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  • #31
    Originally posted by H2O4me View Post

    So sorry to hear you're having to go through that, JK. It must truly suck.

    It definitely makes you appreciate what you work so hard for. But I am going to stay positive and be strong,

    I imagine there will be monies allocated to the uninsured at some level, because of this...
    Nicole Friedman‏ @NicoleFriedman
    It's a tough time for our city/surroundings.
    Hopefully 70% of us aren't left high and dry.

    Comment


    • #32
      Originally posted by Yosarian View Post

      San Antonio is dry as a bone.
      Cool. Now I really have to go home. Thanks for the update. By the way, how are you in your place and where are you around here in Texas?

      Comment


      • #33
        Originally posted by Mae_Anne12 View Post

        Cool. Now I really have to go home. Thanks for the update. By the way, how are you in your place and where are you around here in Texas?
        Harvey blew my power line down. Just got power on a few hours ago. No water damage inside house and we are ok. Didn't lose any cars either. For me ....nothing compared to Ike. I guess we were spared this time.

        Feeling for everyone in the flood zones. Been there..it is very traumatic and just bad. When I was feeling over whelmed during clean up after Ike this helped me through. Just do a little every day. One thing at a time. Don't look at the big picture. Do what you can and people will help you get it all done!!!! I am 9 years removed from Ike and still not living in my house. I learned a lot from Ike though. I took half a day off last Friday and started putting everything I own 5 feet in the air which continued Saturday and Sunday. Had a plan for the cars. And was ready for the worst with generator and gas and food and supplies. Generator ran 33 hours this time. Didn't have one during Ike. I learned I need a bigger generator this time. Wouldn't run the ac but at least we had a fan and our fridge running.
        Originally posted by jkeener71 View Post

        Hopefully 70% of us aren't left high and dry.
        Don't hold your breath for FEMA keener. They will give you something. My house had 4 feet of water damage plus the whole roof and lost 4 cars and every appliance I had and fema gave us 1200 dollars to make things right. Wasn't very helpful. If I had an extra fridge I would offer it up but we gave the little one we had to our granddaughter. Maybe someone on here has a extra one they can offer up temporarily or long term for you. We lived out of ice chests for 4 weeks after Ike. Hang in there buddy!

        This just drums up all the bad memories of ike that we went through 9 years ago. There were some good things too though. The Tide truck that was washing peoples clothes for free...one of my co workers who came over every day without being asked to help clean up my place, the police who came by and charged our phones for us. I try to remember that there were some good moments too now but when i go and look at all my pictures in my September folder 9 years ago..it is pretty depressing and just reminds me of what everyone in Houston is going through right now. Don't give up and just keep on keeping on. Flood damage is the worst...well..maybe fire is the worst, but flood is number 2 the worst thing people go through in these hurricanes. There are tons of people around the world that still have it way worse than us. And that poor guy who lost 6 family members. That just chokes me up thinking what he is going through.
        Last edited by Yosarian; 3 weeks ago.
        Want to learn everything about the Texans cap? There is no better site out there than this one. Thanks Troy. Amazing work buddy!
        TexansCap.com

        Comment


        • #34
          Originally posted by Mae_Anne12 View Post
          Hi folks,

          I kind of like missing out the news, I evacuated my place because water flood are in the level of a human height, I don't know now if how was it, I am in Oklahoma Texas right now, my place is in San Antonio.

          Can you give me updates how's the condition in San Antonio?
          Just got back from Pappasitos in SA on I-10. Coming in from the Hill Country...NO gas anywhere. Still haven't seen the libs in ecstasy over that fact. Thought they all hated cars and big oil. Instead they are leading the hypocrite whine game.

          Comment


          • #35


            Houston Texans @HoustonTexans
            The whole squad and their families are ready to distribute 10 semi trucks of supplies across the greater Houston area. #TexansHelpingTexans
            @gregmancz
            These past four days I have had the privilege of going out to multiple areas and working with some great people! It has truly shown me the pride, passion and the level of caring that Texans, and everyone across the world, can have for each other. That being said I am thrilled to say I will get the opportunity to represent this city on Sunday's this season, and more thrilled that I can continue to help with the rebuilding of this city! From putting a smile on someone's face, to distributing food and rebuilding homes, there is much more to do, and I am excited to be able to help along the journey. #hoUStonstrong #proudtexan #undraftedto53year3
            @s_anderson89
            These last couple of weeks have been a truly humbling experience. As this city continues to rebuild, it is great to be a part of it and lend out a helping hand. It has been amazing seeing the influence that @justinjames99 as well as the rest of my teammates have on this community. Even though this city was hit hard with rains, winds, and flooding, I take away from this the resilience that has been on full display from this community. I have seen countless examples of people who decided that they were NOT going to be victims of their circumstances but they would take it a step further by ensuring that others around them would not be either. These last couple of days have proven that there are hero's in plain clothes as well as the hero's who put on uniforms. This all makes the hashtag #HoustonStrong a true definition of this community. There is still work to be done but I know that with this resilient attitude, all the areas that were affected will be back on its feet soon. I am honored to be here and part of this team. This is the right place for me and I know that NRG will be rocking next Sunday. I will see you guys there #WeAreTexans #HoustonStrong #TexasStrong
            Dj Reader @Djread98
            It's amazing what we can do when we all pitch in! #HelpingHouston #Texans
            Aaron Wilson @AaronWilson_NFL
            Texans head trainer Geoff Kaplan, whose family was rescued during Hurricane Harvey, said his family is doing well
            Adam Wexler @awexlerKPRC
            #Texans @DeAndreHopkins @BraxtonMiller5 & many teammates at one of their handout locations w/ their donated supplies. #HoustonStrong @KPRC2
            James Palmer @JamesPalmerTV
            J.J. Watt said everything that is being distributed today, 10 semi trucks worth, is just from donations.

            Haven't touched the 17 million
            $18 million.



            Texans players after Harvey: 'We'll put Houston on our backs'

            For J.J. Watt's charity, team members unload semis of donated goods

            By Maggie Gordon
            Hundreds of cars lined up outside the north Main Church of God in Christ Sunday afternoon, popping trunks as volunteers loaded them up with cases of water and other necessities, donated through J.J. Watt's initiative, which has raised more than $15 million.

            "It was tough − not being in here during the storm was a real tough situation," said offensive tackle Chris Clark, who was one of about 50 Texans distributing goods throughout the city Sunday.

            WANT TO HELP? Where you can give time, goods or money

            "With our families being here, and not knowing what's going on, just seeing the devastation on the television, getting back was a priority for us," he said. "Getting back and lending a hand and helping out. You know, I'm a big strong guy, so I'm sure we can do a lot."

            Throughout the course of the morning, he and members of his team unloaded three semi trucks of donations, carrying everything from cases of water to jugs of bleach to the staging area set up in the church parking lot. then they got to work loading them into the line of hundreds of cars waiting for assistance.

            "It's been terrible out here," said Richard Tillman, a 62-year-old resident of Independence Heights. He hasn't been able to get to work for eight days, and though his home didn't take on any ground water, he suffered water damage from a leaky roof.

            On Sunday, he picked up water, cleaning supplies and an armful of books for his grandchildren after his were drenched from the rain.

            "But as hard as it's been, it's been a blessing," he said,after a group of men loaded the supplies into his SUV. "People have been helping out, going in and helping the community, and it's been hard. But it's been wonderful to see this too."

            For Pastor Willie Collins, seeing his parking lot transform into a staging area for donations was nothing short of miraculous. Independence Heights has been hit hard with disasters before, but they've rarely seen the relief he's asked for.

            "I heard J.J. Watt was going to do some unconventional giving, and that's what we needed," he said.

            "Because as a general rule, we never get included when they go through the Red Cross, United Way and other stuff. We're the last people on the totem pole. So we went to (Watt's) foundation and asked for help."

            It took one phone call, he said.

            "We made a general call to the main number. The lady answering asked who I was, asked if we have a 501(c)(3), and we gave them the numbers, faxed them the information and that was it," he said. "Next thing I know, we've got three semis full of supplies."

            He's always been a J.J. Watt fan, he said. But now the defensive end's legend looms even larger.

            And Watt's not the only Texan being praised in this neighborhood, just north of Interstae 10.

            "You have kids who've had to wade out in flood water and see their homes taken apart, and their toys and their books all gone," said Tanya Debose, director of the Independence Heights Redevelopment Council, which helped organize the 200 volunteers that assisted in Sunday's effort.

            "And to have those players here, that just really brightened their day," she said. "I know this is a takeaway they'll have forever. And the thing that really got me? They were willing to sign autographs, they were taking selfies. They were really speaking to the people, talking to them and asking what they needed. It wasn't a photo opp.

            "So J.J. Watt? He's my guy. He made all this stuff happen."

            With more than $17 million raised by Watt's charity efforts, the Texans have their distribution work cut out for them in the next several weeks. They'll be rolling up their sleeves around the community.

            But their efforts won't end in church parking lots, Clark said. He plans to play and win for Houston all season long.

            "This is one of those things where you try to take the city on our back. And we'll put Houston on our backs and just push forward with it," he said. "We want to give people something to cheer for, something to be happy about at a devastating time like this."


            Displaced from flooded home, Texans' Brian Peters: 'It's been a rollercoaster'

            By Aaron Wilson
            When Texans special-teams ace Brian Peters was finally able to return to his flooded home in Bellaire in the wake of Hurricane Harvey, he was immediately hit with the stench of rotting and mildew.

            His home was flooded with roughly three feet of water, damaging his furniture, appliances and other possessions.

            Peters' landlord tried to salvage the situation by placing the linebacker's furniture on cinderblocks, managing to save the inside linebacker's computer in the process.

            And Peters' teammates, including tight end Ryan Griffin, linebackers Shakeel Rashad and Eric Lee, fullback Jay Prosch and center Greg Mancz, came over to help.

            "The first thing that impacts you is the smell when you walk in the house," Peters said Sunday while handing out supplies to flooding victims at the Jewish Community Center in Meyerland.

            "My teammates came to my rescue. I had five guys move out the water-logged furniture and ended up helping some of my neighbors, too.

            "My landlord out of the kindness of his heart -- I didn't prepare for the hurricane at all because we were in New Orleans -- came over and put all the furniture on blocks. He saved a lot of my stuff, especially my computer, which was really the only priceless thing in that mess. It's just the kindness of strangers."

            When the bayou overflowed near Peters' rented home, it flooded his entire neighborhood.

            "Up and down, it's been a rollercoaster," Peters said. "My neighborhood got hit pretty hard. You've got everybody with their lives and their furniture out on the curb. It's been interesting, but it's been awesome to see the community come together to rebuild."

            Peters emphasized that his personal story of woe doesn't compare to the tragedies many others have endured. He was happy to hand out bottles of water, miniature footballs and food Sunday to those impacted by the historic storm.

            "We've got a great team and great community service and player development department," Peters said. "What J.J. [Watt] has done is way too much along with the generosity of millions of people. It's what you do when people are hurting. Everybody is hurting. A lot of people were hit way harder than I was."

            The Texans open the season Sunday against the Jacksonville Jaguars. It figures to be an emotional day for a city that's been rocked by massive flooding, fatalities and property damage.

            "It's definitely a welcome distraction," Peters said. "We have a lot to give back to the city. We're kind of torn between doing our jobs and wanting to give our heart and soul to the city. We want to put our best performance on the field to represent our city with pride."
            Last edited by H2O4me; 2 weeks ago.
            If you're not following the Astros, you are doing Houston sports wrong.

            Comment


            • #36

              Photo: Brett Coomer

              Texans step up with a city in need


              By Brian T. Smith
              The cars backed up as far as you could see and the summer heat had kicked in when the sign went up.

              Blue tape to hold it. Three men stretching it out. A white banner featuring blue and red words.

              Hurricane Harvey Relief Supplies.

              Sponsored by: Justin J. Watt Foundation.

              "You get a box yet?"

              "Keep moving! Keep moving!"

              "Water or Gatorade?!"

              There was a black Chevy Trailblazer followed by a Pontiac Vibe in a line that stretched to Interstate 45 and crawled for hours Sunday. Then a silver Saturn Vue that had seen better days, a Nissan Altima with a temporary license plate and cars filled with people that just kept coming.

              Christian Covington, Alfred Blue, Shane Lechler and Derek Newton lifted and loaded. The Texans reached out to their city again after Harvey, this time employing 10 semitrucks and distributing basic items - hygiene products, diapers, pet supplies, cleaning materials - at four locations.

              "This is a city not run by one person. This is a city that's run by 2.3 million Houstonians," said Mayor Sylvester Turner, who joined Watt in the delivery line. "And if somebody is down and somebody is up, the one that's up is going to reach to catch the one that's down. That's just the way it works. If somebody is without and somebody has, you hand them the box and then you pass it on."

              'Take your time'

              The majority of items distributed by the team came from Watt's home state of Wisconsin. Which meant that the $18 million-plus raised by No. 99 for Harvey relief has yet to be touched. Watt said he'll formulate a plan for the donation money before it's used to help those in need.

              "I've talked to people that were in (Hurricane) Katrina," Watt said. "I learned from what they did right and also learned from their mistakes. The biggest thing everybody keeps telling me is take your time, make sure you do it right. So that's exactly what I'm going to do. I'm going to take my time, make sure that I work with local organizations and we do it right here in the city, so that money goes straight to the people here of Houston who need it the most."

              The three-time NFL Defensive Player of the Year has been the driving force behind the Texans' Harvey involvement, which has seen the organization spend more than an hour interacting with victims inside the NRG Center shelter and hold a separate relief day since the team returned to Houston on Wednesday evening.

              The commitment has been contagious. While Watt kept putting brown boxes filled with goods in car trunks and back seats - regularly pausing for a few seconds to take selfies with passengers - Covington blended in with Aldine's high school football team, trading constant jokes while turning water versus Gatorade into a heated debate.

              "This is a tragic event. But you don't want to build on that tragedy," said the former Rice standout, wearing an "I am Groot" shirt that would make cool teenagers everywhere proud. "You want to be able to build the morale of any situation that we're in. To be able to be out there at an event like this you want to show that you're in good spirits and bless those good spirits onto everybody."

              Being a servant

              As young volunteers from area schools - Davis, Nimitz, MacArthur, Eisenhower - waited inside Carroll's cafeteria for a chance to help out, Lechler wore a HoUSton shirt in Watt's distribution line.

              Blocks away: Front doors, furniture and TVs piled up as curbside trash for as far as the eye could see. Across from the school: A sign advertising a Fresh Water Supply District and an American flag waving on a pole.

              Harvey's symbols and reminders are everywhere.

              "You have to learn how to be a servant," said Aldine coach Hank Semler, whose team arrived at 8 a.m. to aid the Texans' relief drive. "You really do. You have to learn how to serve others."

              Sunday was just the first stage of Watt's service. The master plan for the $18 million (and counting) is still to come.

              Right now, it's taped-up boxes and plastic-wrapped bottles. The face of the Texans using his name the right way. For Houston and with the city he calls home.

              "We've got water over there for you," said Watt, as another box was loaded into another waiting car.
              If you're not following the Astros, you are doing Houston sports wrong.

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by jkeener71 View Post

                Hopefully 70% of us aren't left high and dry.
                This is what I can tell you after going through Sandy (which, despite the media sensationalism, was not nearly as bad as what Houston is facing right now). I was fortunate in that my home suffered no damage from Sandy. I know several people that suffered pretty significant damage, though, and this is what I learned from them.

                1. Your biggest enemy is going to be mold. Carpet can be replaced. Drywall can be replaced. Appliances can be replaced. But once mold growth starts, it can be very difficult to get rid of and mold growth in a structure can cause the place to be unhealthy to live in. We were somewhat fortunate in that Sandy hit us during Halloween as we were going into November, so it was fairly cool outside. We had daytime highs in the 50s and overnight lows in the 40s. That sucked when you didn't have any heat because the power was out for two weeks, but the cooler temperatures were less conducive to mold growth. It will probably be harder for you because you are further south and it is earlier in the year. Get things as dry as you can as quickly as you can. It is one thing to dry out the rooms, but you also have water inside the walls. That is harder. Dry, dry, dry. That is the mantra.

                2. Don't hold your breath waiting for FEMA. It's probably going to be a while before you see anything from them. The problem that a lot of people had here is that FEMA wanted to inspect the damage before any repairs were started, and a lot of people had to wait months before FEMA was even able to inspect the damage.......let alone provide any assistance. Due to the mold problem, that was unacceptable to a lot of people so they started repairs without FEMA involvement and forfeited FEMA aid. For the people that did wait for FEMA, some of them were out of their homes for a year. I don't know what to tell you with regard to that. It is one of those situations where you get kicked no matter what you do.

                3. Beware of scammers posing as FEMA representatives. After the storm here, you would see people walking around out on the street with clipboards claiming that they were assessing the damage for FEMA. They would ask you questions about houses and whether people were living there, etc. I don't think they had anything to do with FEMA. I think they were trying to get information about which houses were occupied and which were abandoned so that they could break into the abandoned homes at night. Maybe I am just cynical, but all kinds of red flags went up in my mind when they started asking questions. My recommendation if people ask you questions about houses is to tell them that you know the owners and you know the house is occupied because you talked to them yesterday.........and maybe throw in something about how many guns they own and how you go shooting together on the weekends.

                Stay strong. It is going to be challenging.

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by JCPatriot View Post
                  This is what I can tell you after going through Sandy...
                  Great info, man, thanks for posting that,

                  And to Houston Texans Message Boards!
                  If you're not following the Astros, you are doing Houston sports wrong.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by JCPatriot View Post

                    This is what I can tell you after going through Sandy (which, despite the media sensationalism, was not nearly as bad as what Houston is facing right now). I was fortunate in that my home suffered no damage from Sandy. I know several people that suffered pretty significant damage, though, and this is what I learned from them.

                    1. Your biggest enemy is going to be mold. Carpet can be replaced. Drywall can be replaced. Appliances can be replaced. But once mold growth starts, it can be very difficult to get rid of and mold growth in a structure can cause the place to be unhealthy to live in. We were somewhat fortunate in that Sandy hit us during Halloween as we were going into November, so it was fairly cool outside. We had daytime highs in the 50s and overnight lows in the 40s. That sucked when you didn't have any heat because the power was out for two weeks, but the cooler temperatures were less conducive to mold growth. It will probably be harder for you because you are further south and it is earlier in the year. Get things as dry as you can as quickly as you can. It is one thing to dry out the rooms, but you also have water inside the walls. That is harder. Dry, dry, dry. That is the mantra.

                    2. Don't hold your breath waiting for FEMA. It's probably going to be a while before you see anything from them. The problem that a lot of people had here is that FEMA wanted to inspect the damage before any repairs were started, and a lot of people had to wait months before FEMA was even able to inspect the damage.......let alone provide any assistance. Due to the mold problem, that was unacceptable to a lot of people so they started repairs without FEMA involvement and forfeited FEMA aid. For the people that did wait for FEMA, some of them were out of their homes for a year. I don't know what to tell you with regard to that. It is one of those situations where you get kicked no matter what you do.

                    3. Beware of scammers posing as FEMA representatives. After the storm here, you would see people walking around out on the street with clipboards claiming that they were assessing the damage for FEMA. They would ask you questions about houses and whether people were living there, etc. I don't think they had anything to do with FEMA. I think they were trying to get information about which houses were occupied and which were abandoned so that they could break into the abandoned homes at night. Maybe I am just cynical, but all kinds of red flags went up in my mind when they started asking questions. My recommendation if people ask you questions about houses is to tell them that you know the owners and you know the house is occupied because you talked to them yesterday.........and maybe throw in something about how many guns they own and how you go shooting together on the weekends.

                    Stay strong. It is going to be challenging.
                    All good points! Welcome to the boards.
                    Want to learn everything about the Texans cap? There is no better site out there than this one. Thanks Troy. Amazing work buddy!
                    TexansCap.com

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by JCPatriot View Post

                      This is what I can tell you after going through Sandy (which, despite the media sensationalism, was not nearly as bad as what Houston is facing right now). I was fortunate in that my home suffered no damage from Sandy. I know several people that suffered pretty significant damage, though, and this is what I learned from them.

                      1. Your biggest enemy is going to be mold. Carpet can be replaced. Drywall can be replaced. Appliances can be replaced. But once mold growth starts, it can be very difficult to get rid of and mold growth in a structure can cause the place to be unhealthy to live in. We were somewhat fortunate in that Sandy hit us during Halloween as we were going into November, so it was fairly cool outside. We had daytime highs in the 50s and overnight lows in the 40s. That sucked when you didn't have any heat because the power was out for two weeks, but the cooler temperatures were less conducive to mold growth. It will probably be harder for you because you are further south and it is earlier in the year. Get things as dry as you can as quickly as you can. It is one thing to dry out the rooms, but you also have water inside the walls. That is harder. Dry, dry, dry. That is the mantra.

                      2. Don't hold your breath waiting for FEMA. It's probably going to be a while before you see anything from them. The problem that a lot of people had here is that FEMA wanted to inspect the damage before any repairs were started, and a lot of people had to wait months before FEMA was even able to inspect the damage.......let alone provide any assistance. Due to the mold problem, that was unacceptable to a lot of people so they started repairs without FEMA involvement and forfeited FEMA aid. For the people that did wait for FEMA, some of them were out of their homes for a year. I don't know what to tell you with regard to that. It is one of those situations where you get kicked no matter what you do.

                      3. Beware of scammers posing as FEMA representatives. After the storm here, you would see people walking around out on the street with clipboards claiming that they were assessing the damage for FEMA. They would ask you questions about houses and whether people were living there, etc. I don't think they had anything to do with FEMA. I think they were trying to get information about which houses were occupied and which were abandoned so that they could break into the abandoned homes at night. Maybe I am just cynical, but all kinds of red flags went up in my mind when they started asking questions. My recommendation if people ask you questions about houses is to tell them that you know the owners and you know the house is occupied because you talked to them yesterday.........and maybe throw in something about how many guns they own and how you go shooting together on the weekends.

                      Stay strong. It is going to be challenging.
                      Thanks for the info.

                      Well an official FEMA person came to my house on Saturday. Still waiting to see how much money I get. Will update everyone once I know.

                      Again, hopefully all those millions of dollars (JJ Watt, etc) go to actually helping Flood victims. And damage to one's home to me is pretty important.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        JJ Watt‏ @JJWatt
                        If you're not following the Astros, you are doing Houston sports wrong.

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Mark Berman @MarkBermanFox26
                          HEB's Scott McClelland announces $5 million donation to @JJWatt hurricane recovery and relief fund from HEB owner Charles Butt
                          If you're not following the Astros, you are doing Houston sports wrong.

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Originally posted by dancingbear View Post

                            Just got back from Pappasitos in SA on I-10. Coming in from the Hill Country...NO gas anywhere. Still haven't seen the libs in ecstasy over that fact. Thought they all hated cars and big oil. Instead they are leading the hypocrite whine game.
                            I heard this news 2 days ago and up till now? No gas everywhere? What about in other places of Dallas?

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Originally posted by Yosarian View Post

                              Harvey blew my power line down. Just got power on a few hours ago. No water damage inside house and we are ok. Didn't lose any cars either. For me ....nothing compared to Ike. I guess we were spared this time.

                              Feeling for everyone in the flood zones. Been there..it is very traumatic and just bad. When I was feeling over whelmed during clean up after Ike this helped me through. Just do a little every day. One thing at a time. Don't look at the big picture. Do what you can and people will help you get it all done!!!! I am 9 years removed from Ike and still not living in my house. I learned a lot from Ike though. I took half a day off last Friday and started putting everything I own 5 feet in the air which continued Saturday and Sunday. Had a plan for the cars. And was ready for the worst with generator and gas and food and supplies. Generator ran 33 hours this time. Didn't have one during Ike. I learned I need a bigger generator this time. Wouldn't run the ac but at least we had a fan and our fridge running.


                              Don't hold your breath for FEMA keener. They will give you something. My house had 4 feet of water damage plus the whole roof and lost 4 cars and every appliance I had and fema gave us 1200 dollars to make things right. Wasn't very helpful. If I had an extra fridge I would offer it up but we gave the little one we had to our granddaughter. Maybe someone on here has a extra one they can offer up temporarily or long term for you. We lived out of ice chests for 4 weeks after Ike. Hang in there buddy!

                              This just drums up all the bad memories of ike that we went through 9 years ago. There were some good things too though. The Tide truck that was washing peoples clothes for free...one of my co workers who came over every day without being asked to help clean up my place, the police who came by and charged our phones for us. I try to remember that there were some good moments too now but when i go and look at all my pictures in my September folder 9 years ago..it is pretty depressing and just reminds me of what everyone in Houston is going through right now. Don't give up and just keep on keeping on. Flood damage is the worst...well..maybe fire is the worst, but flood is number 2 the worst thing people go through in these hurricanes. There are tons of people around the world that still have it way worse than us. And that poor guy who lost 6 family members. That just chokes me up thinking what he is going through.
                              This is seriously a mess right now. Dallas citizens needs help especially those families who lost homes, food and others. I couldn't imagine what it feels like suffering from the breezy cold.

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                JJ Watt @JJWatt
                                $30 MILLION! And tomorrow is Gameday!

                                YouCaring.com/JJWatt
                                If you're not following the Astros, you are doing Houston sports wrong.

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