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Draft a QB in 2017? I like Brad Kaaya, If Anyone

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  • Draft a QB in 2017? I like Brad Kaaya, If Anyone

    After watching highlights and interviews with the top prospects, I can see why many think there's not a single 1st round QB in this draft...

    Mahomes' feet do all kinds of weird things, weirder than Osweiler's windup and sidearm. In half his highlight reel throws, he plants on his back leg and opens his stance. It's kind of hard to believe a QB would have that habit, and it seems too bizarre to change.

    Trubisky just doesn't seem NFL smart. "I'm a big football guy," he says in his interview with Mayock. Really, that's great; glad you're not bringing in lacrosse ideas to your football-type sports playing. How can this guy be a leader?

    Watson is supposedly a gym rat. But I can't tell how smart or how much of a leader he is. I read "quiet leader." Can't argue the results.

    Kizer has bad accuracy.

    The one who impressed me in both fundamental form, accuracy, quick decision making and smarts in interviews was Brad Kaaya of Miami.

    But that's just from highlight reels and 1 interview each.
    Last edited by tko54321; 04-29-2017, 12:54 AM.

  • #2
    I was liking Kaaya too tbf so you're not alone.

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    • #3
      I like Kaaya too, but I'm usually wrong.

      Comment


      • #4




        Brad Kaaya*, QB, Miami
        Height: 6-4. Weight: 214. Hand: 9.75.
        Projected Round (2017): 4-6.


        3/18/17: One general manager of a playoff team that is very skilled at quarterback evaluation said they had Kaaya as fifth-round pick. They feel he has no mobility, can't throw well while under pressure, and while his arm is decent, he doesn't blow them away. Two other teams said they graded Kaaya as a late third-, early fourth-rounder. Multiple teams also expressed that they have concerns about Kaaya lacking leadership. As expected, he threw the ball well at the combine.

        In 2016, Kaaya completed 62 percent of his passes for 3,532 yards with 27 touchdowns and seven interceptions. He, specifically, put together underwhelming performances in losses to Florida State and North Carolina. Kaaya has some crippling weaknesses in looking down at the rush and a lack of mobility to avoid sacks. He takes a lot of sacks, and his eyes don't stay downfield when under pressure.

        Kaaya's game against Appalachian State illustrated that he has serious pocket-passing talent for the NFL though. His protection was an issue in other outings, but when Kaaya is given time, he's deadly. Kaaya showed that he has a big arm, pocket presence, is accurate in tight windows, can throw perfect touch passes, and has field vision to work through his protections. The problem is he has to be able to thrive without a perfect pocket to throw from, which puts too much pressure on his offensive line to be flawless.
        Although I don't see a "big arm" -- his ball velocity was in lower half of QBs at the Combine.



        • 6'4" HEIGHT
        • 32" ARM LENGTH
        • 214 LBS.WEIGHT
        • 9 3/4" HANDS
        OVERVIEW
        Even though Kaaya was an all-state quarterback out of Los Angeles (his mother, Angela, is an actress), it was a bit of a surprise when he beat out transfer Jake Heaps for the starting job as a true freshman. He went through growing pains in that 6-7 season with the 'Canes (58.5 completion pct, 3,198 yards, 26 TD, 12 INT). Kaaya improved his game in 2015, earning third-team All-ACC recognition after leading the conference with 274.5 passing yards per game (61.2 completion pct, 16 TD, five INT). He continued that career arc this fall (62.0 completion pct, 3,532 yards, 27 TD, seven INT), even though he was left off All-ACC teams in a conference full of talented quarterbacks.

        STRENGTHS
        Three-year starter and pro-style pocket passer. Experienced and comfortable under center and in play-action offense. Has shown an ability to read the entire field when asked. Gets through progressions fairly quickly. Expedites release and throws to an area in front of the route when blitz is closing in. Always looking to throw past sticks on third down. Understands his arm limitations and rarely takes unnecessary chances throwing into space. Rhythm passer comfortable working in timing-based passing attack. Schooled on mechanics of the position since he was eight years old. Uses well-timed climbs and slides to maneuver away from pressure. Footwork is consistent and well-rehearsed. Ball stays tucked under his ear until he cuts it loose with relatively quick wrist flick. Throws on balance with easy delivery. Delivers feathery soft deep ball with good trajectory and ability to drop the nose of the ball into a bucket. Gets ball out early on field-side throws to mitigate lack of velocity.

        WEAKNESSES
        Accuracy and ball placement can be sketchy. Will rush throws and "work early" rather than throw with velocity into tight windows. Front side opens early, causing passes to sail. Consistently poor accuracy on intermediate work. Completed just 38 percent of his passes between 11-20 yards in 2016. Underthrows deep balls and fails to consistently hit crossers and slants in stride. Arm strength lags behind NFL norm. Throws hang in air or nose-dive prematurely when throwing field side. Rigid, mechanical approach as passer. Lacks arm talent and improvisational skills to create magic with off-balance throws on the move. Fails to see and exploit anticipatory throws between linebackers and safeties. Lacks mobility outside the pocket and will give into the pressure -- at times taking the sack rather than getting rid of the ball.

        SOURCES TELL US
        I really love his mental makeup and I want to like him more as a prospect. I just think someone is going to overdraft the person or the intangibles. At the end of the day, he has to throw with better accuracy and velocity or hell be just another guy. -- Director of pro personnel for NFC team

        NFL COMPARISON
        Cody Kessler

        BOTTOM LINE
        Groomed to be a quarterback from an early age, Kaaya flashes the mechanics and intelligence of a player who has spent hours in quarterback camps. However, he can be too mechanical and thinks too much rather than just flowing and responding to what the field offers him. Kaaya could have used another year of college, but he has the tools and intangibles to become an NFL starter. While he can work around his average arm strength, he must improve his accuracy and anticipation if he is to make a mark in the NFL.
        If you're not following the Astros, you are doing Houston sports wrong.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by H2O4me View Post






          Although I don't see a "big arm" -- his ball velocity was in lower half of QBs at the Combine.


          Just say NO!

          He stares at his feet when he feels pressure and either takes a sack or will still throw it...and in the NFL that's INT city same with slowly thrown passes
          JJ Watt & Co ready to destroy

          Comment


          • #6
            Tom Brady has a strong arm, like Montana did, in short to intermediate throws, but neither had a huge arm throwing downfield. Brady lofts balls accurately. So I'm not worried much about who has a cannon arm, Mallett has that. Who cares? Feeling pressure and lowering your eyes IS bad. But he's made for West Coast Offense.

            I think it's more fixable than Mahomes' legwork. I call it legwork, not footwork, because he leans backward onto his back leg often when he throws, not forward onto the forward leg that provides all your lower body power. Imagine a baseball pitcher kicking backward off the rubber and having to throw harder to compensate. That's what Mahomes does to a smaller degree. You're losing so much power and leverage doing that. And having to lock your back leg as a support like that is begging for a knee injury from the motion itself, let alone from pass rushers hitting you at that point.

            I give Mahomes credit for arm strength and accuracy to compensate for his needlessly wasteful mechanics and for his accuracy throwing on the run. But I don't know how you address that. Maybe have him pitch some baseballs? Any coaches out there who want to chime in?
            Last edited by tko54321; 03-24-2017, 08:28 PM.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by tko54321 View Post
              Tom Brady has a strong arm, like Montana did, in short to intermediate throws, but neither had a huge arm throwing downfield. Brady lofts balls accurately. So I'm not worried much about who has a cannon arm, Mallett has that. Who cares? Feeling pressure and lowering your eyes IS bad. But he's made for West Coast Offense.

              I think it's more fixable than Mahomes' legwork. I call it legwork, not footwork, because he leans backward onto his back leg often when he throws, not forward onto the forward leg that provides all your lower body power. Imagine a baseball pitcher kicking backward off the rubber and having to throw harder to compensate. That's what Mahomes does to a smaller degree. You're losing so much power and leverage doing that. And having to lock your back leg as a support like that is begging for a knee injury from the motion itself, let alone from pass rushers hitting you at that point.

              I give Mahomes credit for arm strength and accuracy to compensate for his needlessly wasteful mechanics and for his accuracy throwing on the run. But I don't know how you address that. Maybe have him pitch some baseballs? Any coaches out there who want to chime in?
              He is slow and can't handle the rush. If you can fix that and somehow get him better velocity on his passes (worst at combine)...then maybe
              JJ Watt & Co ready to destroy

              Comment


              • #8
                Kaaya is flying under the radar a bit compared to these other QBs,

                He should probably be included in the 2nd tier of guys and he hasn't been.

                Kansas City would be a good fit for him, imo.




                My concerns are about his mental processing. When talking about himself he gets hung on a word... long pauses to gather his thoughts, slow/halted speaking pace, uses wrong word sometimes. Talking about someone else and it's normal pace. He's a real jock, brought up to be a robo-QB. Had 3 different offensive schemes in 3 years at Miami.
                If you're not following the Astros, you are doing Houston sports wrong.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by H2O4me View Post
                  Kaaya is flying under the radar a bit compared to these other QBs,

                  He should probably be included in the 2nd tier of guys and he hasn't been.

                  Kansas City would be a good fit for him, imo.




                  My concerns are about his mental processing. When talking about himself he gets hung on a word... long pauses to gather his thoughts, slow/halted speaking pace, uses wrong word sometimes. Talking about someone else and it's normal pace. He's a real jock, brought up to be a robo-QB. Had 3 different offensive schemes in 3 years at Miami.
                  Remember the last QB that was brought up to be a super QB? Todd (forgive my butcher of his last name) Marinivitch, kid from birth on special food and all that and gets to the NFL and the Raiders think they struck gold. He flamed out before the season was over. I don't trust the "groomed and raised to be a super player" stuff.
                  JJ Watt & Co ready to destroy

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Matt_in_KW View Post

                    Remember the last QB that was brought up to be a super QB? Todd (forgive my butcher of his last name) Marinivitch, kid from birth on special food and all that and gets to the NFL and the Raiders think they struck gold. He flamed out before the season was over. I don't trust the "groomed and raised to be a super player" stuff.
                    Marinovich's problems were unique to himself. He never wanted to be what his father decided he would be at a young age, and he's an addict.

                    Most top QBs these days are raised to be, that, as are bball players and tennis players and soccer players and golfers. The best QBs end up in the the Elite 11 programs. Difference is, when the kid wants out, he's out and moves on to whatever else he chooses to do.
                    If you're not following the Astros, you are doing Houston sports wrong.

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                    • #11
                      Here is a good write up and Kaaya is in the top 3 of prospects to be most successful in the NFL.

                      https://www.fanragsports.com/nfl/qbs...ikely-succeed/

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                      • #12
                        I mentioned having Mahomes pitch baseballs to re-program his footwork, and now I see he played baseball almost all his life. In his Mayock interview, Mahomes talks about learning new footwork and mechanics. Huh? Now? Not in the Texas Tech offseason? I guess Tech is like so many other colleges in not caring much about developing athletes, just using them.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by tko54321 View Post
                          I mentioned having Mahomes pitch baseballs to re-program his footwork, and now I see he played baseball almost all his life...
                          His father was a MLB pitcher from 1992-2003.

                          If you're not following the Astros, you are doing Houston sports wrong.

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                          • #14
                            Interesting.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by djl3485 View Post
                              Here is a good write up and Kaaya is in the top 3 of prospects to be most successful in the NFL.

                              https://www.fanragsports.com/nfl/qbs...ikely-succeed/
                              So 1 writer likes him, glad he isn't Rick Smith, or we would have issues at QB...as we already do. Only Kayaa would just stare at his feet while being blitzed (heck even seeing a D player) then limp wrist a pass (still looking at his feet) for an INT. Watch his games and then read ball velocity of combine QBs, guess who is the lowest...Kayaa. So deep, accurate passes...nope
                              JJ Watt & Co ready to destroy

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