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Mel Kiper and Todd McShay on 2017 NFL Draft

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  • #16
    McShay's Top 32: Big shake-up after the NFL combine
    Todd McShay/ESPN Senior Writer
    After four days of workouts at the NFL combine, let's take a look at which players have moved up and down our top 32, drawing on the same scouting reports as before and making changes where necessary.

    We'll continue to update our board as we get closer to the 2017 NFL draft and complete our evaluations. Although it's a given that some players will move into the rankings and others will drop out, this provides a good snapshot of which players currently have the most NFL potential, based on our evaluations.
    To see our top 10 players at each position, check out this article.

    1. Myles Garrett, DE, Texas A&M*
    Garrett is the best pure pass-rusher -- and one of the best overall athletes -- in the 2017 draft. You don't see many 272-pound men who run a 4.64 40 or jump 41 inches in the vertical. He played through an ankle injury for much of this past season and still finished tied for sixth in the SEC with 15.0 tackles for loss (including 8.5 sacks). He has a lethal combination of first-step quickness, bend, power and hand-to-hand combat skills. Garrett can fit into any scheme. He's a transcendent-type player.
    2. Jonathan Allen, DT, Alabama
    Allen is one of the most complete players in this class. He's absolutely dominant against the run (8.5 tackles for loss in his final five games) and has the ability to get after the passer from the interior (15 quarterback hurries and 10.5 sacks). Allen's excellent combination of quickness and power makes him one of the best interior pass-rushers we've studied in this draft class. He constantly pushes the pocket and brings tremendous experience to the table, with 56 games played.
    3. Jamal Adams, S, LSU*
    Adams has an excellent blend of size, length and athleticism, and it shows up on tape. He's a difference-maker as an in-the-box defender, racking up 7.0 tackles for loss in his last seven games. Adams didn't put on the best performance at the combine -- his 4.56 40 is slightly worse than average for safeties and his 31-inch vertical is well below average. We'll see what he does at LSU's pro day, but Adams is still a top player in this class.
    4. Solomon Thomas, DE, Stanford*
    Measuring 6-foot-2⅝ and 273 pounds, Thomas checks pretty much every box. His combination of quickness and power pops off the screen and helped make him one of the biggest draft risers this season. He has elite strength (30 reps on the bench) and he's stout against the run (15.0 tackles for loss, 8.0 sacks and seven quarterback hurries).
    5. Malik Hooker, S, Ohio State*
    Hooker didn't work out at the combine after having surgery on his labrum and for a hernia, and it's unclear whether he'll be able to work out for teams at all prior to the draft. That shouldn't affect his draft stock too much. Only two players in college football had more interceptions in 2016 than Hooker's seven picks. In his first season as a starter, Hooker showed great instincts and range in coverage.
    6. Marshon Lattimore, CB, Ohio State*
    A first-year starter, Lattimore has truly elite cover skills, and he tested off the charts in Indianapolis -- 4.36 40, 38-inch vertical, 11-foot broad jump. But he tweaked his hamstring while working out, according to ESPN's Adam Schefter. This bears watching considering Lattimore's history with hamstring injuries. At 6-foot, 192 pounds, Lattimore has good length and fluid movement skills. He took full advantage of his spike in playing time, with four interceptions and nine pass breakups this season.
    7. Leonard Fournette, RB, LSU*
    Fournette, who had a nagging ankle injury all season, weighed in at 240 pounds at the combine. He carries the weight well -- and it didn't stop him from running a 4.51 40 -- but it's still a big number for a running back. When fully healthy, Fournette was as good as you'll ever see at the college level in terms of straight-line explosiveness. His angry running style is something at which to marvel, and it will translate well to the next level.
    8. O.J. Howard, TE, Alabama
    Howard measured nearly 6-foot-6 and 251 pounds, and he ran a 4.51-second 40. That's elite speed for the position. He has the size and arm length (33 inches) to play as an in-line TE, and the speed to be a major matchup problem down the field for opposing defenses. Howard has shown the ability to shine on the biggest stages (314 receiving yards and three touchdowns versus Clemson in the past two CFP title games), and he should thrive in a more pass-heavy NFL system.
    9. Reuben Foster, ILB, Alabama
    Foster was sent home early from the combine after a dustup with a hospital employee. On the field, he's one of the better inside linebacker prospects in recent memory. He flies to the ball, and when he gets there, he shows explosive tackling ability. Foster had 11.5 tackles for loss in his final 10 games of 2016. For a player his size (240 pounds), Foster shows a good combination of agility and speed.
    10. Dalvin Cook, RB, Florida State*
    Cook, who ranked second in the FBS with 2,253 total yards this season, truly can do it all. He makes defenders miss with subtle changes in direction, and he doesn't need much of a crease to rattle off a big play. At 5-foot-10, 210 pounds and with 4.49 speed, Cook is a big play waiting to happen (18 touches of 25 yards or more in 2016, tied for first among all Power 5 running backs). He's also a very physical blocker in pass protection.
    11. Teez Tabor, CB, Florida*
    Tabor is really smooth and quick, but what makes him really good is how effective he is at using his hands. That's vital in the NFL when you're working against receivers who know how to get off press coverage. One red flag? Tabor ran a 4.62 40 at the combine. That's not a good number for a cornerback. His elite instincts make up a little bit for the lack of top-end speed, but I'll be interested to see what he runs at Florida's pro day.
    12. Corey Davis, WR, Western Michigan
    Davis' speed really stands out on tape. He looks like a guy who will run in the 4.4s at his pro day, assuming he's healthy enough to participate after having ankle surgery. If that's the case, he has a chance to be a top-10 pick because of his size (6-foot-2, 205 pounds) and college production. Davis had 332 catches, 5,285 yards and 52 touchdowns at Western Michigan. Yes, he was playing mostly against MAC competition, but he dominated like you'd expect from an elite talent.
    13. Sidney Jones, CB, Washington
    At 6-foot and 186 pounds, Jones is long and a smooth mover, but he needs to get stronger. He has shown the ability to excel in both man and zone coverage. Jones -- who had 21 pass breakups and nine interceptions in three seasons -- is physical for a smaller-framed guy, and he has great speed (4.47 40).
    14. David Njoku, TE, Miami (Fla.)*
    Njoku's measurables are a little freakish -- 6-foot-4 and 246 pounds with 35-inch arms. Those are good left tackle arms, which will obviously help him as a blocker and in contested-catch situations. He jumped out of the gym at the combine too, with a 37.5-inch vertical and an 11-foot-1 broad jump. A good college player who has the potential to develop into a better pro, Njoku averaged 16.2 yards per reception in 2016.
    15. Mike Williams, WR, Clemson*
    Williams opted against running the 40-yard dash at the combine. That's the one looming question: What's his true top-end speed? We'll find out at Clemson's pro day on March 16. Here's the reality: At just over 6-foot-3 and 218 pounds, if Williams runs 4.55 or better, he's totally fine. It's important not to forget what Williams showed on the field this season. He's an elite WR when the ball is in the air, and he physically dominated against Alabama in the CFP National Championship.
    16. John Ross, WR, Washington
    You might have heard: Ross broke the modern combine record by running a 4.22 40-yard dash. But one thing I want to make really clear: He's not a combine creation; this is a really good football player who looks like a first-rounder on tape. Ross has savvy route-running ability, reliable hands and, yes, blazing speed on the field. He's also a good returner, having scored four return touchdowns in his three seasons at Washington. Ross has a good chance to be a top-15 pick.
    17. Taco Charlton, DE, Michigan
    Charlton finished the season on a tear, compiling 10 sacks in his final 10 games. He has always had the raw ability, but this past season he showed more consistency and refined technique. Charlton, who fits best as a 4-3 DE, is one of the more underrated players in this group.
    18. Garett Bolles, OT, Utah*
    A junior-college transfer, Bolles made 12 starts at left tackle in his lone season at Utah. He has room to add bulk and strength to his 6-foot-5, 297-pound frame, but Bolles has an excellent combination of length, flexibility and athleticism to develop into a starting left tackle.
    19. Forrest Lamp, G, Western Kentucky
    Lamp's below-average arm length (32 inches) confirmed that he's a guard in the NFL. Lamp started 51 total games for Western Kentucky, most of which were at left tackle. He's a smooth mover and an excellent athlete, and his tape against Alabama (particularly Tim Williams) was awesome.
    20. Malik McDowell, DT, Michigan State*
    McDowell is arguably the most physically gifted interior pass-rusher in this class. He didn't play with the same passion and toughness this past season, which is a red flag. But McDowell has elite athleticism and can play multiple positions along the D-line at the next level. He could be a steal in the mid-to-late first round if he lands with the right coaching staff to develop him and keep him motivated.
    21. Ryan Ramczyk, OT, Wisconsin*
    Ramczyk has the best tape of any offensive lineman in this class. But he also has just one year of major college experience after transferring to Wisconsin from UW-Stevens Points (Division III) and had hip surgery in January that bears monitoring. With an ideal frame (6-foot-6, 310 pounds), Ramczyk proved to be consistent as a run-blocker and in pass protection in 2016.
    22. Derek Barnett, DE, Tennessee*
    Barnett isn't an elite athlete, but he plays with good discipline, a consistent motor and impressive physicality. He also had ridiculous production the past two seasons (23.0 sacks and 31.5 tackles for loss). At 259 pounds, he's not a guy who's going to overwhelm offensive tackles by converting speed to power. The more I watch him, the more I think he fits best at 3-4 OLB.
    23. Tre'Davious White, CB, LSU
    White is one of the most experienced players in this class, having started 47 games in his LSU career. His elite football instincts and good overall feel for route combinations were on full display at the Senior Bowl practices. White doesn't have great ball production (only six career interceptions), but he has good speed (4.47 40) and brings added value as a punt returner.
    24. Takkarist McKinley, OLB, UCLA
    At 6-foot-2 and 250 pounds, McKinley plays harder than any pass-rusher I've watched in years. He has really long arms (34 inches) and terrific speed (4.59 40), but he hasn't quite figured out how to use his hands. It might take McKinley a little bit to refine his technique, but he's not a guy I'd bet against.
    25. Haason Reddick, ILB, Temple
    Reddick played defensive end in college, but he'll be an off-the-ball linebacker in the pros, similar to the transition Tedy Bruschi made coming out of Arizona. He ran a 4.52 40 at 6-foot-1 and 237 pounds. That's outstanding. And his 11-foot-1 broad jump marked just the third time since 2006 that a linebacker eclipsed the 11-foot mark in Indy. Over the span of about six weeks, Reddick has gone from a virtual unknown to having a legitimate chance to be a first-round pick.
    26. Alvin Kamara, RB, Tennessee*
    Kamara is just so explosive, posting the best vertical jump (39.5 inches) and broad jump (10 feet, 11 inches) among all the running backs at the combine. He has prototypical size at 5-foot-10 and 214 pounds and exceptional vision/lateral quickness and the power to break a lot of tackles. Kamara has the skill set of a first-rounder, but the on-field sample size with him isn't very large (he averaged just 8.75 carries per game in his final two seasons).
    27. Christian McCaffrey, RB, Stanford*
    McCaffrey took full advantage of his opportunity at the combine, running a 4.48 40 and the second-fastest three-cone for a RB since 2006 (6.57). I was pleasantly surprised by McCaffrey's straight-line speed, but the short-area quickness measured by the three-cone definitely shows up on tape. If you draft McCaffrey, you're getting a really good running back and wide receiver. You can't say that about many guys.
    28. Budda Baker, S, Washington*
    At 5-foot-9⅝ and 195 pounds, Baker lacks ideal size, but when you watch the film, he's all over the field. A three-year starter, Baker was the only Pac-12 defensive back to finish this season with double-digit tackles for loss. He also had two interceptions and six pass breakups. He has a lot of Tyrann Mathieu-like qualities
    29. Quincy Wilson, CB, Florida*
    The more I watch Wilson, the more impressed I get. He's not quite as smooth and athletic as Tabor (No. 11 on this list), but he has the better top-end speed (4.54 vs. 4.62). At 6-foot-1, Wilson has a good length, and he's experienced, with 39 games played, including 24 starts.
    30. Mitch Trubisky, QB, North Carolina*
    There's a lot to like about Trubisky's tape. He flashes the ability to go through progressions, and he's the most accurate quarterback in this class. I love Trubisky's pocket presence, but have concerns about some of the critical errors he made, including two bad interceptions versus Stanford. Trubisky's 13 career starts also makes him a tough evaluation; the history of quarterbacks leaving school early without a ton of game reps isn't great (just look at Mark Sanchez). But with the lack of top-end talent in this draft class and the number of teams drafting in the top 10 that need new blood at the position, Trubisky could be a high pick come April.
    31. Jourdan Lewis, CB, Michigan
    Lewis is undersized at 5-10 and 188 pounds and he's not the fastest guy (4.54), but man, his tape is fun. He shows great physicality for a player his size, and he shadows as well as any cornerback I've seen in the past few years. Lewis has unbelievable instincts, along with the ball skills you look for (31 pass breakups and four INTs the past two seasons). He's plug-and-play nickel/slot corner from day one who can eventually transition to playing on the outside as he gets more experience.
    32. Marcus Maye, S, Florida*
    Maye is not as physical against the run as former teammate and 2016 first-rounder Keanu Neal, but he's better in coverage than Neal was coming out. He can excel in either man or zone coverage and he shouldered a lot of responsibilities in Florida's defense, making pre-snap checks and getting teammates lined up.
    I don't think there's a love affair going on between the front office and Bill O'Brien, good chance of a mutual separation after 2017. -- Lance Zierlein and Jayson Braddock

    Comment


    • #17
      Kiper's 2017 Big Board: A post-combine shake-up

      The NFL combine is over, and we're 43 days from the 2017 draft, which means it's time for an update to my Big Board.

      The changes in this edition include a shake-up among the top wide receivers, the re-entry of a quarterback who had been included during the season, and the rise -- more than 10 spots -- of an SEC pass-catcher.

      One asterisk denotes a junior, and two asterisks denote a redshirt sophomore for the 2016 season.

      1. *Myles Garrett, DE, Texas A&M

      Previous rank: 1

      Garrett ran a ridiculous 4.64 40-yard dash and had a 41-inch vertical jump and 10-foot-8 broad jump, all at 6-foot-4, 272 pounds, at the combine. He cemented his stock as my No. 1 prospect, he'll stay at No. 1 to the Browns in Mock Draft 3.0. Garrett had a frustrating 2016 season, hampered by a high ankle sprain he suffered in late September, and his 8.5 sacks were down from his freshman total of 11.5 and sophomore total of 12.5. When he's on, he's a brilliant, natural pass-rusher.


      2. Jonathan Allen, DE, Alabama

      Previous rank: 2

      Allen was one of the top two or three defenders in the country the past two seasons. After having 12 sacks in 2015, he had 10.5 more in 2016, including one in Alabama's national title game loss. I wrote in October about Allen's performance against Texas A&M, in which he had a signature sack and returned a fumble for a touchdown. Defensive end, defensive tackle -- at 6-3, 286 pounds, Allen can play anywhere on the line, and in a 4-3 or 3-4 defense. Plus, coach Nick Saban loves him.

      3. **Solomon Thomas, DE, Stanford

      Previous rank: 5

      A third-year sophomore, Thomas has steadily risen over the past year and now he's in the mix to be a top-five pick. He put up solid numbers at the combine and showed off the explosion that I saw on tape. Thomas plays like a veteran, causing disruptions in both the running and passing games. He had eight sacks in 2016 while playing end, but at 6-3, 273 pounds, he could move inside and play tackle. The versatility is what stands out. And he has some speed -- he ran a 4.69 40, and check out this fumble return.

      4. **Marshon Lattimore, CB, Ohio State

      Previous rank: 7

      At the combine, Lattimore ran a 4.36 40 and had a 38.5-inch vertical and 11-foot broad jump, all three ranking in the top 10 among defensive backs. He's an athletic phenom who doesn't have a ton of experience. Lattimore (6-0, 193) was a first-year starter in 2016 who struggled with a hamstring injury during his first two years in Columbus (and it did tighten up on him at the combine). He was fantastic, standing out in a group of talented defenders and posting four interceptions, including a pick-six. He tackles well and locked down receivers he matched up against. The 2017 cornerback class could be special, and Lattimore is at the top.

      5. Reuben Foster, ILB, Alabama

      Previous rank: 3

      I'm not dropping Foster too much after his bizarre ejection from the combine, and I don't see him dropping past the top 10 in the draft. He is a big-time inside linebacker who might have been Alabama's best linebacker in 2015. Yes, better than Reggie Ragland, who went in the second round to the Bills in the 2016 draft. Foster (6-0, 229) has more range, runs sideline to sideline and is a more complete player. He's a terrific blitzer too, and recorded five sacks in 2016. I expect him to follow in the footsteps of inside linebackers from Alabama who have gone in the first round, such as Rolando McClain, Dont'a Hightower and C.J. Mosley.

      6. *Jamal Adams, S, LSU

      Previous rank: 4

      Adams put up solid safety numbers at the combine, running a 4.56 40 with a vertical jump of 31.5 inches at 6-0, 214. He was a huge part of LSU's defensive success the past few seasons, even if it doesn't show on the stat sheet; he had one interception, one sack and one forced fumble this past season. He has great bloodlines -- his dad, George Adams, was the No. 19 overall pick in the 1985 NFL draft. He is built for today's NFL as a versatile safety who can play in the box effectively, make tackles against the run and move to the edges and track slot receivers.

      7. *Leonard Fournette, RB, LSU

      Previous rank: 6

      A 4.51 40 is a great time for a 240-pound back, but Fournette's 28.5-inch vertical turned some heads, and not in a good way. I still see plenty of explosion when I watch his games. He struggled with a gimpy ankle in 2016 and played in only seven games. Fournette has an incredible combination of speed and power that can make him look like a varsity player hanging with the JV. Mileage was a concern heading into last season, but that's not an issue now. He had a whopping 300 carries in 2015 -- for 1,953 yards and 22 touchdowns -- and only 129 in 2016.

      8. *Taco Charlton, DE, Michigan

      Previous rank: 11

      Charlton's measurements -- 6-6, 277 with 34 arms -- really stood out at the combine, and he tested well. He plays with good leverage for his height, has active hands and takes ideal angles when rushing the passer. Charlton can play on his feet, which means he could fit in a 4-3 or 3-4 scheme. He was the best defensive player on the field in Michigan's loss to Ohio State in late November, with 2.5 sacks and nine total tackles, showing off a full arsenal of pass-rushing moves. He finished the season with 9.5 sacks despite missing two games with an ankle injury.

      9. *Dalvin Cook, RB, Florida State

      Previous rank: 8

      Cook (5-10, 210) is a home run hitter who can turn small creases into massive gains. He finished the 2016 season with 100-yard rushing performances in nine of his last 10 games, including 145 rushing yards and 62 receiving yards in the Orange Bowl win over Michigan. He averaged 6.1 yards per carry -- after averaging 7.4 in 2015 -- and had 33 receptions for 488 yards. With good hands and the ability to find and pick up blitzes, he's versatile. He had a whopping 40 total touchdowns in the past two seasons.

      10. O.J. Howard, TE, Alabama

      Previous rank: 21

      Howard moves up a few more spots here after standing out at Senior Bowl practices and having a great combine (he ran a 4.51 40 at 6-6, 251, among many other impressive measurements). He wasn't a prolific pass-catcher at Alabama, including only 37 catches last season, but he has all the tools scouts look for in an NFL tight end. He can stretch the deep middle of the field and become a more dynamic weapon. He could be a playmaker in the NFL. Three of his seven career touchdowns came in national title games.

      11. Takkarist McKinley, DE, UCLA

      Previous rank: 12

      Pac-12 offensive tackles had nightmares last season about McKinley, who is a dominant speed rusher. At 6-2, 250, he's not huge, but his explosion off the line is suited for today's NFL. He ran the third-fastest 40 among defensive linemen (4.59). A former junior college player, McKinley really came on as a senior, recording 10 sacks and three forced fumbles. McKinley impressed me with his motor too, even while dealing with multiple injuries.

      12. **Malik Hooker, S, Ohio State

      Previous rank: 14

      Hooker didn't take part in drills at the combine after having surgery in January to repair a torn labrum in his left hip and repair sports hernias, but measuring in at 6-1, 206 will help him. Like his teammate Lattimore, Hooker was another third-year sophomore and first-year starter in 2016. He has incredible range and was the best center-field-type safety I saw last season. He had seven interceptions and returned three of them for touchdowns. He was all over the field for the Buckeyes.

      13. Haason Reddick, OLB, Temple

      Previous rank: NR

      Reddick just keeps rising -- his stock has moved up as much as anybody in this class. I pegged him at No. 30 to the Steelers in Mock Draft 2.0, but that was before he was one of the combine MVPs, with a 4.52 40, 36.5-inch vertical and 11-foot-1 broad jump, all of which ranked in the top three among defensive linemen. Some teams might see Reddick (6-1, 237) as an inside linebacker, but I think he also could play outside in a 3-4. He'll get in the backfield -- he had 21.5 tackles for loss last season. Reddick is also fundamentally sound, which is a big plus.

      14. *John Ross, WR, Washington

      Previous rank: NR

      Ross is my new No. 1 receiver, but it's not just because of his combine-record 4.22 40. It's partially due to the fact that the other top receivers, Clemson's Mike Williams and Western Michigan's Corey Davis, didn't run at the combine and we don't yet have true 40 numbers for them (Davis isn't having a pro day, either). And so I feel comfortable putting Ross, who was on my Big Board during the season, in the top spot. After major knee injuries cost him most of the 2014 season and all of 2015, Ross had a sensational 2016 season with 81 catches for 1,150 yards and 17 touchdowns. Ross isn't very big -- 5-11, 188 -- but he's not a guy who has to play in the slot. He can play outside at the next level.

      15. *Christian McCaffrey, RB, Stanford

      Previous rank: 16

      McCaffrey's 4.48 40 and 37.5-inch vertical should eliminate any doubts about his athleticism. He's going to be a really good pro. The Stanford offense was built around him for the past two years. He runs, catches passes, blocks and returns kicks and punts. With 590 carries for 3,622 yards and 82 catches for 955 yards the past two seasons, he has shown that he can carry the load. McCaffrey (5-11, 202) has incredible balance and could be an every-down back in the NFL. And it helps that he played in a pro-style offense at Stanford. His father, Ed, had a long NFL career as a wide receiver, and his brother, Max, was a good receiver at Duke.

      16. *Mike Williams, WR, Clemson

      Previous rank: 9

      Williams is expected to run at Clemson's pro day later this week, and he could jump back above Ross among receivers. A 40 in the low 4.5s is probably good enough for teams. On the field, Williams is a special receiver who measured 6-4, 218 at the combine. He made some fantastic catches in the national title game, finishing with eight receptions for 94 yards and a touchdown. Williams put behind the scary neck injury that prematurely ended his 2015 season, and he was Deshaun Watson's go-to target in 2016. He finished with 98 catches for 1,361 yards and 11 touchdowns.

      17. *Corey Davis, WR, Western Michigan

      Previous rank: 18

      One of the most productive receivers in the country over his career, Davis is a big-time playmaker with skills that will translate to the next level. He had 331 catches for 5,278 yards and 52 touchdowns in his career, and he led the country in receiving touchdowns with 19 in 2016. Davis has ideal size (6-3, 209) and length to be a great NFL wideout. I think he could be a lead option for an offense. He was considered one of the hardest workers on his team, too, and he really studies the game. Like I mentioned earlier, however, we still don't know his true speed -- an ankle injury kept him out of drills at the combine.

      18. *Mitchell Trubisky, QB, North Carolina

      Previous rank: 10

      I don't see a potential top-five talent at quarterback in this draft, but that doesn't mean a QB-needy team won't be desperate and pick one in the top five. I projected Trubisky, my top-ranked QB, to go No. 2 to San Francisco in Mock Draft 1.0 and 2.0. In his first year as the full-time starter, Trubisky (6-2, 222) completed 68.2 percent of his passes and had 30 touchdown passes and only six interceptions. He throws a nice ball, has some touch and velocity and is mobile too. Experience is a question mark: He just doesn't have a lot of tape.

      19. *Budda Baker, S, Washington

      Previous rank: NR

      The Huskies have been producing some stellar talent lately, and Baker could end up being the best of the bunch. If he were bigger, I think he'd be a top-15 pick, but the 5-10 frame will scare off a few teams. Baker is a great, versatile football player, though, who could play in the slot, play deep safety or help in run support in the box. He had two interceptions and three sacks last season, and he ran a 4.45 40 at the combine. Wherever he lands in the draft, I expect to see him on my Rookie Big Board throughout the 2017 season.

      20. **David Njoku, TE, Miami (Fla.)

      Previous rank: 22

      No longer a sleeper at this point, Njoku put on a show at the combine. He ran a 4.64 40, had a 37.5-inch vertical and 11-foot-1 broad jump at 6-4, 246. The third-year sophomore was fantastic down the stretch of the Hurricanes' 2016 season, with seven touchdowns over the last six games; he had just two career touchdowns before that. Njoku is among the most athletic tight ends in recent years. He could be a weapon in the NFL.

      21. *Derek Barnett, DE, Tennessee

      Previous rank: NR

      Barnett was stellar after a slow start to the 2016 season, with 13 sacks. That put him at 33 in his three years at Tennessee. Barnett (6-3, 259) is an all-around defender who beats double-teams, makes plays in the running game and gets after quarterbacks. I see him as a 4-3 defensive end in the NFL, not a 3-4 outside linebacker, but that shouldn't hurt his value.

      22. Tre'Davious White, CB, LSU

      Previous rank: 20

      White was impressive in his limited time at the Senior Bowl -- no receiver could get separation against him. He hurt his ankle in the middle of the week and didn't practice after that or play in the game, but I feel comfortable bumping him up a round after his solid senior season and how he looked against the wideouts at the Senior Bowl. White (5-11,192) could have been a Day 3 pick a year ago but made the right decision to return to school. His six career interceptions, including two in 2016, are fewer than you'd like to see from a first-round cornerback, but his ball skills are OK. He needs to catch some of the throws he breaks up.

      23. *Garett Bolles, OT, Utah

      Previous rank: 23

      Bolles started only one season for the Utes after coming over from a junior college, but he was tremendous in 2016. Playing left tackle for the Utes, he showed that he's a great run-blocker who can drive defenders off the ball at the snap. Bolles (6-5, 297) is a mauler, but he has nice feet too. His 4.95 40 at the combine was second among offensive lineman. Bolles needs to work on his technique and improve his pass blocking, but he could be the first tackle taken in April.

      24. *Deshaun Watson, QB, Clemson

      Previous rank: NR

      I've had Watson at No. 10 to the Bills in both Mock Draft 1.0 and 2.0, but this is his first appearance in the Big Board since the regular season. He really had an up-and-down 2016 season, and I thought he took a step back in decision-making from his stellar sophomore season. His 17 interceptions -- and 30 over the past two seasons -- are worrisome. But then you watch him play like he did in the national title game win over Alabama -- 36-of-56 passing for 420 yards, 43 rushing yards, four total TDs -- and you see a potential top-five pick. At 6-2, 221, Watson doesn't have ideal size, but he has the arm strength, toughness and athleticism to play for a long time. He just needs to put it all together consistently.

      25. Jarrad Davis, LB, Florida

      Previous rank: 15

      Injuries to both ankles caused Davis (6-1, 238) to miss a few games late in the season, and he didn't work out at the combine. But he is a steady, reliable linebacker with a nose for the football. He could play inside or outside linebacker in the NFL, but he's not a pass-rusher, though he did have 5.5 sacks the past two seasons. Davis is an every-down linebacker at the next level -- he can cover tight ends and backs in the passing game -- and fits what teams are looking for these days. He could play all three positions in a 4-3 defense or the inside in a 3-4. I love his intangibles too; he has tremendous character.
      I don't think there's a love affair going on between the front office and Bill O'Brien, good chance of a mutual separation after 2017. -- Lance Zierlein and Jayson Braddock

      Comment


      • #18
        Top 10 prospects at each position for 2017 NFL draft


        Mel Kiper Jr.Football analyst
        The latest Big Board is out, and so it's time for my updated top 10s after the NFL combine. There are quite a few changes throughout, particularly at wide receiver, cornerback, safety and guard.

        One asterisk denotes a junior, and two asterisks denote a redshirt sophomore for the 2016 season.


        Quarterbacks

        1. *Mitch Trubisky, North Carolina
        2. *Deshaun Watson, Clemson
        3. **DeShone Kizer, Notre Dame
        4. *Patrick Mahomes, Texas Tech
        5. Nathan Peterman, Pitt
        6. Davis Webb, California
        7. Chad Kelly, Mississippi
        8. *Brad Kaaya, Miami (Fla.)
        9. Joshua Dobbs, Tennessee
        10. C.J. Beathard, Iowa

        Mahomes (6-2, 225) was one of my risers from the combine. Peterman (6-2, 226) has also jumped a few spots, and I wouldn't be shocked if he went on Day 2 in the draft.


        Running backs

        1. *Leonard Fournette, LSU
        2. *Dalvin Cook, Florida State
        3. *Christian McCaffrey, Stanford
        4. *Alvin Kamara, Tennessee
        5. **Joe Mixon, Oklahoma
        6. *D'Onta Foreman, Texas
        7. Kareem Hunt, Toledo
        8. Joe Williams, Utah
        9. *Wayne Gallman, Clemson
        10. Matthew Dayes, NC State

        Kamara (5-10, 214) jumps a couple spots after showing off impressive athleticism at the combine (his 39.5-inch vertical was best among running backs). He split time in the backfield for the Volunteers and had only 210 carries in two seasons.


        Fullbacks

        1. George Kittle, Iowa
        2. Freddie Stevenson, Florida State
        3. Taylor McNamara, USC
        4. Sam Rogers, Virginia Tech
        5. Tyler McCloskey, Houston
        6. Marquez Williams, Miami (Fla.)
        7. Shane Smith, San Jose State
        8. Nate Iese, UCLA
        9. Anthony Firkser, Harvard
        10. Joe Bacci, Central Michigan

        I've moved Kittle (6-4, 247) over to fullback, and he's my new No. 1. He ran a 4.52 40, which was third-best among tight ends at the combine. He caught 42 passes with 10 touchdowns the past two seasons.


        Wide receivers

        1. *John Ross, Washington
        2. *Mike Williams, Clemson
        3. Corey Davis, Western Michigan
        4. Zay Jones, East Carolina
        5. *Curtis Samuel, Ohio State
        6. Cooper Kupp, Eastern Washington
        7. *Chris Godwin, Penn State
        8. *Carlos Henderson, Louisiana Tech
        9. *JuJu Smith-Schuster, USC
        10. Taywan Taylor, Western Kentucky

        The big change here is Ross (5-11, 188), who moves to the top spot. I'm still waiting on official 40 times from Williams (6-4, 218) and Davis (6-3, 209). Jones (6-2, 201) is another riser after the combine and the Senior Bowl.


        Tight ends

        1. O.J. Howard, Alabama
        2. **David Njoku, Miami (Fla.)
        3. Evan Engram, Mississippi
        4. *Adam Shaheen, Ashland
        5. *Bucky Hodges, Virginia Tech
        6. Gerald Everett, South Alabama
        7. Jake Butt, Michigan
        8. Jordan Leggett, Clemson
        9. Cole Hikutini, Louisville
        10. Jonnu Smith, Florida International

        Shaheen had a 32.5-inch vertical and ran a 4.79 40 at 6-6, 278. That's tremendous. He lit up the GLIAC in Division II with 127 catches for 1,670 yards and 26 touchdowns over the past two seasons.


        Offensive tackles

        1. *Garett Bolles, Utah
        2. *Cam Robinson, Alabama
        3. *Ryan Ramczyk, Wisconsin
        4. Antonio Garcia, Troy
        5. Taylor Moton, Western Michigan
        6. *Roderick Johnson, Florida State
        7. *David Sharpe, Florida
        8. Aviante Collins, TCU
        9. Will Holden, Vanderbilt
        10. Erik Magnuson, Michigan

        Not much change at the top. Collins ran a 4.81 40 at 6-4, 295, but his tape is inconsistent. Sharpe (6-6, 343) is another guy who is moving up.


        Offensive guards

        1. Forrest Lamp, Western Kentucky
        2. Dan Feeney, Indiana
        3. Dion Dawkins, Temple
        4. Jermaine Eluemunor, Texas A&M
        5. Dorian Johnson, Pittsurgh
        6. Danny Isidora, Miami (Fla.)
        7. Zach Banner, USC
        8. Nico Siragusa, San Diego State
        9. *Damien Mama, USC
        10. Isaac Asiata, Utah

        I have moved Dawkins (6-4, 314) and Eluemunor (6-4, 332) from tackle to guard after the combine. This is a solid guard class.


        Centers

        1. Ethan Pocic, LSU
        2. Pat Elflein, Ohio State
        3. Tyler Orlosky, West Virginia
        4. Kyle Fuller, Baylor
        5. J.J. Dielman, Utah
        6. Jon Toth, Kentucky
        7. Cameron Tom, Southern Mississippi
        8. Chase Roullier, Wyoming
        9. Jay Guillermo, Clemson
        10. Lucas Crowley, North Carolina

        Dielman (6-5, 309) is new to this top 10. He played in only five games in 2016 after a foot injury. He started more than 25 games at right tackle for the Utes.


        Defensive ends

        1. *Myles Garrett, Texas A&M
        2. Jonathan Allen, Alabama
        3. **Solomon Thomas, Stanford
        4. Taco Charlton, Michigan
        5. *Derek Barnett, Tennessee
        6. *Charles Harris, Missouri
        7. *Carl Lawson, Auburn
        8. Jordan Willis, Kansas State
        9. DeMarcus Walker, Florida State
        10. Trey Hendrickson, Florida Atlantic

        Hendrickson (6-4, 266) is a natural pass-rusher who could be taken in the third or fourth round. His 4.20 20-yard shuttle at the combine was second best among defensive linemen


        Defensive tackles

        1. *Malik McDowell, Michigan State
        2. *Caleb Brantley, Florida
        3. Carlos Watkins, Clemson
        4. Chris Wormley, Michigan
        5. Jaleel Johnson, Iowa
        6. Dalvin Tomlinson, Alabama
        7. Montravius Adams, Auburn
        8. Larry Ogunjobi, Charlotte
        9. *Elijah Qualls, Washington
        10. *Nazair Jones, North Carolina

        I don't have any defensive tackles on my Big Board. McDowell (6-6, 295) has all the talent to be a first-round pick, but he was inconsistent throughout his career with the Spartans.


        Inside linebackers

        1. Reuben Foster, Alabama
        2. Jarrad Davis, Florida
        3. *Raekwon McMillan, Ohio State
        4. *Zach Cunningham, Vanderbilt
        5. Kendell Beckwith, LSU
        6. *Anthony Walker Jr., Northwestern
        7. Ben Gedeon, Michigan
        8. Jayon Brown, UCLA
        9. Harvey Langi, BYU
        10. Blair Brown, Ohio

        Brown (6-0, 231) is a solid player who took Myles Jack's place in 2015. He had 2.5 sacks and three interceptions last season.


        Outside linebackers

        1. Takkarist McKinley, UCLA
        2. Haason Reddick, Temple
        3. *T.J. Watt, Wisconsin
        4. Tim Williams, Alabama
        5. Duke Riley, LSU
        6. Derek Rivers, Youngstown State
        7. Tyus Bowser, Houston
        8. Ryan Anderson, Alabama
        9. *Alex Anzalone, Florida
        10. Vince Biegel, Wisconsin

        Rivers (6-4, 248) had a great combine, running a 4.61 40 with 35 reps on the bench press and a 35-inch vertical. He could be a Day 2 pick.


        Cornerbacks

        1. **Marshon Lattimore, Ohio State
        2. Tre'Davious White, LSU
        3. *Gareon Conley, Ohio State
        4. **Marlon Humphrey, Alabama
        5. *Teez Tabor, CB, Florida
        6. *Quincy Wilson, Florida
        7. *Sidney Jones, Washington
        8. *Adoree' Jackson, USC
        9. Chidobe Awuzie, Colorado
        10. Kevin King, CB, Washington

        Tabor's 4.62 40 at 6-0, 199 was concerning, but he has a chance to run again at Florida's pro day. Humphrey (6-0, 197) ran a super impressive 4.41 40 at the combine. Jones (6-0, 186) drops a few spots after his injury at Washington's pro day.


        Safeties

        1. *Jamal Adams, LSU
        2. **Malik Hooker, Ohio State
        3. *Budda Baker, Washington
        4. **Jabrill Peppers, Michigan
        5. *Marcus Williams, Utah
        6. Obi Melifonwu, Connecticut
        7. Marcus Maye, Florida
        8. *Josh Jones, NC State
        9. Desmond King, Iowa
        10. Eddie Jackson, Alabama

        Baker (5-10, 195) and Hooker (6-1, 206) have moved ahead of Peppers (5-11, 213), who's no longer on my Big Board. He's an enigma in this class.


        Kickers and punters

        1. Zane Gonzalez, Arizona State (PK)
        2. Jake Elliott, Memphis (PK)
        3. Austin Rehkow, Idaho (P & PK)
        4. Justin Vogel, Miami (Fla.) (P)
        5. Toby Baker, Arkansas (P)
        6. Cameron Johnston, Ohio State (P)
        7. Younghoe Koo, Georgia Southern (PK)
        8. Hayden Hunt, Colorado State (P)
        9. Harrison Butker, Georgia Tech (PK)
        10. Eric Keena, North Texas (P)

        Gonzalez (6-0, 202) led the country in field goals made from 40-plus and 50-plus yards.
        I don't think there's a love affair going on between the front office and Bill O'Brien, good chance of a mutual separation after 2017. -- Lance Zierlein and Jayson Braddock

        Comment


        • #19
          McShay's Top 32: Deshaun Watson rising up the board

          With the NFL draft nearly a month away, let's take a look at which players have moved up and down our top 32, drawing on the same scouting reports as before and making changes where necessary.

          We'll continue to update our board as we get closer to the 2017 NFL draft and complete our evaluations. Although it's a given that some players will move into the rankings and others will drop out, this provides a good snapshot of which players currently have the most NFL potential, based on our evaluations.

          To see our top 10 players at each position, check out this article.

          Note: Underclassmen are marked with an asterisk.
          1. Myles Garrett, DE, Texas A&M*

          Grade: 95 | Previous Rank: 1

          Garrett is the best pure pass-rusher -- and one of the best overall athletes -- in the 2017 draft. You don't see many 272-pound men who run a 4.64 40 or jump 41 inches in the vertical. He played through an ankle injury for much of this past season and still finished tied for sixth in the SEC with 15 tackles for loss (including 8.5 sacks). He has a good combination of first-step quickness, bend, power and hand-fighting skills. Garrett can fit into any scheme. He's a transcendent-type player.

          2. Jonathan Allen, DT, Alabama

          Grade: 94 | Previous Rank: 2

          Allen is one of the most complete players in this class. He's absolutely dominant against the run (8.5 tackles for loss in his final five games) and has the ability to get after the passer from the interior (15 quarterback hurries and 10.5 sacks). Allen's quickness and power helps him constantly push the pocket. He brings tremendous experience to the table, with 56 games played.


          3. Jamal Adams, S, LSU*

          Grade: 93 | Previous Rank: 3

          Adams has an excellent blend of size, length and athleticism, and it shows up on tape. He's a difference-maker as an in-the-box defender, racking up seven tackles for loss in his last seven games. Adams didn't put on the best performance at the combine -- his 4.56 40 is slightly worse than average for safeties and his 31-inch vertical is well below average -- but he's still a top player in this class.

          4. Solomon Thomas, DE, Stanford*

          Grade: 93 | Previous Rank: 4

          Measuring 6-foot-2⅝ and 273 pounds, Thomas checks pretty much every box. His combination of quickness and power pops off the screen and helped make him one of the biggest draft risers this season. He has elite strength (30 reps on the bench) and he's tough to handle in every facet (15 tackles for loss, eight sacks and seven quarterback hurries).

          5. Reuben Foster, ILB, Alabama

          Grade: 92 | Previous Rank: 9

          The more tape I watch of Foster, the more I think he's the best pure football player in this draft. He flies to the ball, and when he gets there, he shows explosive tackling ability. Foster had 11.5 tackles for loss in his final 10 games of 2016. For a player his size (240 pounds), Foster shows a good combination of agility and speed. If he handles his business -- he was sent home early from the combine after a dustup with a hospital employee -- Foster can be a special NFL player.

          6. Leonard Fournette, RB, LSU*

          Grade: 92 | Previous Rank: 7

          Fournette, who had a nagging ankle injury all season, weighed in at 240 pounds at the combine. He carries the weight well -- and it didn't stop him from running a 4.51 40 -- but it's still a big number for a running back. When fully healthy, Fournette was as good as you'll ever see at the college level in terms of straight-line explosiveness. His angry running style is something at which to marvel, and it will translate well to the next level.

          7. Malik Hooker, S, Ohio State*

          Grade: 92 | Previous Rank: 5

          Hooker didn't work out at the combine after having surgery on his labrum and for a hernia, and it's unclear whether he'll be able to work out for teams at all prior to the draft. That shouldn't affect his draft stock too much. Only two players in college football had more interceptions in 2016 than Hooker's seven picks. In his first season as a starter, Hooker showed great instincts and range in coverage.

          8. O.J. Howard, TE, Alabama

          Grade: 92 | Previous Rank: 8

          Howard has the size (6-6, 251) and arm length (33 inches) to play as an in-line TE, and the elite speed (4.51 40) to be a major matchup problem down the field for opposing defenses. Howard has shown the ability to shine on the biggest stages (314 receiving yards and three touchdowns versus Clemson in the past two CFP title games), and he should thrive in a more pass-heavy NFL system.

          9. Marshon Lattimore, CB, Ohio State*

          Grade: 92 | Previous Rank: 6

          A first-year starter, Lattimore has truly elite cover skills, and he tested off the charts in Indianapolis -- 4.36 40, 38-inch vertical, 11-foot broad jump. But he tweaked his hamstring while working out, according to a report by ESPN's Adam Schefter. This bears watching considering Lattimore's history with hamstring injuries. At 6-foot, 192 pounds, Lattimore has good length and fluid movement skills. He took full advantage of his spike in playing time, with four interceptions and nine pass breakups this season.

          10. Dalvin Cook, RB, Florida State*

          Grade: 91 | Previous Rank: 10

          Cook, who ranked second in the FBS with 2,253 total yards this season, truly can do it all. He makes defenders miss with subtle changes in direction, and he doesn't need much of a crease to rattle off a big play. At 5-foot-10, 210 pounds and with 4.49 speed, Cook is a big play waiting to happen (18 touches of 25 yards or more in 2016, tied for first among all Power 5 running backs). He's also a very physical blocker in pass protection.

          11. Corey Davis, WR, Western Michigan

          Grade: 91 | Previous Rank: 12

          Davis' speed really stands out on tape. He looks like a 4.4 guy on tape, though NFL evaluators may not get a chance to see his true speed prior to the draft as he recovers from ankle surgery. He still has a chance to be a top-10 pick because of his size (6-foot-2, 205 pounds), smooth route-running skills and college production. Davis had 332 catches, 5,285 yards and 52 touchdowns at Western Michigan. Yes, he was playing mostly against MAC competition, but he dominated as you would expect from an elite talent.

          12. David Njoku, TE, Miami (Fla.)*

          Grade: 91 | Previous Rank: 14

          Njoku's measurables are a little freakish -- 6-foot-4 and 246 pounds with 35-inch arms. Those are good left tackle arms, which will obviously help him as a blocker and in contested-catch situations. He jumped out of the gym at the combine too, with a 37.5-inch vertical and an 11-foot-1 broad jump. A good college player who has the potential to develop into a better pro, Njoku averaged 16.2 yards per reception in 2016.

          13. Forrest Lamp, G, Western Kentucky

          Grade: 91 | Previous Rank: 19

          Lamp is the best all-around offensive lineman in this draft. He played left tackle in college, but projects as a guard in the NFL because of his below-average arm length (32 inches). Lamp started 51 total games for Western Kentucky, most of which were at left tackle. He's a smooth mover and an excellent athlete. His tape against Alabama (particularly Tim Williams) was awesome.

          14. Mike Williams, WR, Clemson*

          Grade: 90 | Previous Rank: 15

          Williams ran his 40-yard dash in the low 4.4s at Clemson's pro day, a good time for a player of his size (6-foot-3, 218 pounds). While Williams will need to expand his route tree at the next level, he's an elite WR when the ball is in the air, and he physically dominated against Alabama in the CFP National Championship. The bottom line with Williams: If you believe in your receivers coach's ability to bring him along, he has a ton of awesome tools to work with.

          15. Garett Bolles, OT, Utah*

          Grade: 90 | Previous Rank: 18

          A junior-college transfer, Bolles made 12 starts at left tackle in his lone season at Utah. Bolles -- who has room to add bulk and strength to his 6-foot-5, 297-pound frame -- shows an excellent combination of length, flexibility and athleticism. He's the most athletic left tackle prospect in this class, and he plays with an edge.

          16. John Ross, WR, Washington

          Grade: 90 | Previous Rank: 16

          You might have heard: Ross broke the modern combine record by running a 4.22 40-yard dash. But one thing I want to make really clear: He's not a combine creation; this is a really good football player who looks like a first-rounder on tape. Ross has savvy route-running ability, reliable hands and, yes, blazing speed on the field. He's also a good returner, having scored four return touchdowns in his three seasons at Washington. Ross has a chance to be a top-15 pick.

          17. Taco Charlton, DE, Michigan

          Grade: 90 | Previous Rank: 17

          Charlton finished the season on a tear, compiling 10 sacks in his final 10 games. He has always had the raw ability, but this past season he showed more consistency and refined technique. Charlton, who fits best as a 4-3 DE, is one of the more underrated players in this group.

          18. Derek Barnett, DE, Tennessee*

          Grade: 89 | Previous Rank: 22

          Barnett isn't an elite athlete, but he plays with good discipline, a consistent motor and impressive physicality. He also had ridiculous production the past two seasons (23.0 sacks and 31.5 tackles for loss). At 259 pounds, he's not a guy who's going to overwhelm offensive tackles by converting speed to power.

          19. Christian McCaffrey, RB, Stanford*

          Grade: 89 | Previous Rank: 27

          McCaffrey took full advantage of his opportunity at the combine, running a 4.48 40 and the second-fastest three-cone for a RB since 2006 (6.57). I was pleasantly surprised by McCaffrey's straight-line speed, but the short-area quickness measured by the three-cone definitely shows up on tape. If you draft McCaffrey, you're getting a really good running back and wide receiver. You can't say that about many guys.

          20. Malik McDowell, DT, Michigan State*

          Grade: 89 | Previous Rank: 20

          McDowell is arguably the most physically gifted interior pass-rusher in this class. He didn't play with the same passion and toughness this past season, which is a red flag. But McDowell has elite athleticism and can play multiple positions along the D-line at the next level. He could be a steal in the mid-to-late first round if he lands with the right coaching staff to develop him and keep him motivated.

          21. Ryan Ramczyk, OT, Wisconsin*

          Grade: 89 | Previous Rank: 21

          Ramczyk has just one year of major college experience after transferring to Wisconsin from UW-Stevens Point (Division III) and is coming off hip surgery in January that bears monitoring. With an ideal frame (6-foot-6, 310 pounds), Ramczyk proved to be consistent as a run-blocker and in pass protection in 2016.

          22. Deshaun Watson, QB, Clemson*

          Grade: 89 | Previous Rank: 36

          The more I talk to teams and dig into Watson's background, the more impressed I get. From a determination and drive standpoint, he shares the same qualities that almost all top-tier NFL QBs have. If I had to bet on one of the top quarterbacks in this class -- Watson, UNC's Mitchell Trubisky or Notre Dame's DeShone Kizer -- I'd pick Watson. He has the kind of makeup to overcome his weaknesses, particularly if he lands with a team determined to keep him on the sideline early in his career.

          23. Tre'Davious White, CB, LSU

          Grade: 89 | Previous Rank: 23

          White is one of the most experienced players in this class, having started 47 games in his LSU career. His elite football instincts and good overall feel for route combinations were on full display at the Senior Bowl practices. White doesn't have great ball production (only six career interceptions), but he has good speed (4.47 40) and brings added value as a punt returner.

          24. Takkarist McKinley, OLB, UCLA

          Grade: 89 | Previous Rank: 24

          At 6-foot-2 and 250 pounds, McKinley plays harder than any pass-rusher I've watched in years. He has really long arms (34 inches) and terrific speed (4.59 40), but he hasn't quite figured out how to use his hands. It might take McKinley a little bit to refine his technique, but he's not a guy I'd bet against.

          25. Charles Harris, OLB, Missouri*

          Grade: 88 | Previous Rank: 33

          Harris started all 24 games for Missouri the past two seasons, racking up 30.5 tackles for loss, 16 sacks and four forced fumbles. He needs to continue to get strong, but Harris shows relentless energy. He could sneak into the bottom of the first round for a team looking for a pass-rusher with developmental upside (he didn't play football until his junior year of high school).

          26. Budda Baker, S, Washington*

          Grade: 88 | Previous Rank: 28

          At 5-foot-9⅝ and 195 pounds, Baker lacks ideal size, but when you watch the film, he's all over the field and he doesn't have many other weaknesses. A three-year starter, Baker was the only Pac-12 defensive back to finish this season with double-digit tackles for loss. He also had two interceptions and six pass breakups. He has a lot of Tyrann Mathieu-like qualities

          27. Haason Reddick, ILB, Temple

          Grade: 88 | Previous Rank: 25

          Reddick played defensive end in college, but he'll be an off-the-ball linebacker in the pros, similar to the transition Tedy Bruschi made coming out of Arizona. He ran a 4.52 40 at 6-foot-1 and 237 pounds. That's outstanding. And his 11-foot-1 broad jump marked just the third time since 2006 that a linebacker eclipsed the 11-foot mark in Indy. Over the span of about six weeks, Reddick has gone from a virtual unknown to having a legitimate chance to be a first-round pick.

          28. Alvin Kamara, RB, Tennessee*

          Grade: 88 | Previous Rank: 26

          Kamara is just so explosive, posting the best vertical jump (39.5 inches) and broad jump (10 feet, 11 inches) among all the running backs at the combine. He has prototypical size at 5-foot-10 and 214 pounds, exceptional vision/lateral quickness, and the power to break a lot of tackles. Kamara has the skill set of a first-rounder, but the on-field sample size with him isn't very large (he averaged just 8.75 carries per game in his final two seasons).

          29. Quincy Wilson, CB, Florida*

          Grade: 88 | Previous Rank: 29

          The more I watch Wilson, the more impressed I get. His technique isn't quite as smooth as his teammate Teez Tabor (No. 32 on this list), but he has better top-end speed (4.54 vs. 4.62). At 6-foot-1, Wilson has good length, and he's experienced, with 39 games played, including 24 starts.

          30. Obi Melifonwu, S, Connecticut

          Grade: 87 | Previous Rank: 40

          Melifonwu has off-the-charts athleticism in every way. Measuring just shy of 6-foot-4 and 224 pounds, Melifonwu jumped out of the gym (44-inch vertical and 11-9 broad jump), and he ran the 40 in 4.40 seconds, an elite time for any safety, let alone one who weighs 224. In a league in which length, size and athleticism are coveted more than ever among defensive backs, Melifonwu has intriguing upside.

          31. Mitch Trubisky, QB, North Carolina*

          Grade: 87 | Previous Rank: 30

          There's a lot to like about Trubisky's tape. He flashes the ability to go through progressions, and he's the most accurate quarterback in this class. I love Trubisky's pocket presence but have concerns about some of the critical errors he made, including two bad interceptions versus Stanford. Trubisky's 13 career starts also makes him a tough evaluation; the history of quarterbacks leaving school early without a ton of game reps isn't great (just look at Mark Sanchez). But with the lack of top-end talent in this draft class and the number of teams drafting in the top 10 that need new blood at the position, Trubisky could be a high pick come April.

          32. Teez Tabor, CB, Florida*

          Grade: 87 | Previous Rank: 11

          Tabor is really smooth and quick, but what makes him really good is how effective he is at using his hands. That's vital in the NFL when you're working against receivers who know how to get off press coverage. One major red flag? Tabor ran a 4.62 40 at the combine. That's not a good number for a cornerback. His elite instincts make up a little bit for the lack of top-end speed, but I'll be interested to see what he runs at Florida's pro day.
          I don't think there's a love affair going on between the front office and Bill O'Brien, good chance of a mutual separation after 2017. -- Lance Zierlein and Jayson Braddock

          Comment


          • #20
            McShay's tier rankings for 2017 NFL draft

            As the 2017 NFL draft draws closer, it's time to run through our draft tier rankings, which uses our grades to separate prospects into different segments. This is helpful when comparing players who are close to each other in the rankings. It also helps in predicting where players will come off the board during the first three rounds of the draft.

            Here are our draft tiers for 2017, covering every prospect with a first-, second- or third-round grade. (I've put each player's grade in parentheses next to his name.)
            Tier 1

            The elite class of the 2017 NFL draft. These players should be starters from Day 1 and project as perennial Pro Bowl players.

            2017: 1 player | 2016 (at this point in the process): 3 players

            1. Myles Garrett, DE, Texas A&M (Grade: 95)*

            Garrett has the top tier all to himself after shining during the pre-draft process. We already knew he had fantastic tape and production (48.5 tackles for loss, 32.5 sacks and five forced fumbles in 36 starts), but he posted one of the best combine performances I've ever seen, just for good measure. At 6-foot-4 and 272 pounds, he ran a 4.64 40 and jumped 41 inches in the vertical. The Browns should just turn in the card now. Garrett has to be the pick at No. 1 overall.

            Tier 2

            A notch below the elite class but still worthy of top-20 picks in most drafts. These picks are expected to be plug-and-play starters.

            2017: 8 players | 2016: 8 players

            2. Jonathan Allen, DT, Alabama (94)
            3. Solomon Thomas, DE, Stanford (93)*
            4. Jamal Adams, S, LSU (93)*
            5. Leonard Fournette, RB, LSU (92)*
            6. Marshon Lattimore, CB, Ohio State (92)*
            7. Malik Hooker, S, Ohio State (92)*
            8. Reuben Foster, ILB, Alabama (92)
            9. O.J. Howard, TE, Alabama (92)

            Ignore the noise surrounding Allen's poor combine workout; just turn on the tape and watch this guy play. He has a great work ethic, and it shows up on the field. Howard, Allen's Alabama teammate, has a real chance to become the first tight end selected in the top nine of the draft since Vernon Davis in 2006. Fournette stands above the rest in an elite running back class. He has the size (6-foot-, 240), speed (4.51) and power to be a feature back, ideally in a power-blocking scheme.

            Tier 3

            These players carry late first-round grades.

            2017: 10 players | 2016: 11 players

            10. Forrest Lamp, G, Western Kentucky (91)
            11. Corey Davis, WR, Western Michigan (91)
            12. Mike Williams, WR, Clemson (91)*
            13. Haason Reddick, ILB, Temple (90)
            14. Derek Barnett, DE, Tennessee (90)*
            15. David Njoku, TE, Miami (Fla.)(90)*
            16. Garett Bolles, OT, Utah (90)*
            17. Christian McCaffrey, RB, Stanford (90)*
            18. Kevin King, CB, Washington (90)
            19. John Ross, WR, Washington (90)*

            It isn't often that you see the first offensive lineman in Tier 3, but such is the case for this class right now. Lamp continues to move up my rankings because of his exceptional athleticism. The race between Davis and Williams for the No. 1 WR ranking could not be tighter. Davis has great speed on tape and elite production, while Williams has the best ball skills of any WR in this draft. McCaffrey now has a small lead on Florida State's Dalvin Cook for the No. 2 RB spot. The Stanford product shined at the combine and will help his NFL team in a variety of ways.

            Tier 4

            Would rather not reach for these prospects late in the first round, but they're good value picks in the first half of Round 2.

            2017: 27 players | 2016: 23 players

            20. Dalvin Cook, RB, Florida State (89)*
            21. Gareon Conley, CB, Ohio State (89)*
            22. Taco Charlton, DE, Michigan (89)
            23. Takkarist McKinley, OLB, UCLA (89)
            24. Deshaun Watson, QB, Clemson (89)*
            25. Malik McDowell, DT, Michigan State (89)*
            26. Charles Harris, OLB, Missouri (88)*
            27. Ryan Ramczyk, OT, Wisconsin (88)*
            28. Jarrad Davis, ILB, Florida (88)
            29. Budda Baker, S, Washington (88)*
            30. Quincy Wilson, CB, Florida (88)*
            31. Mitchell Trubisky, QB, North Carolina (88)*
            32. Tre'Davious White, CB, LSU (87)
            33. Cam Robinson, OT, Alabama (87)*
            34. Obi Melifonwu, S, Connecticut (87)
            35. Marlon Humphrey, CB, Alabama (87)*
            36. Evan Engram, TE, Mississippi (85)
            37. Alvin Kamara, RB, Tennessee (86)*
            38. Tyus Bowser, OLB, Houston (86)
            39. Zay Jones, WR, East Carolina (86)
            40. Caleb Brantley, DT, Florida (86)*
            41. Jourdan Lewis, CB, Michigan (86)
            42. Marcus Maye, S, Florida (86)
            43. Adoree' Jackson, CB, USC (86)*
            44. Jabrill Peppers, S, Michigan (85)*
            45. DeShone Kizer, QB, Notre Dame (85)*
            46. Tim Williams, OLB, Alabama (85)

            This is where the top three quarterbacks fall on my board (for now). It isn't an elite class at the top end of the position -- there are no Andrew Luck types who deserve to be the No. 1 pick -- but if given time to develop, Watson, Trubisky and Kizer have the tools to grow into solid NFL starters. If you can't tell, this is an extremely deep DB class, with 14 cornerbacks/safeties in the first four tiers. At this point last year, I had seven DBs ranked in Tiers 1-4.

            Tier 5

            These players are middle- or late-second-round prospects.

            2017: 14 players | 2016: 18 players

            47. T.J. Watt, OLB, Wisconsin (84)*
            48. JuJu Smith-Schuster, WR, USC (84)*
            49. Patrick Mahomes II, QB, Texas Tech (83)*
            50. Curtis Samuel, WR, Ohio State (83)*
            51. Teez Tabor, CB, Florida (83)*
            52. Jordan Willis, DE, Kansas State (82)
            53. Chidobe Awuzie, CB, Colorado (81)
            54. Zach Cunningham, ILB, Vanderbilt (81)*
            55. Josh Jones, S, North Carolina State (81)*
            56. Joe Mixon, RB, Oklahoma (80)*
            57. Ryan Anderson, OLB, Alabama (80)
            58. Fabian Moreau, CB, UCLA (80)
            59. Taylor Moton, G, Western Michigan (80)
            60. Adam Shaheen, TE, Ashland (80)*
            61. Larry Ogunjobi, DT, Charlotte (80)

            At Nos. 51 and 52 are two players who went in opposite directions during the pre-draft process. Headed into the combine, I thought Tabor had a chance to be a top-15 pick based on his tape. But he posted a 4.62 40-yard dash at the combine, which is a red-flag number at the position. Willis, meanwhile, showed off incredible explosiveness for a 255-pounder: 4.53 40, 39-inch vertical, 4.28-second short shuttle. Based purely on his football skills, Mixon would rank a lot higher on this list, but a 2014 incident in which he punched a woman and broke four bones in her face will cause some teams to take him off their boards entirely.

            Tier 6

            These players are third-round prospects. They could develop into solid starters, but they either have limited upside or come with a higher element of risk than players worth drafting in the first two rounds.

            2017: 49 players | 2016: 42 players

            62. Dion Dawkins, G, Temple (79)
            63. Gerald Everett, TE, South Alabama (79)
            64. Desmond King, CB, Iowa (79)
            65. Cooper Kupp, WR, Eastern Washington (79)
            66. Derek Rivers, OLB, Youngstown (79)
            67. Chris Wormley, DT, Michigan (79)
            68. Joshua Dobbs, QB, Tennessee (79)
            69. Jake Butt, TE, Michigan (78)
            70. Dan Feeney, G, Indiana (78)
            71. Carlos Henderson, WR, Louisiana Tech (78)*
            72. Damontae Kazee, CB, San Diego State (78)
            73. Raekwon McMillan, ILB, Ohio State (78)*
            74. Marcus Williams, S, Utah (78)*
            75. Jermaine Eluemunor, OT, Texas A&M (78)
            76. Carlos Watkins, DT, Clemson (78)
            77. Samaje Perine, RB, Oklahoma (77)*
            78. Nathan Peterman, QB, Pittsburgh (77)
            79. Justin Evans, S, Texas A&M (77)
            80. Sidney Jones, CB, Washington (77)*
            81. Taywan Taylor, WR, Western Kentucky (77)
            82. Jaleel Johnson, DT, Iowa (77)
            83. Mack Hollins, WR, North Carolina (76)
            84. Bucky Hodges, TE, Virginia Tech (76)*
            85. DeMarcus Walker, DE, Florida State (76)
            86. Dalvin Tomlinson, DT, Alabama (76)
            87. Kendell Beckwith, ILB, LSU (75)
            88. Chris Godwin, WR, Penn State (75)*
            89. Pat Elflein, C, Ohio State (75)
            90. D'Onta Foreman, RB, Texas (75)*
            91. Tanoh Kpassagnon, DE, Villanova (75)
            92. Dorian Johnson, G, Pittsburgh (75)
            93. Jordan Leggett, TE, Clemson (75)
            94. Montravius Adams, DT, Auburn (75)
            95. Cameron Sutton, CB, Tennessee (75)
            96. Kareem Hunt, RB, Toledo (74)
            97. Duke Riley, ILB, LSU (74)
            98. ArDarius Stewart, WR, Alabama (74)*
            99. Malachi Dupre, WR, LSU (73)*
            100. Carl Lawson, DE, Auburn (73)*
            101. Tarell Basham, DE, Ohio (72)
            102. Rasul Douglas, CB, West Virginia (72)
            103. Alex Anzalone, ILB, Florida (71)*
            104. Roderick Johnson, OT, Florida State (71)*
            105. Zach Banner, OT, USC (70)
            106. Antonio Garcia, G, Troy (70)
            107. Trey Hendrickson, DE, Florida Atlantic (70)
            108. Cole Hikutini, TE, Louisville (70)
            109. John Johnson, S, Boston College (70)
            110. Davis Webb, QB, California (70)

            This is a good draft to have compensatory selections stockpiled in the third round. I have seven more players with third-round grades this year than I did at this point in 2016. This subset of prospects is a great example of the tight end depth in this class. I have five TEs in Tier 6 and nine players at the position in Tiers 1-6. Last year's numbers at the position? One TE in Tier 6 and just four in Tiers 1-6. Don't overlook South Alabama's Gerald Everett. He has played football only since his senior year in high school, but he has the speed, athleticism and ball skills to become a pass-catching mismatch in the NFL.
            Last edited by H2O4me; 2 weeks ago.
            I don't think there's a love affair going on between the front office and Bill O'Brien, good chance of a mutual separation after 2017. -- Lance Zierlein and Jayson Braddock

            Comment


            • #21
              McShay's Top 32: Christian McCaffrey rising up the board

              With the NFL draft less than two weeks away, let's take a look at which players have moved up and down our Top 32, drawing on the same scouting reports as before and making changes where necessary.

              This is the last Top 32 update we'll have before unveiling our final Tier Rankings and our Top 300 players for the 2017 NFL draft next week.

              To see our top 10 players at each position, check out this article.

              Note: Underclassmen are marked with an asterisk.
              1. Myles Garrett, DE, Texas A&M*


              Grade: 95 | Previous Rank: 1

              Garrett is the best pure pass-rusher -- and one of the best overall athletes -- in the 2017 draft. You don't see many 272-pound men who run a 4.64 40 or jump 41 inches in the vertical. He played through an ankle injury for much of this past season and still finished tied for sixth in the SEC with 15 tackles for loss (including 8.5 sacks). He has a good combination of first-step quickness, bend, power and hand-fighting skills. Garrett can fit into any scheme. He's a transcendent type of player. Watch highlights.

              2. Jamal Adams, S, LSU*

              Grade: 93 | Previous Rank: 4

              Adams has an excellent blend of size, length and athleticism, and it shows up on tape. He's a difference-maker as an in-the-box defender, racking up seven tackles for loss in his last seven games of 2016. Adams is also reliable in coverage; he shows the ability to both cover the slot and patrol the deep half. Watch highlights.


              3. Jonathan Allen, DT, Alabama

              Grade: 93 | Previous Rank: 2

              Stick with the tape on Allen. He's still one of the most complete players in this class, even after mediocre workouts. Allen's quickness and power help him constantly push the pocket as a pass-rusher, and he had 22.5 sacks in the past two seasons. He also brings tremendous experience to the table, with 56 games played. Watch highlights.


              4. Solomon Thomas, DE, Stanford*

              Grade: 92 | Previous Rank: 3

              Thomas has been in my top five overall prospects from the moment I watched his tape. Measuring 6-foot-2⅝ and 273 pounds, he's the total package, with the ideal combination of size, quickness and power. Thomas has elite strength (30 reps on the bench), and he's tough to handle in every facet (15 tackles for loss, eight sacks and seven quarterback hurries). Watch highlights.


              5. Malik Hooker, S, Ohio State*

              Grade: 92 | Previous Rank: 7

              Speed, range and ball skills -- that's what Hooker brings. His durability is a question mark, and he's still recovering from offseason shoulder and hernia surgeries, but he had elite production at Ohio State, posting seven interceptions last season. Watch highlights.


              6. Marshon Lattimore, CB, Ohio State*

              Grade: 92 | Previous Rank: 6

              Lattimore has truly elite cover skills, and he tested off the charts in Indianapolis -- 4.36 40, 38-inch vertical, 11-foot broad jump. But he tweaked his hamstring while working out, according to a report by ESPN's Adam Schefter, and has a history of hamstring injuries. At 6-foot, 192 pounds, Lattimore has good length and fluid movement skills. He took full advantage of his first year as a starter, with four interceptions and nine pass breakups last season. Watch highlights.


              7. Leonard Fournette, RB, LSU*

              Grade: 92 | Previous Rank: 5

              Fournette has a rare combination of speed (4.51 40), power and size (his playing weight will be in the 230s). His angry running style is a great fit for a power-running scheme. Durability is a slight concern after compiling 647 touches at LSU, and he's still developing as a pass-catcher. Watch highlights.


              8. O.J. Howard, TE, Alabama

              Grade: 92 | Previous Rank: 9

              Howard has the size (6-foot-6, 251) and arm length (33 inches) to play as an in-line TE, and the elite speed (4.51 40) to be a major matchup problem as a pass-catcher. Howard has shown the ability to shine on the biggest stages (314 receiving yards and three touchdowns versus Clemson in the past two CFP title games), and he should thrive in a more pass-heavy NFL system. Watch highlights.


              9. Reuben Foster, ILB, Alabama

              Grade: 92 | Previous Rank: 8

              Multiple scouts have voiced concerns to me about who Foster surrounds himself with, but he's one of the 10 best football players in the draft. He flies to the ball, and when he gets there, he shows explosive tackling ability. Foster had 11.5 tackles for loss in his final 10 games of 2016. Watch highlights.


              10. Christian McCaffrey, RB, Stanford*

              Grade: 91 | Previous Rank: 17

              McCaffrey is one of the three best slot receivers in this draft, and he's not too shabby of a running back either. That kind of versatility gives him a ton of value in the NFL. McCaffrey took full advantage of his opportunity at the combine, running a 4.48 40 and the second-fastest three-cone drill for a RB since 2006 (6.57). I was pleasantly surprised by McCaffrey's straight-line speed, but the short-area quickness measured by the three-cone definitely shows up on tape. Watch highlights.


              11. Derek Barnett, DE, Tennessee*

              Grade: 91 | Previous Rank: 14

              Barnett isn't an elite athlete, but he plays with good discipline, a consistent motor and impressive physicality. He terrific at using his hands, which is part of the reason he posted ridiculous production the past two seasons (23.0 sacks and 31.5 tackles for loss). At 259 pounds, he's not a guy who will overwhelm offensive tackles by converting speed to power. Watch highlights.


              12. Mike Williams, WR, Clemson*

              Grade: 91 | Previous Rank: 12

              Williams ran his 40-yard dash in the low 4.5s at Clemson's pro day, a good time for a player of his size (6-foot-3, 218 pounds). Though Williams will need to expand his route tree at the next level, he's an elite receiver when the ball is in the air. The bottom line with Williams: If you believe in your receivers coach's ability to bring him along, he has a ton of awesome tools to work with. Watch highlights.


              13. David Njoku, TE, Miami (Fla.)*

              Grade: 90 | Previous Rank: 15

              Njoku's measurables are a little freakish -- 6-foot-4 and 246 pounds with 35-inch arms. Those are good left tackle arms, which will obviously help him as a blocker and in contested-catch situations. He jumped out of the gym at the combine too, with a 37.5-inch vertical and an 11-foot-1 broad jump. A good college player who has the potential to develop into a better pro, Njoku averaged 16.2 yards per reception in 2016. Watch highlights.


              14. Forrest Lamp, G, Western Kentucky

              Grade: 90 | Previous Rank: 10

              Lamp is the best all-around offensive lineman in this draft. He played left tackle in college but projects as a guard in the NFL because of his below-average arm length (32 inches). Lamp started 51 total games for Western Kentucky, most of which were at left tackle. He's a smooth mover and an excellent athlete. His tape against Alabama (particularly Tim Williams) was awesome. Watch highlights.


              15. Haason Reddick, ILB, Temple

              Grade: 90 | Previous Rank: 13

              Reddick played defensive end in college, but he'll be an off-the-ball linebacker in the pros, similar to the transition Tedy Bruschi made coming out of Arizona. He ran a 4.52 40 at 6-foot-1 and 237 pounds. That's outstanding. And his 11-foot-1 broad jump marked just the third time since 2006 that a linebacker eclipsed the 11-foot mark in Indy. Reddick has boosted his stock more than any other player during the pre-draft process. Watch highlights.


              16. Dalvin Cook, RB, Florida State*

              Grade: 90 | Previous Rank: 20

              Cook, who ranked second in the FBS with 2,253 total yards this season, truly can do it all. He makes defenders miss with subtle changes in direction, and he doesn't need much of a crease to rattle off a big play. At 5-foot-10, 210 pounds and with 4.49 speed, Cook is a big play waiting to happen. But character red flags and ball security issues could cause him to fall a bit in Round 1. Watch highlights.


              17. John Ross, WR, Washington

              Grade: 90 | Previous Rank: 19

              Ross wowed at the combine by breaking the modern record with a 4.22 40-yard dash. But one thing I want to make really clear: He's not a one-tricky pony. Some guys are straight-line fast, others are quick and twitchy; Ross is both, which makes him special. Ross shows savvy route-running ability and reliable hands. He's also a good returner, having scored four return touchdowns in his three seasons at Washington. Watch highlights.


              18. Gareon Conley, CB, Ohio State*

              Grade: 90 | Previous Rank: 21

              Conley has good tape, and his ball skills really stand out. His combine performance has helped boost his stock. He ran a 4.44 40 at 6-foot and 195 pounds. Conley shows excellent ball skills on tape, and teams will like his length (33-inch arms) and experience (26 starts). Watch highlights.


              19. Takkarist McKinley, OLB, UCLA

              Grade: 90 | Previous Rank: 23

              At 6-foot-2 and 250 pounds, McKinley plays harder than any pass-rusher I've watched in years. He has really long arms (34 inches) and terrific speed (4.59 40), but he hasn't quite figured out how to use his hands. While it might take McKinley a little bit to refine his technique, he's not a guy I'd bet against after seeing what he's overcome in life. Watch highlights.


              20. Corey Davis, WR, Western Michigan

              Grade: 90 | Previous Rank: 11

              Davis' speed really stands out. He looks like a 4.4 guy on tape, though it looks as if NFL evaluators might not get a chance to see him run the 40 before the draft as he recovers from ankle surgery. He still has a chance to be a top-15 pick because of his size (6-foot-2, 205 pounds), smooth route-running skills and college production. Davis had 332 catches, 5,285 yards and 52 touchdowns at Western Michigan. Yes, he was playing mostly against MAC competition, but he dominated in the way you would expect from an elite talent. Watch highlights.


              21. Garett Bolles, OT, Utah*

              Grade: 90 | Previous Rank: 16

              The most athletic left tackle prospect in this class, Bolles shows very good lateral agility in pass protection. And I love that he plays with an edge. A junior college transfer, Bolles made 12 starts at left tackle in his lone season at Utah. Bolles' inexperience and durability issues are negatives, and he needs to add bulk and strength to his 6-foot-5, 297-pound frame. Watch highlights.


              22. Kevin King, CB, Washington

              Grade: 90 | Previous Rank: 18

              King has terrific length, standing 6-foot-3 with 32-inch arms. He also showed outstanding explosiveness for a player his size (4.43 40 and a 39-inch vertical). King has experience playing slot CB and safety in addition to outside cornerback, and he posted good ball production in his career (21 pass breakups, six interceptions). Watch highlights.


              23. Jarrad Davis, ILB, Florida*

              Grade: 89 | Previous Rank: 28

              At 6-foot-1 and 238 pounds, Davis is an explosive athlete with great range who profiles as an every-down player in the NFL. He could also play middle linebacker if he bulked up a bit. Davis, who reminds me of Bucs OLB Kwon Alexander, finds so many ways to affect a game. Watch highlights.


              24. Mitchell Trubisky, QB, North Carolina*

              Grade: 89 | Previous Rank: 31

              Trubisky enters the NFL with only 13 collegiate starts under his belt, and it will be interesting to see how teams weigh that against his tape. He shows very good pocket presence and accuracy (68.2 completion rate), and he has the frame (6-foot-2, 222 pounds), arm strength and mobility to become an effective NFL starter. Watch highlights.


              25. Charles Harris, OLB, Missouri*

              Grade: 89 | Previous Rank: 26

              Harris started all 24 games for Missouri in his final two seasons, racking up 30.5 tackles for loss, 16 sacks and four forced fumbles. He needs to continue to get stronger, but Harris shows relentless energy and an elite first step off the edge. He could sneak into the bottom of the first round for a team looking for a pass-rusher with developmental upside (he didn't play football until his junior year of high school). Watch highlights.


              26. Malik McDowell, DT, Michigan State*

              Grade: 89 | Previous Rank: 25

              McDowell didn't play with the same passion and toughness this past season, which is a red flag. But he's arguably the most physically gifted interior pass-rusher in this class. McDowell can play multiple positions along the D-line at the next level. He could be a steal in the mid-to-late first round if he lands with the right coaching staff to develop him and keep him motivated. Watch highlights.


              27. Marlon Humphrey, CB, Alabama*

              Grade: 89 | Previous Rank: 35

              I love the way Humphrey competes as a run defender. Because of his size (6-foot, 197 pounds) and fluidity in coverage, Humphrey has one of the highest ceilings of any cornerback in this year's class, but he needs to improve his ball skills. He fits best in a press-heavy scheme. Watch highlights.


              28. Deshaun Watson, QB, Clemson*

              Grade: 88 | Previous Rank: 24

              From a determination and drive standpoint, Watson shares the same qualities that almost all top-tier NFL quarterbacks have. But he needs to improve his deep accuracy and will have a steep learning curve coming from Clemson's spread offense. Watson has the kind of makeup to overcome his weaknesses. For his sake, I'd like to see him land with a team that keeps him on the sideline early in his career so he can continue to develop. Watch highlights.


              29. Cam Robinson, OT, Alabama*

              Grade: 88 | Previous Rank: 33

              I'm not as high on Robinson as others, but he was durable in college, starting all 43 games for Alabama the past three seasons. He possesses excellent length (35-inch arms) and is an elite mauler in the running game. Robinson needs to become more consistent in pass protection, particularly with his footwork. Watch highlights.


              30. Quincy Wilson, CB, Florida*

              Grade: 88 | Previous Rank: 30

              At 6-foot-1 and 211 pounds, Wilson combines good length with some of the best ball skills of any defensive back in this class (14 pass breakups and six interceptions). He doesn't have elite mirroring skills, but his experience (24 starts, 39 games played) shows in the way he reads the field. Watch highlights.


              31. Adoree' Jackson, CB, USC*

              Grade: 88 | Previous Rank: 43

              Jackson has a chance to have an immediate impact as a returner. He had four return touchdowns last season (two on punts, two on kickoffs) and eight total for his career. Jackson's technique in coverage still needs polishing, but he has elite ball skills and the versatility to make an impact in a number of ways (including on offense). Watch highlights.


              32. T.J. Watt, OLB, Wisconsin*

              Grade: 88 | Previous Rank: 47

              Watt continues to move up the board, despite having only one year of notable production at linebacker after suffering a season-ending knee injury in 2014 and undergoing a position change from tight end. He has the frame (6-foot-4, 252 pound) and athleticism (4.69 40, 10-8 broad jump) to be an impact pass-rusher. Watch highlights.
              I don't think there's a love affair going on between the front office and Bill O'Brien, good chance of a mutual separation after 2017. -- Lance Zierlein and Jayson Braddock

              Comment


              • #22
                McShay's final tier rankings for 2017 NFL draft

                As the 2017 NFL draft draws closer, it's time to finalize our draft tier rankings, which uses our grades to separate prospects into segments. This is helpful when comparing players who are close to each other in the rankings. It also helps in predicting where players will come off the board during the first three rounds of the draft.

                Here's the final version of our 2017 draft tiers, covering players with first-, second- and third-round grades (in parentheses next to each player's name). If you want to read our finalized reports for a player, click on the link tied to his name.

                *Underclassmen are noted with an asterisk.
                Tier 1

                The elite class of the 2017 NFL draft. These players should be starters from Day 1 and project as perennial Pro Bowl players.

                2017: 1 player | 2016: 0 players

                1. Myles Garrett, DE, Texas A&M* (Grade: 95)

                Garrett's production, tape and athletic upside put him on a different level compared to his peers. He's one of the elite pass-rushing prospects of the past decade and should be an easy choice for the Cleveland Browns with the No. 1 overall pick.


                Tier 2

                A notch below the elite class but still worthy of top-20 picks in most drafts. These picks are expected to be plug-and-play starters.

                2017: 10 players | 2016: 8 players

                2. Jamal Adams, S, LSU* (94)
                3. Solomon Thomas, DT, Stanford* (94)
                4. Leonard Fournette, RB, LSU* (93)
                5. Jonathan Allen, DT, Alabama (93)
                6. Marshon Lattimore, CB, Ohio State* (92)
                7. O.J. Howard, TE, Alabama (92)
                8. Malik Hooker, S, Ohio State* (92)
                9. Reuben Foster, ILB, Alabama (92)
                10. Christian McCaffrey, RB, Stanford* (92)
                11. Haason Reddick, ILB, Temple (92)

                Adams is a special player. He has the toughness to play near the line of scrimmage and the athleticism to cover wide receivers and tight ends in space. He's a more complete prospect than Hooker -- and he has a cleaner bill of health, with Hooker coming off multiple offseason surgeries. Howard is my highest-ranked tight end since I had Vernon Davis No. 6 overall in 2006. The Alabama product reminds me of Greg Olsen; they have very similar measurables, plus both bring value as big-play threats and blockers.

                Tier 3

                These players carry late first-round grades.

                2017: 13 players | 2016: 14 players

                12. Mike Williams, WR, Clemson* (91)
                13. Derek Barnett, DE, Tennessee* (91)
                14. David Njoku, TE, Miami (Fla.)* (91)
                15. Forrest Lamp, OG, Western Kentucky (90)
                16. Dalvin Cook, RB, Florida State* (90)
                17. Charles Harris, OLB, Missouri* (90)
                18. Gareon Conley, CB, Ohio State* (90)
                19. Corey Davis, WR, Western Michigan (90)
                20. Garett Bolles, OT, Utah* (90)
                21. John Ross, WR, Washington* (90)
                22. Cam Robinson, OT, Alabama* (90)
                23. Evan Engram, TE, Mississippi (90)
                24. Kevin King, CB, Washington (90)

                In the previous 10 drafts, my highest-rated offensive lineman was ranked, on average, fourth overall. The 2017 class is especially weak in that regard, with Lamp at No. 15 being the best O-lineman on my board. McCaffrey's rare versatility -- he can run between the tackles, catch passes in the slot and contribute as a return specialist -- helped bump him up to Tier 2, while Cook stock has been affected by character/durability concerns.

                Tier 4

                Would rather not reach for these prospects late in the first round, but they're good value picks in the first half of Round 2.

                2017: 22 players | 2016: 16 players

                25. Marlon Humphrey, CB, Alabama* (89)
                26. Takkarist McKinley, DE, UCLA (89)
                27. Tyus Bowser, OLB, Houston (89)
                28. Jarrad Davis, ILB, Florida (89)
                29. Mitchell Trubisky, QB, North Carolina* (89)
                30. Tre'Davious White, CB, LSU (89)
                31. Adoree' Jackson, CB, Southern California* (89)
                32. Deshaun Watson, QB, Clemson* (88)
                33. Quincy Wilson, CB, Florida* (88)
                34. Ryan Ramczyk, OT, Wisconsin* (88)
                35. Malik McDowell, DT, Michigan State* (88)
                36. Taco Charlton, DE, Michigan (87)
                37. Marcus Maye, S, Florida (87)
                38. T.J. Watt, OLB, Wisconsin* (87)
                39. Jourdan Lewis, CB, Michigan (87)
                40. Zay Jones, WR, East Carolina (87)
                41. Curtis Samuel, WR, Ohio State* (86)
                42. Budda Baker, S, Washington* (86)
                43. Josh Jones, S, NC State* (86)
                44. Joe Mixon, RB, Oklahoma* (85)
                45. Obi Melifonwu, S, Connecticut (85)
                46. Jabrill Peppers, S, Michigan* (85)

                That's right: The top-rated QB on my board (Trubisky) does not carry a first-round grade. Both he and Watson have the tools and mental makeup to eventually grow into good NFL starters, but neither are ready to start from Day 1. This tier is where the depth of the defensive back group starts to show: Fifteen of my top 46 players are cornerbacks or safeties. Good DBs will be available deep into Day 2.

                Tier 5

                These players are middle- or late-second-round prospects.

                2017: 15 players | 2016: 20 players

                47. Patrick Mahomes, QB, Texas Tech* (84)
                48. Chidobe Awuzie, CB, Colorado (83)
                49. Dion Dawkins, OG, Temple (83)
                50. DeShone Kizer, QB, Notre Dame* (83)
                51. JuJu Smith-Schuster, WR, Southern California* (83)
                52. Marcus Williams, S, Utah* (83)
                53. Zach Cunningham, ILB, Vanderbilt* (82)
                54. Alvin Kamara, RB, Tennessee* (82)
                55. Caleb Brantley, DT, Florida* (81)
                56. Jordan Willis, DE, Kansas State (81)
                57. Ryan Anderson, OLB, Alabama (81)
                58. Chris Wormley, DT, Michigan (80)
                59. Dan Feeney, OG, Indiana (80)
                60. Adam Shaheen, TE, Ashland* (80)
                61. Tim Williams, OLB, Alabama (80)

                It's looking like Mahomes will be a first-round pick, despite carrying a mid-second-round grade. That's quarterbacks for ya. Smith-Schuster is a bit of a forgotten man in this wide receiver class, but I love his competitiveness and he'd be a good fit in a West-coast system because of his ability to make plays after the catch. This is around the spot on the board where the second tier of TEs pop up. Shaheen leads that group, with the size/speed combination to cause matchup problems in the NFL.

                Tier 6

                These players are third-round prospects. They could develop into solid starters, but they either have limited upside or come with a higher element of risk than players worth drafting in the first two rounds.

                2017: 47 players | 2016: 46 players

                62. Taylor Moton, OT, Western Michigan (79)
                63. Gerald Everett, TE, South Alabama (79)
                64. DeMarcus Walker, DE, Florida State (79)
                65. Teez Tabor, CB, Florida* (79)
                66. Joshua Dobbs, QB, Tennessee (79)
                67. Cooper Kupp, WR, Eastern Washington (79)
                68. Larry Ogunjobi, DT, Charlotte (79)
                69. Sidney Jones, CB, Washington* (78)
                70. Duke Riley, ILB, LSU (78)
                71. Antonio Garcia, OT, Troy (78)
                72. Carlos Watkins, DT, Clemson (78)
                73. Dorian Johnson, OG, Pittsburgh (78)
                74. Jake Butt, TE, Michigan (78)
                75. Nathan Peterman, QB, Pittsburgh (77)
                76. Fabian Moreau, CB, UCLA (77)
                77. Derek Rivers, OLB, Youngstown (77)
                78. Samaje Perine, RB, Oklahoma* (77)
                79. Dalvin Tomlinson, DT, Alabama (77)
                80. Alex Anzalone, ILB, Florida* (77)
                81. Justin Evans, S, Texas A&M (77)
                82. Carlos Henderson, WR, Louisiana Tech* (77)
                83. Jaleel Johnson, DT, Iowa (76)
                84. Jordan Leggett, TE, Clemson (76)
                85. Ethan Pocic, OC, LSU (76)
                86. Desmond King, CB, Iowa (76)
                87. Carl Lawson, DE, Auburn* (76)
                88. Raekwon McMillan, ILB, Ohio State* (76)
                89. Taywan Taylor, WR, Western Kentucky (75)
                90. Kendell Beckwith, ILB, LSU (75)
                91. Bucky Hodges, TE, Virginia Tech* (75)
                92. Pat Elflein, OC, Ohio State (75)
                93. D'Onta Foreman, RB, Texas* (75)
                94. Montravius Adams, DT, Auburn (75)
                95. Damontae Kazee, CB, San Diego State (75)
                96. Ahkello Witherspoon, CB, Colorado (74)
                97. Daeshon Hall, DE, Texas A&M (74)
                98. Mack Hollins, WR, North Carolina (74)
                99. Tanoh Kpassagnon, DE, Villanova (73)
                100. ArDarius Stewart, WR, Alabama* (73)
                101. Chris Godwin, WR, Penn State* (72)
                102. Tarell Basham, DE, Ohio (72)
                103. Josh Malone, WR, Tennessee* (71)
                104. Rasul Douglas, CB, West Virginia (71)
                105. Davis Webb, QB, Cal (70)
                106. Malachi Dupre, WR, LSU* (70)
                107. Cam Sutton, CB, Tennessee (70)
                108. Zach Banner, OT, Southern California (70)

                Tabor's stock took a nosedive after the combine, where he ran a 4.62 40. No matter how clean your technique is, you need speed to play cornerback at a high level in the NFL, and Tabor's time falls in the red-flag territory. Jones was my No. 12 overall player before he tore his Achilles at Washington's pro day. Some team will get a steal on Day 2 if his recovery goes as planned. I love watching Hollins' tape: He's a very good blocker and shows the toughness to make contested catches over the middle. The only reason he's this low on my board is because he's coming off a collarbone injury.
                I don't think there's a love affair going on between the front office and Bill O'Brien, good chance of a mutual separation after 2017. -- Lance Zierlein and Jayson Braddock

                Comment


                • #23
                  Kiper one-ups ToddToddTodd with 750+ rankings...



                  Kiper's final 2017 draft position rankings: More than 750 prospects
                  ​​
                  Below you will find my top prospects at every position for the 2017 NFL draft. The number of players below far surpasses the total number of players who will be drafted; there are only 253 picks, but I have more than 750 prospects ranked.

                  What I have done, however, is list every player I can see as either being drafted or making a roster or practice squad. It's important to remember that only a sliver of players on NFL rosters were drafted, and undrafted players take up a significant chunk of 53-man squads.

                  Reminder: Not all prospects will end up at the positions in which they are listed here. Some defensive ends will end up listed at outside linebacker, some tackles will become guards, and so on. With that in mind, check out my full rankings below.

                  Quarterbacks


                  1. Mitchell Trubisky, North Carolina
                  2. Patrick Mahomes, Texas Tech
                  3. Deshaun Watson, Clemson
                  4. Nathan Peterman, Pitt
                  5. DeShone Kizer, Notre Dame
                  6. Joshua Dobbs, Tennessee
                  7. Brad Kaaya, Miami (Fla)
                  8. Davis Webb, California
                  9. Alek Torgersen, Penn
                  10. C.J. Beathard, Iowa
                  11. Chad Kelly, Mississippi
                  12. Jerod Evans, Virginia Tech
                  13. Seth Russell, Baylor
                  14. Cooper Rush, Central Michigan
                  15. Wes Lunt, Illinois
                  16. Zach Terrell, Western Michigan
                  17. Philip Nelson, East Carolina
                  18. Antonio Pipkin, Tiffin
                  19. Sefo Liufau, Colorado
                  20. Trevor Knight, Texas A&M
                  21. Mitch Leidner, Minnesota
                  22. Tommy Armstrong, Nebraska
                  23. Brady Gustafson, Montana
                  24. Nick Mullens, So. Mississippi
                  25. Skyler Howard, West Virginia
                  26. Taysom Hill, BYU
                  27. Garrett Fugate, Central Missouri
                  28. Patrick Towles, Boston College
                  29. Gunner Kiel, Cincinnati
                  30. Austin Appleby, Florida
                  31. Eli Jenkins, Jacksonville State
                  32. Nick Schuessler, Clemson
                  33. Bart Houston, Wisconsin
                  34. Greyson Lambert, Georgia
                  35. Sean Maguire, Florida State
                  36. Mike White, Western Kentucky
                  37. Aaron Bailey, No. Iowa
                  38. Tyler O'Connor, Michigan State
                  39. Dakota Prukop, Oregon
                  40. Dan Collins, Maine
                  41. Jack Nelson, Winona State



                  Running backs


                  1. Christian McCaffrey, Stanford
                  2. Leonard Fournette, LSU
                  3. Dalvin Cook, Florida State
                  4. Joe Mixon, Oklahoma
                  5. D'Onta Foreman, Texas
                  6. Kareem Hunt, Toledo
                  7. Samaje Perine, Oklahoma
                  8. Alvin Kamara, Tennessee
                  9. Jeremy McNichols, Boise State
                  10. James Conner, Pitt
                  11. T.J. Logan, North Carolina
                  12. Tarik Cohen, NC A&T
                  13. Wayne Gallman, Clemson
                  14. Aaron Jones, UTEP
                  15. Marlon Mack, South Florida
                  16. Brian Hill, Wyoming
                  17. Matthew Dayes, NC State
                  18. Jamaal Williams, BYU
                  19. Donnel Pumphrey, San Diego State
                  20. Corey Clement, Wisconsin
                  21. Stanley "Boom" Williams, Kentucky
                  22. Joe Williams, Utah
                  23. De'Angelo Henderson, Coastal Carolina
                  24. Elijah McGuire, Louisiana-Lafayette
                  25. Taquan "Smoke" Mizzell, Virginia
                  26. Elijah Hood, North Carolina
                  27. Matt Breida, Georgia Southern
                  28. Devine Redding, Indiana
                  29. Leshun Daniels, Iowa
                  30. Khalfani Muhammad, California
                  31. De'Veon Smith, Michigan
                  32. Chris Carson, Oklahoma State
                  33. Dontre Wilson, Ohio State
                  34. Justin Davis, USC
                  35. I'Tavius Mathers, Middle Tennessee State
                  36. Jahad Thomas, Temple
                  37. Joseph Yearby, Miami (Fla.)
                  38. Shock Linwood, Baylor
                  39. Tarean Folston, Notre Dame
                  40. Dare Ogunbowale, Wisconsin
                  41. Jordan Johnson, Buffalo
                  42. Marcus Cox, Appalachian State
                  43. Khalid Abdullah, James Madison
                  44. Brandon Radcliff, Louisville
                  45. Terrell Newby, Nebraska
                  46. Teriyon Gipson, New Mexico
                  47. Kalif Phillips, Charlotte
                  48. Rushel Shell, West Virginia
                  49. Leon Allen, Western Kentucky
                  50. Jovon Robinson, Auburn
                  51. James Summers, East Carolina
                  52. James Flanders, Tulsa
                  53. Wes Brown, Maryland
                  54. Joel Bouagnon, Northern Illinois
                  55. King Frazier, North Dakota State
                  56. De'Shawn Jones, Campbell
                  57. Keith Ford, Texas A&M
                  58. Darius Victor, Towson
                  59. William Stanback, Virginia Union
                  60. JoJo Kemp, Kentucky
                  61. Barry Sanders, Oklahoma State
                  62. Trey Edmunds, Maryland
                  63. Paul Harris, Hawaii
                  64. Anthony Wales, Western Kentucky
                  65. Tyler Rouse, Boston College
                  66. Rennie Childs, Oklahoma State
                  67. Charles Jones, Kansas State

                  Fullbacks/H-backs


                  1. George Kittle, Iowa
                  2. Freddie Stevenson, Florida State
                  3. Taylor McNamara, USC
                  4. Sam Rogers, Virginia Tech
                  5. Tyler McCloskey, Houston
                  6. Cody Heiman, Washburn
                  7. Marquez Williams, Miami (Fla.)
                  8. Shane Smith, San Jose State
                  9. Nate Iese, UCLA
                  10. Anthony Firkser, Harvard
                  11. Joe Bacci, Central Michigan
                  12. Emmanuel Holder, Towson
                  13. Algernon Brown, BYU
                  14. Prescott Line, Michigan State
                  15. Jaymar Parrish, Pitt
                  16. Kenneth Goins Jr., Maryland
                  17. Bobby Wolford, Boston College
                  18. Brendan Douglas, Georgia
                  19. Marcus Allen, Georgia Tech
                  20. Dakota Ball, Alabama
                  21. Shawn White, Navy

                  Wide receivers


                  1. Mike Williams, Clemson
                  2. Corey Davis, Western Michigan
                  3. John Ross, Washington
                  4. Zay Jones, East Carolina
                  5. JuJu Smith-Schuster, USC
                  6. Curtis Samuel, Ohio State
                  7. Chris Godwin, Penn State
                  8. Josh Malone, Tennessee
                  9. Cooper Kupp, Eastern Washington
                  10. ArDarius Stewart, Alabama
                  11. Amara Darboh, Michigan
                  12. Carlos Henderson, Louisiana Tech
                  13. Taywan Taylor, Western Kentucky
                  14. Mack Hollins, North Carolina
                  15. Isaiah McKenzie, Georgia
                  16. Chad Hansen, California
                  17. Malachi Dupre, LSU
                  18. Isaiah Ford, Virginia Tech
                  19. KD Cannon, Baylor
                  20. Stacy Coley, Miami (Fla.)
                  21. Josh Reynolds, Texas A&M
                  22. Jerome Lane, Akron
                  23. Dede Westbrook, Oklahoma
                  24. Shelton Gibson, West Virginia
                  25. Noah Brown, Ohio State
                  26. Chad Williams, Grambling
                  27. Jehu Chesson, Michigan
                  28. Michael Rector, Stanford
                  29. Travis Rudolph, Florida State
                  30. Damore'ea Stringfellow, Mississippi
                  31. Robert Davis, Georgia State
                  32. Tanner Gentry, Wyoming
                  33. Artavis Scott, Clemson
                  34. Speedy Noil, Texas A&M
                  35. Kenny Golladay, Northern Illinois
                  36. Greg Ward, Houston
                  37. Jalen Robinette, Air Force
                  38. Amba Etta-Tawo, Syracuse
                  39. Noel Thomas, Connecticut
                  40. Fred Ross, Mississippi State
                  41. Derrick Griffin, Texas Southern
                  42. Michael Clark, Marshall
                  43. Darreus Rogers, USC
                  44. James Quick, Louisville
                  45. Ryan Switzer, North Carolina
                  46. Travin Dural, LSU
                  47. Bug Howard, North Carolina
                  48. Zach Pascal, Old Dominion
                  49. Ricky Seals-Jones, Texas A&M
                  50. Thomas Sperbeck, Boise State
                  51. Bobo Wilson, Florida State
                  52. Gabe Marks, Washington State
                  53. Trent Taylor, Louisiana Tech
                  54. Kermit Whitfield, Florida State
                  55. River Cracraft, Washington State
                  56. Tim Patrick, Utah
                  57. Rodney Adams, South Florida
                  58. Gehrig Dieter, Alabama
                  59. Jamari Staples, Louisville
                  60. Domo Tayler, James Madison
                  61. Quincy Adeboyejo, Mississippi
                  62. Drew Morgan, Arkansas
                  63. Robert Wheelwright, Wisconsin
                  64. Austin Carr, Northwestern
                  65. Drew Wolitarsky, Minnesota
                  66. DeAngelo Yancey, Purdue
                  67. Tim White, Arizona State
                  68. Brisly Estime, Syracuse
                  69. Chance Allen, Houston
                  70. Keevan Lucas, Tulsa
                  71. Deon-Tay McManus, Marshall
                  72. Nicholas Norris, Western Kentucky
                  73. Domonique Young, Purdue
                  74. Jordan Westerkamp, Nebraska
                  75. Daikiel Shorts, West Virginia
                  76. Josh Atkinson, Tulsa
                  77. Monty Madaris, Michigan State
                  78. Jordan Reid, Ohio
                  79. Trey Griffey, Arizona
                  80. Willie Quinn, Southern
                  81. RJ Shelton, Michigan State
                  82. Victor Bolden, Oregon State
                  83. Ishmael Zamora, Baylor
                  84. Devin Lauderdale, Texas Tech
                  85. Brandon Reilly, Nebraska
                  86. Jimmy Williams, East Carolina
                  87. Keeon Johnson, Virginia
                  88. Lance Lenoir, Western Illinois
                  89. Dwayne Stanford, Oregon
                  90. Ishmael Adams, UCLA
                  91. JoJo Natson, Akron
                  92. Keon Hatcher, Arkansas
                  93. Jamir Tillman, Navy
                  94. Darrius Sims, Vanderbilt
                  95. Brian Brown, Richmond
                  96. Aaron Peck, Fresno State
                  97. Janarion Grant, Rutgers
                  98. Marcus Davis, Auburn
                  99. Edward Pope, Texas A&M
                  100. Alonzo Moore, Nebraska
                  101. Aregeros Turner, No. Illinois
                  102. Dominique Reed, Arkansas
                  103. Marcus Kemp, Hawaii
                  104. Devin Borders, Eastern Kentucky
                  105. Devin Wilson, Virginia Tech
                  106. Mitchell Paige, Indiana
                  107. Corey Jones, Toledo
                  108. Robert Ruiz, Colorado State

                  Tight ends


                  1. O.J. Howard, Alabama
                  2. Evan Engram, Mississippi
                  3. David Njoku, Miami (Fla.)
                  4. Adam Shaheen, Ashland
                  5. Jake Butt, Michigan
                  6. Cole Hikutini, Louisville
                  7. Jordan Leggett, Clemson
                  8. Gerald Everett, South Alabama
                  9. Bucky Hodges, Virginia Tech
                  10. Eric Saubert, Drake
                  11. Jonnu Smith, Florida International
                  12. Jeremy Sprinkle, Arkansas
                  13. Michael Roberts, Toledo
                  14. Darrell Daniels, Washington
                  15. Pharaoh Brown, Oregon
                  16. Blake Jarwin, Oklahoma State
                  17. Wyatt Houston, Utah State
                  18. Jacob Hollister, Wyoming
                  19. Cethan Carter, Nebraska
                  20. Billy Brown, Shepherd
                  21. Colin Jeter, LSU
                  22. Sean Irwin, Colorado
                  23. Phazahn Odom, Fordham
                  24. Josiah Price, Michigan State
                  25. Anthony Auclair, Laval (Canada)
                  26. Emanuel Byrd, Marshall
                  27. Keith Towbridge, Louisville
                  28. Tyrone Swoopes, Texas
                  29. Evan Moeai, Utah
                  30. Barrett Burns, Appalachian State
                  31. Jason Croom, Tennessee
                  32. Scott Orndoff, Pitt
                  33. Caleb Smith, Oregon State
                  34. Sam Cotton, Nebraska
                  35. Sean Culkin, Missouri
                  36. Evan Baylis, Oregon
                  37. Billy Freeman, San Jose State
                  38. Jamal Lyles, Michigan State
                  39. Standish Dobard, Miami (Fla.)
                  40. Duncan Fletcher, Furman
                  41. Keith Rucker, Georgia State
                  42. Colin Thompson, Temple
                  43. Hayden Plinke, UTEP
                  44. Johnny Mundt, Oregon
                  45. Erich Schneider, Duke
                  46. Steve Wroblewski, So. Utah
                  47. Caleb Bluiett, Texas
                  48. Mason Schreck, Buffalo
                  49. Kody Kohl, Arizona State
                  50. Steve Donatell, Western Kentucky

                  Offensive tackles


                  1. Cam Robinson, Alabama
                  2. Ryan Ramczyk, Wisconsin
                  3. Garett Bolles, Utah
                  4. Taylor Moton, Western Michigan
                  5. Antonio Garcia, Troy
                  6. Aviante Collins, TCU
                  7. Will Holden, Vanderbilt
                  8. Adam Bisnowaty, Pitt
                  9. Roderick Johnson, Florida State
                  10. David Sharpe, Florida
                  11. Julie'n Davenport, Bucknell
                  12. Erik Magnuson, Michigan
                  13. Conor McDermott, UCLA
                  14. Jylan Ware, Alabama State
                  15. Chad Wheeler, USC
                  16. Daniel Brunskill, San Diego State
                  17. Eric Smith, Virginia
                  18. Andreas Knappe, Connecticut
                  19. Jeromy Irwin, Colorado
                  20. Cole Croston, Iowa
                  21. Dan Skipper, Arkansas
                  22. Sam Tevi, Utah
                  23. Robert Leff, Auburn
                  24. Avery Gennesy, Texas A&M
                  25. Jonah Pirsig, Minnesota
                  26. Storm Norton, Toledo
                  27. Jon Heck, North Carolina
                  28. Clint Van Horn, Marshall
                  29. Max Rich, Harvard
                  30. Mason Zandi, South Carolina
                  31. Korren Kirven, Alabama
                  32. Javarius Leamon, South Carolina State
                  33. Justin Senior, Mississippi State
                  34. Kent Perkins, Texas
                  35. Kodi Kieler, Michigan State
                  36. Connor Bozick, Delaware
                  37. Dimitric Camiel, Indiana
                  38. Victor Salako, Oklahoma State
                  39. Jerry Ugokwe, William & Mary
                  40. Mitchell Kirsch, James Madison
                  41. Levon Myers, Northern Illinois
                  42. JJ Denman, Rutgers
                  43. Paris Palmer, Penn State
                  44. Brad Wilcox, BYU
                  45. Steven Moore, California
                  46. Darrell Williams, Western Kentucky
                  47. Eric Olson, Northwestern
                  48. Cameron Cermin, Purdue
                  49. Elijah Wilkinson, UMass
                  50. Tyler Lassiter, Troy
                  51. Dustin Stanton, Oregon State
                  52. Collin Buchanan, Miami (Ohio)
                  53. Andrew Wylie, Eastern Michigan
                  54. Troy Watson, Ohio
                  55. Kwayde Miller, San Diego State
                  56. Jake Simonich, Utah State
                  57. Kelly Parfitt, Florida Atlantic

                  Offensive guards


                  1. Forrest Lamp, Western Kentucky
                  2. Dion Dawkins, Temple
                  3. Dan Feeney, Indiana
                  4. Jermaine Eluemunor, Texas A&M
                  5. Dorian Johnson, Pitt
                  6. Jessamen Dunker, Tennessee State
                  7. Zach Banner, USC
                  8. Danny Isidora, Miami (Fla.)
                  9. Nico Siragusa, San Diego State
                  10. Jordan Morgan, Kutztown
                  11. Ben Braden, Michigan
                  12. Damien Mama, USC
                  13. Isaac Asiata, Utah
                  14. Nate Theaker, Wayne State (Michigan)
                  15. Mario Yakoo, Boise State
                  16. Kyle Kalis, Michigan
                  17. Greg Pyke, Georgia
                  18. Fred Zerblis, Colorado State
                  19. Caleb Peterson, North Carolina
                  20. Freddie Tagaloa, Arizona
                  21. Josh Boutte, LSU
                  22. Ethan Cooper, Indiana (Penn.)
                  23. Ryan Leahy, Cincinnati
                  24. Jordan Roos, Purdue
                  25. Richard Levy, Connecticut
                  26. Tanner Stone, Duke
                  27. Sean Harlow, Oregon State
                  28. Chris Borrayo, California
                  29. Corey Levin, UT-Chattanooga
                  30. Adam Pankey, West Virginia
                  31. Alex Kozan, Auburn
                  32. Kareem Are, Florida State
                  33. Steven Baggett, Boise State
                  34. Eric Austell, Charleston Southern
                  35. Khalil Hunter, Louisville
                  36. Devon Desper, Mississippi State
                  37. Jake Eldrenkamp, Washington
                  38. Cameron Lee, Illinois State
                  39. Alphonse Taylor, Alabama
                  40. Gavin Andrews, Oregon State
                  41. Nick Callender, Colorado State
                  42. Larson Graham, Duquesne
                  43. Benny McGowan, Michigan State
                  44. Corey Whitaker, Nebraska
                  45. Chris Muller, Rutgers
                  46. Michael Selby, Marshall
                  47. Shane Brostek, Washington
                  48. Cameron Hunt, Oregon
                  49. Travis Averill, Boise State
                  50. Parker Collins, Appalachian State
                  51. Bret Treadway, Lamar
                  52. Anton Warby, Wofford

                  Centers


                  1. Pat Elflein, Ohio State
                  2. Ethan Pocic, LSU
                  3. Tyler Orlosky, West Virginia
                  4. Kyle Fuller, Baylor
                  5. J.J. Dielman, Utah
                  6. Jon Toth, Kentucky
                  7. Cameron Tom, So. Mississippi
                  8. Chase Roullier, Wyoming
                  9. Jay Guillermo, Clemson
                  10. Lucas Crowley, North Carolina
                  11. Riley Sorenson, Washington State
                  12. Deyshawn Bond, Cincinnati
                  13. Brian Gaia, Penn State
                  14. Johnny Caspers, Stanford
                  15. Dylan Utter, Nebraska
                  16. Brandon Kublanow, Georgia
                  17. Jamaal Clayborn, Mississippi State
                  18. Stephon McCray, Arizona State
                  19. Freddie Burden, Georgia Tech
                  20. Dylan Wiesman, Tennessee

                  Defensive ends


                  1. Myles Garrett, Texas A&M
                  2. Jonathan Allen, Alabama
                  3. Solomon Thomas, Stanford
                  4. Charles Harris, Missouri
                  5. Derek Barnett, Tennessee
                  6. DeMarcus Walker, Florida State
                  7. Taco Charlton, Michigan
                  8. Carl Lawson, Auburn
                  9. Jordan Willis, Kansas State
                  10. Tarell Basham, Ohio
                  11. Trey Hendrickson, Florida Atlantic
                  12. Dawuane Smoot, Illinois
                  13. Tanoh Kpassagnon, Villanova
                  14. Daeshon Hall, Texas A&M
                  15. Keionta Davis, UT-Chattanooga
                  16. Isaac Rochell, Notre Dame
                  17. Ifeadi Odenigbo, Northwestern
                  18. Deatrich Wise, Arkansas
                  19. Fadol Brown, Mississippi
                  20. Garrett Sickels, Penn State
                  21. Corey Vereen, Tennessee
                  22. Bryan Cox, Florida
                  23. A.J. Jefferson, Mississippi State
                  24. Drew Bailey, Louisville
                  25. Hunter Dimick, Utah
                  26. Keion Adams, Western Michigan
                  27. Sam McCaskill, Boise State
                  28. Praise Martin-Oguike, Temple
                  29. Darius English, South Carolina
                  30. Ken Ekanem, Virginia Tech
                  31. Avery Moss, Youngstown State
                  32. Al-Quadin Muhammad, Miami (Fla.)
                  33. Pat O'Connor, Eastern Michigan
                  34. Jamal Marcus, Akron
                  35. Lewis Neal, LSU
                  36. Cameron Malveaux, Houston
                  37. Terence Waugh, Kent State
                  38. James McFarland, TCU
                  39. Julian Pinnix-Odrick, Rutgers
                  40. Dylan Bradley, So. Mississippi
                  41. Alex Barrett, San Diego State
                  42. Noble Nwachukwu, West Virginia
                  43. John Stepec, Toledo
                  44. Khari Waithe-Alexander, So. Illinois
                  45. Isaiah Irving, San Jose State

                  Defensive tackles


                  1. Chris Wormley, Michigan
                  2. Malik McDowell, Michigan State
                  3. Carlos Watkins, Clemson
                  4. Jaleel Johnson, Iowa
                  5. Caleb Brantley, Florida
                  6. Montravius Adams, Auburn
                  7. Larry Ogunjobi, Charlotte
                  8. Dalvin Tomlinson, Alabama
                  9. Elijah Qualls, Washington
                  10. Davon Godchaux, LSU
                  11. Vincent Taylor, Oklahoma State
                  12. Ryan Glasgow, Michigan
                  13. D.J. Jones, Mississippi
                  14. Eddie Vanderdoes, UCLA
                  15. Nazair Jones, North Carolina
                  16. Charles Walker, Oklahoma
                  17. Jarron Jones, Notre Dame
                  18. Grover Stewart, Albany State
                  19. DeAngelo Brown, Louisville
                  20. Stevie Tu'ikolovatu, USC
                  21. Treyvon Hester, Toledo
                  22. Tanzel Smart, Tulane
                  23. Adam Butler, Vanderbilt
                  24. Collin Bevins, NW Missouri State
                  25. Kevin Maurice, Nebraska
                  26. Travis Tuiloma, BYU
                  27. Jeremiah Ledbetter, Arkansas
                  28. Josh Tupou, Colorado
                  29. Desmond Tucker, Iowa State
                  30. Darius Hamilton, Rutgers
                  31. Viliami Latu, Arizona State
                  32. A.J. Wolf, Duke
                  33. Jeremy Faulk, Garden City CC (Kansas)
                  34. Aaron Curry, TCU
                  35. Paul Boyette, Texas
                  36. Darrien Howard, West Virginia
                  37. Tyrique Jarrett, Pitt
                  38. Tueni Lupeamanu, Idaho
                  39. Isaiah Golden, McNeese State
                  40. Harold Brantley, NW Missouri State
                  41. Logan Taele, BYU
                  42. Kennedy Tulimasealii, Hawaii
                  43. Glen Antoine, Idaho
                  44. Jon Taylor, SE Louisiana
                  45. Kory Rasmussen, Hawaii
                  46. Isaac Gross, Mississippi
                  47. Johnathan Calvin, Mississippi State
                  48. Josh Augusta, Missouri
                  49. Nigel Williams, Virginia Tech

                  Inside linebackers


                  1. Reuben Foster, Alabama
                  2. Jarrad Davis, Florida
                  3. Zach Cunningham, Vanderbilt
                  4. Raekwon McMillan, Ohio State
                  5. Kendell Beckwith, LSU
                  6. Ben Gedeon, Michigan
                  7. Anthony Walker, Northwestern
                  8. Blair Brown, Ohio
                  9. Jayon Brown, UCLA
                  10. Harvey Langi, BYU
                  11. Ben Boulware, Clemson
                  12. Marquel Lee, Wake Forest
                  13. Jordan Herdman, Simon Fraser
                  14. Richie Brown, Mississippi State
                  15. Connor Harris, Lindenwood
                  16. Keith Kelsey, Louisville
                  17. Christian Tago, San Jose State
                  18. Jordan Evans, Oklahoma
                  19. Hardy Nickerson, Illinois
                  20. Riley Bullough, Michigan State
                  21. Andrew King, Army
                  22. Tim Kimbrough, Georgia
                  23. Kevin Davis, Colorado State
                  24. Brooks Ellis, Arkansas
                  25. Antonio Kinard, Cincinnati
                  26. T.J. Hollomon, South Carolina
                  27. Keith Brown, Western Kentucky
                  28. P.J. Davis, Georgia Tech
                  29. Austin Calito, Villanova
                  30. Michael Scherer, Missouri
                  31. Nyeem Wartman-White, Penn State
                  32. Josh Banderas, Nebraska
                  33. T.J. Neal, Auburn
                  34. Claude George, Texas A&M
                  35. John Law, Appalachian State
                  36. Kane Seeley, Iowa State
                  37. Matt Galambos, Pitt
                  38. Randy Ricks, San Diego State

                  Outside linebackers


                  1. Haason Reddick, Temple
                  2. Takkarist McKinley, UCLA
                  3. Tyus Bowser, Houston
                  4. Duke Riley, LSU
                  5. T.J. Watt, Wisconsin
                  6. Tim Williams, Alabama
                  7. Ryan Anderson, Alabama
                  8. Alex Anzalone, Florida
                  9. Derek Rivers, Youngstown State
                  10. Vince Biegel, Wisconsin
                  11. Jalen Reeves-Maybin, Tennessee
                  12. Jojo Mathis, Washington
                  13. Ejuan Price, Pitt
                  14. Devonte Fields, Louisville
                  15. Josh Carraway, TCU
                  16. Carroll Phillips, Illinois
                  17. Tashawn Bower, LSU
                  18. Marcus Oliver, Indiana
                  19. Markuss Eligwe, Georgia Southern
                  20. Steven Taylor, Houston
                  21. James Onwualu, Notre Dame
                  22. Elijah Lee, Kansas State
                  23. Calvin Munson, San Diego State
                  24. Matt Milano, Boston College
                  25. Jimmie Gilbert, Colorado
                  26. Dylan Donahue, West Georgia
                  27. Psalm Wooching, Washington
                  28. Shaan Washington, Texas A&M
                  29. Deon Hollins, UCLA
                  30. Brandon Bell, Penn State
                  31. Dylan Cole, Missouri State
                  32. Tanner Vallejo, Boise State
                  33. Pita Taumoepenu, Utah
                  34. Charmeachealle Moore, Kansas State
                  35. Jordan Burton, Oklahoma State
                  36. Samson Ebukam, Eastern Washington
                  37. Salamo Fiso, Arizona State
                  38. Nathan Ricketts, Central Michigan
                  39. Tau Lotulelei, UNLV
                  40. Daniel McMillian, Florida
                  41. Michael Rose-Ivey, Nebraska
                  42. Torrodney Prevot, Oregon
                  43. Ed Davis, Michigan State
                  44. Josiah Powell, Navy
                  45. Kennan Gilchrist, Appalachian State
                  46. Eric Wilson, Cincinnati
                  47. Nigel Harris, South Florida
                  48. Stephaun Marshall, Temple
                  49. Joshua Posley, Ball State
                  50. Zach Bradshaw, Virginia
                  51. Gary Thompson, Marshall
                  52. Ryan Watson, Air Force
                  53. Lucas Wacha, Wyoming
                  54. Jeremy Timpf, Army

                  Cornerbacks


                  1. Marshon Lattimore, Ohio State
                  2. Marlon Humphrey, Alabama
                  3. Gareon Conley, Ohio State
                  4. Kevin King, Washington
                  5. Adoree' Jackson, USC
                  6. Tre'Davious White, LSU
                  7. Jourdan Lewis, Michigan
                  8. Sidney Jones, Washington
                  9. Chidobe Awuzie, Colorado
                  10. Fabian Moreau, UCLA
                  11. Ahkello Witherspoon, Colorado
                  12. Desmond King, Iowa
                  13. Quincy Wilson, Florida
                  14. Rasul Douglas, West Virginia
                  15. Brendan Langley, Lamar
                  16. Damontae Kazee, San Diego State
                  17. Teez Tabor, Florida
                  18. Cameron Sutton, Tennessee
                  19. Nate Hairston, Temple
                  20. Howard Wilson, Houston
                  21. Ashton Lampkin, Oklahoma State
                  22. Brian Allen, Utah
                  23. Shaquill Griffin, Central Florida
                  24. Cordrea Tankersley, Clemson
                  25. Jalen Myrick, Minnesota
                  26. Dwayne Thomas, LSU
                  27. Ezra Robinson, Tennessee State
                  28. Brad Watson, Wake Forest
                  29. Corn Elder, Miami (Fla.)
                  30. Arthur Maulet, Memphis
                  31. Jeremy Cutrer, M. Tennessee State
                  32. Aarion Penton, Missouri
                  33. Will Likely, Maryland
                  34. Channing Stribling, Michigan
                  35. Marquez White, Florida State
                  36. Des Lawrence, North Carolina
                  37. Breon Borders, Duke
                  38. Jhavon Williams, Connecticut
                  39. Treston DeCoud, Oregon State
                  40. Jhavon Williams, Connecticut
                  41. Sojourn Shelton, Wisconsin
                  42. Ryan Lewis, Pitt
                  43. Cole Luke, Notre Dame
                  44. Titus Howard, Slippery Rock
                  45. Tony Bridges, Mississippi
                  46. Justin Thomas, Georgia Tech
                  47. Joshua Holsey, Auburn
                  48. Antonio Crawford, West Virginia
                  49. Jomal Wiltz, Iowa State
                  50. Jeremy Clark, Michigan
                  51. Jayshawn Jordan, Idaho
                  52. Torren McGaster, Vanderbilt
                  53. Jared Collins, Arkansas
                  54. Jack Tocho, NC State
                  55. John Gibson, Missouri
                  56. Jalen Rogers, Hawaii
                  57. DaQuan Pace, Eastern Michigan
                  58. Terrence Singleton, Prairie View
                  59. Josh Thornton, So. Utah
                  60. Ryan Reid, Baylor
                  61. Raheem Wilson, SE Oklahoma
                  62. Dominique Hatfield, Utah
                  63. Tion Wright, Baylor
                  64. Justis Nelson, Texas Tech
                  65. Tyquwan Glass, Fresno State
                  66. Michael Davis, BYU
                  67. DaShaun Amos, East Carolina

                  Safeties


                  1. Jamal Adams, LSU
                  2. Malik Hooker, Ohio State
                  3. Jabrill Peppers, Michigan
                  4. Budda Baker, Washington
                  5. Josh Jones, NC State
                  6. Marcus Maye, Florida
                  7. Marcus Williams, Utah
                  8. Obi Melifonwu, Connecticut
                  9. Justin Evans, Texas A&M
                  10. John Johnson, Boston College
                  11. Rudy Ford, Auburn
                  12. Eddie Jackson, Alabama
                  13. Lorenzo Jerome, State Francis (Penn.)
                  14. Rayshawn Jenkins, Miami (Fla.)
                  15. Montae Nicholson, Michigan State
                  16. Nate Gerry, Nebraska
                  17. Jordan Sterns, Oklahoma State
                  18. Josh Harvey-Clemons, Louisville
                  19. Tedric Thompson, Colorado
                  20. Delano Hill, Michigan
                  21. Xavier Woods, Louisiana Tech
                  22. Jermaine Grace, Miami (Fla.)
                  23. Nate Andrews, Florida State
                  24. Mike Tyson, Cincinnati
                  25. Ahmad Thomas, Oklahoma
                  26. Orion Stewart, Baylor
                  27. Max Redfield, Notre Dame
                  28. Branden Leston, Western Kentucky
                  29. Shalom Luani, Washington State
                  30. Jordan Moore, Texas-San Antonio
                  31. Damarius Travis, Minnesota
                  32. Zach Edwards, Cincinnati
                  33. Maurice Smith, Georgia
                  34. Weston Steelhammer, Air Force
                  35. Jadar Johnson, Clemson
                  36. Brandon Wilson, Houston
                  37. Denzel Johnson, TCU
                  38. Dymonte Thomas, Michigan
                  39. Tony Conner, Mississippi
                  40. David Jones, Richmond
                  41. Fish Smithson, Kansas
                  42. DeJuan Rogers, Toledo
                  43. Rickey Jefferson, LSU
                  44. Tony Annese, Central Michigan
                  45. Quincy Mauger, Georgia
                  46. Demetrious Cox, Michigan State
                  47. Leo Musso, Wisconsin
                  48. Randall Goforth, UCLA
                  49. Taylor Barton, Illinois
                  50. Dallas Lloyd, Stanford
                  51. Ryan Janvion, Wake Forest
                  52. Reggie Daniels, Oregon
                  53. Dante Barnett, Kansas State
                  54. Devin Chappell, Oregon State
                  55. Zach Hoffpauir, Stanford
                  56. Kai Nacua, BYU
                  57. Chuck Clark, Virginia Tech
                  58. Dylan Haines, Texas
                  59. Jamal Carter, Miami (Fla.)
                  60. Aaron Peak, Butler CC (Kansas)
                  61. Nate Holley, Kent State
                  62. Alex Gray, Appalachian State
                  63. Casey DeAndrade, New Hampshire
                  64. Dravious Wright, NC State
                  65. Donald Payne, Stetson

                  Kickers


                  1. Zane Gonzalez, Arizona State
                  2. Jake Elliott, Memphis
                  3. Younghoe Koo, Georgia Southern
                  4. Harrison Butker, Georgia Tech
                  5. Adam Griffith, Alabama
                  6. Matt Davis, UNC (Pembroke)
                  7. Cole Netten, Iowa State
                  8. Conrad Ukropina, Stanford
                  9. Nick Weiler, North Carolina
                  10. Miles Bergner, South Dakota

                  Punters


                  1. Austin Rehkow, Idaho
                  2. Justin Vogel, Miami (Fla.)
                  3. Toby Baker, Arkansas
                  4. Hayden Hunt, Colorado State
                  5. Eric Keena, North Texas
                  6. Nicholas Conte, Virginia
                  7. Cameron Johnston, Ohio State
                  8. Kenny Allen, Michigan
                  9. Rigoberto Sanchez, Hawaii
                  10. Dalton Schomp, Florida Atlantic
                  11. Sean Wale, Boise State
                  12. Matt Haack, Arizona State
                  13. Jake Ryder, Towson

                  Long snappers


                  1. Colin Holba, Louisville
                  2. Cole Mazza, Alabama
                  3. Bradley Northnagel, California
                  4. Josh Appel, Indiana State
                  5. Scott Daly, Notre Dame
                  6. Nolan Dowling, Western Kentucky
                  7. Chase Dominguez, Utah
                  8. Drew Williams, South Carolina
                  I don't think there's a love affair going on between the front office and Bill O'Brien, good chance of a mutual separation after 2017. -- Lance Zierlein and Jayson Braddock

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