yards per carry. He also added 29 catches and three receiving touchdowns. Logan's 40 time is tough to ignore -- he's a potential big-play threat who could fill a role as a third-down back in the NFL. I thought he was a fifth- or sixth-round pick before this weekend, and now I think he's in play for the latter part of Day 2 or early on Day 3.

                              Joe Williams, RB, Utah


                              The former Ute is another guy who hasn't cracked my ranking of the top 10 backs in this class -- it's a really strong group. Williams (5-11, 210) was one of the most productive players in the country after returning from a monthlong retirement, finishing the season with 1,407 rushing yards and 10 touchdowns while averaging 6.7 yards per carry. There were some questions about Williams' athleticism, but those should be gone now; he posted the second-best 40-yard dash (4.41) and 20-yard shuttle (4.19) among running backs, and his 35-inch vertical was in the top half of backs in attendance. I have Williams rated as a Day 3 guy, but he could be taken in the third round.

                              Zay Jones, WR, East Carolina


                              Jones, my seventh-ranked wideout, was one of the most impressive prospects at the combine, continuing his rise after a huge senior season in which he had 158 catches for 1,746 yards and eight touchdowns. Jones ran a 4.45 40 and had a 36.5-inch vertical at 6-2, 201 pounds, putting him among the top wideouts in each category. He also had a 11-foot-1 broad jump and a 4.01-second 20-yard shuttle, which were each third-best among receivers. Jones was one of the top players at last month's Senior Bowl, too, showing off his ability as a savvy route runner. He can make contested catches look easy, high-pointing the ball over corners. Jones is a potential late first- or early second-round pick.

                              Carlos Henderson, WR, Louisiana Tech


                              Henderson isn't big -- 5-11, 199 -- but he helped his stock at the combine, showing stellar explosion with a 4.46 40 and 36-inch vertical. He isn't a true No. 1 outside receiver, but he can help a team from the slot or outside and in the return game. Playing mostly outside for the Bulldogs in 2016, Henderson, my No. 9 receiver, had a breakout season with 82 catches for 1,535 yards and 19 touchdowns, which was tied for most in FBS. He also returned two kickoffs for touchdowns. Henderson's versatility will help him, and his workout numbers wowed scouts, but he's still a boom-or-bust guy -- he had only one season of high-end play. Henderson is a solid Day 2 pick.

                              Evan Engram, TE, Ole Miss


                              In a great group of tight ends, Engram is in the first-round discussion. He showed off his outstanding athleticism this weekend, posting the best 40 time (4.42) among tight ends and the fourth-best vertical (36 inches). At 6-3, 234, Engram has long arms (33.5 inches) and great hands. He had 65 catches for 925 yards and eight touchdowns in 2016, and he was a four-year player for the Rebels. He's a natural pass-catcher who could line up in the slot in the NFL, though he must improve his inline blocking. Engram is my No. 3 tight end. Evan Engram had a breakout season in 2016 with 65 catches and eight touchdowns.

                              Bucky Hodges, TE, Virginia Tech


                              At 6-6, 257, Hodges is one of the most physically gifted players in this draft. His 39-inch vertical and 11-foot-2 broad jump were the best among tight ends, and he ran a 4.57 40, which is outstanding for a guy his size. Hodges' tape, however, doesn't always match up with his athletic prowess -- he's not an effective blocker, and he's much more comfortable on his feet. He has a high ceiling as a pass-catching tight end, though, and a team could fall in love with his potential. Hodges, a former high school quarterback, had 133 catches and 20 touchdowns in his three-year career for the Hokies. He's my No. 4 tight end and in the second- or third-round range.

                              Adam Shaheen, TE, Ashland


                              A 32.5-inch vertical was a great number for the massive Shaheen, who's 6-6, 278. He also put up 24 reps of 225 pounds on the bench, which was tied for best among tight ends. And he did that with long arms (33.5 inches). Shaheen is a former basketball player who lit up the GLIAC in Division II with 127 catches for 1,670 yards and 26 touchdowns over the past two seasons. There will be questions about his competition level because he dominated against smaller, less athletic defenders, but he could be a Day 2 pick in April. Shaheen is my No. 9 tight end.

                              Aviante Collins, OT, TCU


                              The 6-4, 295-pound Collins turned heads with a 4.81 40-yard dash, which was by far the best among offensive linemen. He comes from a family of sprinters -- his mom was a track star at Houston, and his dad and brother were sprinters at TCU. Collins also put up 34 reps on bench, second best among the O-line group. His tape shows a developmental prospect who's likely to be taken on Day 3; and he didn't consistently perform to the level of his testing. He is probably going to have to play guard in the NFL after spending time at tackle and guard for the Horned Frogs. Collins needs time to work on his technique.

                              Taylor Moton, OT, Western Michigan


                              Moton, a four-year starter for the Broncos, has continued to move up my rankings, coming in as the No. 6 tackle before the combine. He went back and forth between right guard and right tackle the past four years, but he excelled at tackle in 2016. The tape shows Moton (6-5, 319) has nice feet in pass protection and sustains his blocks well. His 30.5-inch vertical was third best among offensive linemen at the combine, and his 4.58 20-yard shuttle was fourth best. Moton could move up in my next batch of rankings; I think he's a second-round pick who can be a long-term starter in the right situation.

                              Trey Hendrickson, DE, Florida Atlantic


                              I really liked Hendrickson's effort and energy on tape -- he had 23 sacks over the past two seasons -- and he has had a good postseason. He impressed at the East-West Shrine game practices and was named most outstanding defensive player during the game. His 4.20 20-yard shuttle at the combine was second best among defensive linemen, and he looked fluid in workouts. At 6-4, 266, Hendrickson's a natural pass-rusher who could be taken in the third or fourth round. The only negative is his arm length -- 32 inches. You'd like to see longer arms on a pass-rusher off the edge. That could scare off some teams.

                              Jordan Willis, DE, Kansas State


                              I've been a big fan of Willis for a while, and he didn't disappoint over the weekend. His 4.53 40-yard dash and 39-inch vertical were second among a really good class of defensive linemen. Teams wanted to see that he was as athletic as some of the other top-end pass-rushers, and Willis showed his worth. He could play on his feet or with his hand in the dirt in the NFL. Willis had 21 sacks for the Wildcats the past two seasons and was the Big 12 Defensive Player of the Year in 2016. He also holds up well against the run, which is going to be important at the next level. He's my No. 8 defensive end right now and solidly in the second-round mix. He's a top-50 talent. Jordan Willis was one of the best defenders in the Big 12 over the past two seasons. Photo by Joe

                              Marshon Lattimore, CB, Ohio State


                              My No. 1 cornerback for most of the season, Lattimore put up some stellar numbers on Monday, separating himself from the pack. He ran a 4.36 40-yard dash and had a 38.5-inch vertical and 11-foot broad jump. All three were in the top 10 among defensive backs. And that's at 6-0, 193. Lattimore is a shutdown corner who was a one-year starter for the Buckeyes. He had four interceptions in 2016. The one red flag? Lattimore pulled up with a hamstring injury during workouts, according to ESPN NFL Insider Adam Schefter, though the Buckeye said it was a hip flexor injury. Lattimore struggled with a hamstring injury during his first two years in Columbus, and his medical reports will be under close inspection. I still think he's a top-10 pick -- he's that good.

                              Chidobe Awuzie, CB, Colorado


                              Awuzie is another defensive back who had an 11-foot broad jump and showed off impressive athleticism. He ran a 4.43 40-yard dash at 6-0, 202. Awuzie could be a good third corner for an NFL team, and he'll help out on special teams. He's tough and physical -- he had eight sacks to go with his three interceptions over the past two seasons. He doesn't crack my list of the top 10 corners -- it's a really talented group -- but he could be picked at the end of Day 2.

                              Obi Melifonwu, S, Connecticut


                              I wrote about Melifonwu in October, when he had an interception and made several plays in UConn's loss to South Florida. At the time I rated him as a fourth-round pick who could move up after the season. Well, he might have been the biggest athletic freak at the combine, running a 4.40 40-yard dash and posting a ridiculous 44-inch vertical and 11-foot-9 broad jump. Both leaps were tops of any prospect at the combine. And that's at 6-4, 224. He's one of the best athletes of the past decade. On the field, Melifonwu had four interceptions and was the Huskies' leading tackler in 2016. He can come up in run support and play the deep middle of the field. He was my No. 6 safety in my last rankings, but he's moving up -- he's a borderline first-round pick.
                              In 2016 Brock Osweiler was rated last (32nd) among all QBs (>400 attempts) by ProFootballFocus and ranked 33rd/34 QBs (>200 attempts) by Football Outsiders.

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