Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Welcome QB Deshaun Watson

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Originally posted by shishkabob View Post

    you literally just posted this in another topic stop spamming crap.
    It also goes with this topic and the other. It isn't a new thread
    JJ Watt & Co ready to destroy

    Comment


    • Im trying to see the velocity issues in this clip. Can you guys help me out. Im seeing great touch, some heat when its needed and pretty darn good ball placement. Hes hit a few back shoulder passes , drop quite a few in the bucket, and leading his receivers. Most importantly he stands tall in the pocket. I only seen few in which he lookedto one side and threw to the other side.
       
      sigpic

      Bleeds Texans Blue Red and White Blood.

      Comment


      • Deshaun Watson gets $8.25 million signing bonus from Texans

        By John McClain
        As the Texans' first-round draft choice, quarterback Deshaun Watson signed the most lucrative contract.

        Watson, who led Clemson to a victory over Alabama in the national championship game last season, signed a four-year contract worth $13.85 million, including an $8.25 million signing bonus.

        Watson, the 12th overall pick in the first round, is on the practice field with his teammates today at the rookie minicamp.

        All rookies sign four-year contracts.

        Watson's base salaries are $465,000, $555,000, $862,249 and $1.177 million.

        Watson also receives training camp roster bonuses in the last three years of his contract worth $539,749 (2018), $862,249 (2019) and $1.17 million (2020). The last two roster bonuses match his base salaries.
        Last edited by H2O4me; 1 week ago.
        In 2016 Brock Osweiler was rated last (32nd) among all QBs (>400 attempts) by ProFootballFocus and ranked 33rd/34 QBs (>200 attempts) by Football Outsiders.

        Comment




        • Texans rookie QB Deshaun Watson getting plenty of hands-on coaching from Bill O'Brien

          By John McClain
          Quarterback Deshaun Watson will spend so much time with Texans coach Bill O'Brien this season they might as well be roommates.

          That kind of attention from the head coach should make for a smoother transition into the NFL for Watson, the first-round pick from Clemson. He's the first to admit he's a student with a lot to learn, and he's glad O'Brien is helping to teach him.

          "I think it's cool to be able to have your head coach and the main guy that knows this system to be hands-on in the meeting rooms with you and on the field with you," Watson said Saturday, his second day on the field at the rookie minicamp. "You can learn it firsthand and see what he sees (so you can) be that same coach on the field."

          O'Brien is the regular play-caller for the first time since 2014, his first season with the Texans. He said Saturday he's more involved with the offense.

          New language to learn

          O'Brien has spent the last three days coaching Watson in meetings and on the field.

          "He's a hard-working guy," O'Brien said. "He pays attention in the meetings. Competitive guy.

          "We start him with what we call the basic information section of the playbook. How do we huddle? Where do you go in the huddle? If the Houston Texans are on this sideline, you're on this side of the huddle. If you're on (that) sideline, you're on (that) side of the huddle. I mean, it's that simple. It's that detailed.

          "Then it goes to how we call a play. What's the verbiage of a play call? Obviously, our verbiage is a lot different than what he had at Clemson. It's like learning a new language."

          In that case, Watson needs to become fluent in this second language.

          "It's like learning Spanish," Watson said. "It's a whole different terminology.

          "You have to flip everything you learned before, turn a page, learn something brand new and make sure you're on the same page with not just the coaches but your teammates.

          "It's going to take the hard work and the grind. You can want to be great, especially early, but it's a process. It's not going to happen overnight. It's going to take long nights and early mornings to be successful on the field."

          When he met with the rookies for the first time, O'Brien let them know what is expected of them. He reminded them that he doesn't care how they got to NRG Stadium - draft choice or undrafted free agent - the coaches judge them on how they prepare and perform.

          Watson gets the same treatment, even though general manager Rick Smith traded up from No. 25 to 12th in the first round to get him.

          "Show up every day and get better, simple as that," O'Brien said. "Improve on the things you need to improve on every day.

          "There's always going to be something, whether it's a play call or footwork or some type of decision at the line of scrimmage, that maybe you made a mistake on the day before or answered a question wrong in the meeting. Let's fix that."

          Watson, who led Clemson to the national championship game against Alabama as a sophomore and junior and ignited the Tigers to a come-from-behind victory last season, is eager to learn. He doesn't expect any favors.

          "It's just a different environment," Watson said. "This is the NFL. It's your job, your career. I'm focusing on the playbook, trying to improve and to make sure I master my craft, learn how coach O'Brien coaches.

          "It starts with the meetings and on the field, being able to communicate, being able to talk to each other, learn about each other, learn about how he teaches, learn how I learn and just making sure we're on the same page."

          'I'm a competitor'

          Watson knows Tom Savage and Brandon Weeden are in front of him in the QB ranks. How fast he moves up the depth chart depends on how fast he develops and how Savage plays.

          "I'm a competitor," Watson said. "Savage is the veteran guy. I'll learn from him, learn from Brandon and continue to improve.

          "I was a starter at Clemson the past three years, but I would go into the day thinking, 'I'm not the starter, and I could lose my job,' so for me that's natural. Everyone around me is getting better. As for as the competition, I'm just working on improving my skills."

          O'Brien believes Watson will make more progress when he's on the field with the veterans next week.

          "It's also good to visually see how it's done," O'Brien said. "We're running routes right now, (and) that's the first time these guys have seen these routes, whether it's a quarterback, a receiver, a tight end or a back.

          "Monday, (the rookies) can observe how it's supposed to be done. That goes a long way toward learning, too."
          In 2016 Brock Osweiler was rated last (32nd) among all QBs (>400 attempts) by ProFootballFocus and ranked 33rd/34 QBs (>200 attempts) by Football Outsiders.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by Texanballer View Post
            Im trying to see the velocity issues in this clip. Can you guys help me out. Im seeing great touch, some heat when its needed and pretty darn good ball placement. Hes hit a few back shoulder passes , drop quite a few in the bucket, and leading his receivers. Most importantly he stands tall in the pocket. I only seen few in which he lookedto one side and threw to the other side.
            I don't get into the velocity discussions because I don't understand the concept like some do. But my guess is if his velocity is questioned it may be due to/made up for by what seems to be a quick arm and release. He throws darts.

            Comment


            • A quick release helps compensate for the additional height and slower speed QBs with slower velocity have to put on balls. Pretty simple physics in that the slower the velocity the higher the ball must be thrown with respect to timing. Think of how some QBs throw balls down the hash, to the sidelines, and down the field with either a lot of air or harder lower balls (called frozen ropes). The higher a ball is thrown, the longer it takes to get there, thus giving corners and safeties time to close on the ball. QBs with low velocity have a more difficult time preventing interceptions on out-routes and anything over 30 yards. Of course velocity does matter a bit if the QB has poor touch or throws from an awkward angle making underneath throws inaccurate. Mallet, Osweiller, and Kap all struggle with underneath throws due to either a poor arm slot or elongated release points. Simply put, they had poor timing on short routes (due to a longer throwing motion and awkward arm slots). QBs with low velocity are helped by play-action and timing routes, which are some offenses are bread and butter. Our offense is a variation of Erhardt-Perkins with man blocking schemes, which requires QBs to throw both underneath and to all parts of the route tree, and to make run/pass protection calls pre-snap. The routes are conceptual, meaning a QB has to have the ability to throw into empty space (where receiver ends up) based of the read given to him by the defense. Both the receiver and the QB have to be on the same page. Velocity is a factor, as is anticipation, accuracy, and timing with our offense. I'll be interested to see how Watson compensates for his lack of velocity (tested at combine) with timing, release, and anticipation. I do think he will be better than any QB we have had at anticipating (conceptualizing) routes and with the timing of his release. I hope his velocity comes around. I am very confident he will work his rear off and do what is asked of him by OB. I don't think he will leave anything on the field. Whether that's good enough or not, I dont know. He will be the guy that makes or breaks the velocity argument though, because he stacks up above average for all the other measurables. Personally, unless he gets his velocity over 55, we won't have a deep game and will have to rely on the run, play action, and underneath routes (think Alex Smith).
              Edited to add in dictionary explanation. Equation for Velocity. The equation or formula for velocity is similar to speed. To figure out velocity, you divide the distance by the time it takes to travel that same distance, then you add your direction to it.

              Last edited by lrtexasman; 1 week ago.

              Comment


              • Originally posted by dancingbear View Post

                I don't get into the velocity discussions because I don't understand the concept like some do. But my guess is if his velocity is questioned it may be due to/made up for by what seems to be a quick arm and release. He throws darts.
                You pretty much have it down. Velocity is really just how quick the ball is moving when it leaves his hand.. But watson throws a clean ball. He anticipates. He puts some heat on it at times. He can lob it at times.. And he can deliver it like a dainty princess when he wants to. A good quarterback should be able to do all of that. There are guys with cannons who have many different problems due to their velocity. Throwing behind receivers is a common one.. Trying to fit them into tight windows because of overconfidence.. Throwing balls high.. Missing timing.. And guys with low velocity have some issues.. But I dont put much weight into velocity. Every throw on the field is different. Every receivers ability to catch is different. Every receiver and tight end has different timing. And from what ive seen.. Watson can make a larger percentage of those throws and adjusments than any other guy coming out. Trubisky looked good as well but in roughly 1/3 as much time as watson and without the winning pedigree. And a lot of quarterbacms fall apart under pressure. Andy dalton comes to mind. But when Deshaun is under pressure.. He seems to get an adrenaline spike and actually get MORE accurate. Thats the kind of thing you cant measure but always love to have. Remember.. Combine is the underwear olympics. Some guys do well throwing high velocity balls when JJ Watt or Joey Bosa aren't coming at them. But Watson throws the necessary ball even under pressure. Can't wait to see this kid in the Preseason. I hope he sits long enough to really get a grasp and isnt rushed out there.. But i think he can handle it in short order.
                sigpic

                Official Texans Beer Thread Creator

                Comment


                • Watson will need some time for the development process to eliminate some of the bugs in his game. Namely his penchant for tossing INT's. Why so many?

                  1. Over confidence in his receivers...threw too many jump balls that DB's came away with. That can be a bad habit that has to be broken. Several of the Texans recent QB's suffered from this same problem. Targeting DHops or AJ when things became a little shaky in the pockets...almost to the point of not even looking, just blindly throw the ball in their direction regardless of coverage. This makes it far to easy for defenses to anticipate when they know there will be pressure on the pocket.

                  2. Over confidence in his arm....maybe he's got confidence he shouldn't have. There have been several observations that his velocity could be much better with improved mechanics. If this is the issue, it's correctable but the corrections won't become habit until he can execute proper mechanics under duress.

                  3. Had trouble breaking down coverages....this could be an issue but it to can be corrected. This process could take 1-2 seasons of handling clipboard duty while coaches work with this issue. If Watson had trouble with disguised coverages at the D1 level, imagine his level of surprise when he see's how NFL DC's game plan for him. Don't put a lot of stock into the Pre-Season since he will probably be playing against a lot of the 2nd and 3rd team defenses. DC's will not be showing all their cards during these games.

                  Watson is talented and driven enough to overcome many of his bugs but there is absolutely no sense in rushing him onto the field until he can execute the QB1 position in practice...then Pre-Season...then the regular season.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by ArkhamKnight92 View Post

                    You pretty much have it down. Velocity is really just how quick the ball is moving when it leaves his hand.. But watson throws a clean ball. He anticipates. He puts some heat on it at times. He can lob it at times.. And he can deliver it like a dainty princess when he wants to. A good quarterback should be able to do all of that. There are guys with cannons who have many different problems due to their velocity. Throwing behind receivers is a common one.. Trying to fit them into tight windows because of overconfidence.. Throwing balls high.. Missing timing.. And guys with low velocity have some issues.. But I dont put much weight into velocity. Every throw on the field is different. Every receivers ability to catch is different. Every receiver and tight end has different timing. And from what ive seen.. Watson can make a larger percentage of those throws and adjusments than any other guy coming out. Trubisky looked good as well but in roughly 1/3 as much time as watson and without the winning pedigree. And a lot of quarterbacms fall apart under pressure. Andy dalton comes to mind. But when Deshaun is under pressure.. He seems to get an adrenaline spike and actually get MORE accurate. Thats the kind of thing you cant measure but always love to have. Remember.. Combine is the underwear olympics. Some guys do well throwing high velocity balls when JJ Watt or Joey Bosa aren't coming at them. But Watson throws the necessary ball even under pressure. Can't wait to see this kid in the Preseason. I hope he sits long enough to really get a grasp and isnt rushed out there.. But i think he can handle it in short order.
                    I'm such of a big believer in the "it" factor. You can have all the tangible NFL QB qualities but if don't have "it" you don't have "sh@$". Can't deny he makes things happen...like Brady.

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by dancingbear View Post

                      I'm such of a big believer in the "it" factor. You can have all the tangible NFL QB qualities but if don't have "it" you don't have "sh@$". Can't deny he makes things happen...like Brady.
                      Agreed. Big fan of Watson. Recently read a book called "Grit" by A. Duckworth, and can't help but wonder how we would score on the 'Grit' scale, which tends to predict success in many instances. I think this ball velocity issue is way overblown. I remember a Texans QB who had great arm velocity - Ryan Mallett, but the guy had no anticipation or touch.
                      I like Savage and all, but he doesn't have the presence or intangibles like Watson does. I predict Watson is our starter by years end.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by lrtexasman View Post
                        Pretty simple physics in that the slower the velocity the higher the ball must be thrown with respect to timing. Think of how some QBs throw balls down the hash, to the sidelines, and down the field with either a lot of air or harder lower balls (called frozen ropes). The higher a ball is thrown, the longer it takes to get there, thus giving corners and safeties time to close on the ball.
                        First, there are routes that require the QB to put some air under the ball to drop it in the bucket where ball placement trumps velocity. Colin Kaepernick is a good example of a QB that DBs can defend his "line drive/fastballs" -- flat arc is lower, easier to get a hand on. Drew Brees doesn't have a big arm, but he places the ball properly. Let's exclude those from the velocity debate.



                        Secondly, we have one of the better POA WRs in the game. With Watson's quick release -- assuming quick decision-making -- combined with proper ball placement are much more important than velocity. Jump balls should, in my opinion, be excluded as well.




                        Originally posted by lrtexasman View Post
                        Our offense Erhardt-Perkins with man blocking requires QBs to throw both underneath and to all parts of the route tree, which is why it is so difficult.
                        It's a misnomer to characterize our offense as difficult as it relates to throwing the football. All schemes run similar routes and route combinations. We don't ask our QBs to regularly be accurate deep like ARI or BAL do.

                        As far as throwing the ball, the biggest emphasis our offense requires is accuracy.

                        Originally posted by lrtexasman View Post
                        ...[the] QB has to have the ability to throw into empty space (where receiver ends up). Velocity is a factor, as is anticipation, accuracy, and timing with our offense. I'll be interested to see how Watson compensates for his lack of velocity (as tested) with timing, release, and anticipation. I do think he will be better than anything we have had at anticipating routes and with his release.
                        Agree. Throwing receivers open, throwing with anticipation is key. It's part decision-making -- the difficult part of our offense -- and as you say timing/release and velocity on some throws, but again accuracy is key. As you say, the QB has to throw to an area... a window, and trust his WR gets there. (This has been an issue with DHop -- blown reads -- not frequent, but it persists.)


                        Originally posted by lrtexasman View Post
                        I hope his velocity and accuracy come around...
                        As far as throwing the ball, accuracy (consistent) is more important than velocity.

                        Originally posted by lrtexasman View Post
                        Personally, unless he gets his velocity on deep routes over 55, we won't have a deep game and will have to rely on the run, play action, and underneath routes (think Alex Smith).
                        These are the throws our QB needs to make...



                        Some require velocity -- and velocity matters, 3 feet on a 20 yard throw -- like red zone closing windows...




                        But most of these downs are won between the ears before the snap...




                        All require accuracy -- consistent pinpoint ball placement -- and that will be the measure by which Watson will be judged by as far as throwing the ball, more than 53.5 mph or 56 mph.

                        In 2016 Brock Osweiler was rated last (32nd) among all QBs (>400 attempts) by ProFootballFocus and ranked 33rd/34 QBs (>200 attempts) by Football Outsiders.

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by lrtexasman View Post
                          A quick release helps compensate for the additional height and slower speed QBs with slower velocity have to put on balls. Pretty simple physics in that the slower the velocity the higher the ball must be thrown with respect to timing. Think of how some QBs throw balls down the hash, to the sidelines, and down the field with either a lot of air or harder lower balls (called frozen ropes). The higher a ball is thrown, the longer it takes to get there, thus giving corners and safeties time to close on the ball. QBs with low velocity have a more difficult time preventing interceptions on out-routes and anything over 30 yards. Of course velocity does matter a bit if the QB has poor touch or throws from an awkward angle making underneath throws inaccurate. Mallet, Osweiller, and Kap all struggle with underneath throws due to either a poor arm slot or elongated release points. Simply put, they had poor timing on short routes (due to a longer throwing motion and awkward arm slots). QBs with low velocity are helped by play-action and timing routes, which are some offenses are bread and butter. Our offense is a variation of Erhardt-Perkins with man blocking schemes, which requires QBs to throw both underneath and to all parts of the route tree, and to make run/pass protection calls pre-snap. The routes are conceptual, meaning a QB has to have the ability to throw into empty space (where receiver ends up) based of the read given to him by the defense. Both the receiver and the QB have to be on the same page. Velocity is a factor, as is anticipation, accuracy, and timing with our offense. I'll be interested to see how Watson compensates for his lack of velocity (tested at combine) with timing, release, and anticipation. I do think he will be better than any QB we have had at anticipating (conceptualizing) routes and with the timing of his release. I hope his velocity comes around. I am very confident he will work his rear off and do what is asked of him by OB. I don't think he will leave anything on the field. Whether that's good enough or not, I dont know. He will be the guy that makes or breaks the velocity argument though, because he stacks up above average for all the other measurables. Personally, unless he gets his velocity over 55, we won't have a deep game and will have to rely on the run, play action, and underneath routes (think Alex Smith).
                          Edited to add in dictionary explanation. Equation for Velocity. The equation or formula for velocity is similar to speed. To figure out velocity, you divide the distance by the time it takes to travel that same distance, then you add your direction to it.

                          My suspicion is that a "quick release" is a shortening of the time between when the decision is made until the ball leaves the QB's hand. Thus a QB with a quick release and slower velocity will get the ball to the intended target about the same time. It would also follow that the QB with a quick release and slower exit velocity should not be able to throw it as far. But I haven't heard that complaint, So something doesn't add up.
                          https://tse3.mm.bing.net/th?id=OIP.M...0&h=300Adopter of #98 D. J. Reader

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by Marshall View Post

                            My suspicion is that a "quick release" is a shortening of the time between when the decision is made until the ball leaves the QB's hand. Thus a QB with a quick release and slower velocity will get the ball to the intended target about the same time. It would also follow that the QB with a quick release and slower exit velocity should not be able to throw it as far. But I haven't heard that complaint, So something doesn't add up.
                            Wrong, a fast release can mask a low velocity at times. Other times it can't. To throw into a tight window like H2O4ME posted above of Brady you have to have alot of zip on the ball. If you don't it is going to sail to a degree and that even small difference can be the difference between a catch or an INT depending on how well the WR can adjust to the ball. Hence why you may loft it and drop it into the WRs hands. That helps alot and you tend to see QBs with weaker arms do that more than trying to thread the needle.

                            But, lets just get really basic on the physics.
                            2 cars are about to drag race 1 has 400hp 1 has 700. The 700hp car is 500lbs heavier. If they both start at the same time (assume the drivers are equal) the lighter car with less power will get a jump on the heavier more powerful car. However, once the mass gets moving in the heavier car...it passes the lighter, less powerful car.

                            Whats that mean? Watson has a quick release (the less powerful car with less weight) but he lacks speed on his passes and that (heavier more power car) gives a DB a split second more time to adjust to the ball as much as the WR. This can lead to INTs.

                            Lets look at fact:
                            1- Brady has refined everything about his game over the years and is maybe the best QB ever. Watson is not Brady, and he doesn't have the power Brady has in his throws either. This fits seeing NE runs almost the same system.

                            2- Brady can vary his release for different throws. Many top QBs can. This is not something you can do in 1-2 years it takes rep after rep and time in the gym working on 1 thing...release. Watson may learn it, but for awhile he doesn't have it.

                            3- The system we run requires pretty much every single route in the book. Brady had a good release and arem coming into the NFL. Hence why he was able to do what he did and never stop. Watson doesn't have the arm strength and timing. He can someday perhaps get it, but it will take years.

                            To sum that up, Brady runs a very similar system that he has mastered and he has had from day one under rated ability. He couldn't be scouted like guys are today. Watson has what we know due to the new ways of testing. Fast release and low velocity, unfortunately he doesn't have the same ability to read the D. His INTs came from both timing and poor placement due to the velocity. Can he fix it, yes just how many years will it take for him to get it all working.
                            JJ Watt & Co ready to destroy

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by Matt_in_KW View Post

                              Wrong, a fast release can mask a low velocity at times. Other times it can't. To throw into a tight window like H2O4ME posted above of Brady you have to have alot of zip on the ball. If you don't it is going to sail to a degree and that even small difference can be the difference between a catch or an INT depending on how well the WR can adjust to the ball. Hence why you may loft it and drop it into the WRs hands. That helps alot and you tend to see QBs with weaker arms do that more than trying to thread the needle.

                              But, lets just get really basic on the physics.
                              2 cars are about to drag race 1 has 400hp 1 has 700. The 700hp car is 500lbs heavier. If they both start at the same time (assume the drivers are equal) the lighter car with less power will get a jump on the heavier more powerful car. However, once the mass gets moving in the heavier car...it passes the lighter, less powerful car.

                              Whats that mean? Watson has a quick release (the less powerful car with less weight) but he lacks speed on his passes and that (heavier more power car) gives a DB a split second more time to adjust to the ball as much as the WR. This can lead to INTs.

                              Lets look at fact:
                              1- Brady has refined everything about his game over the years and is maybe the best QB ever. Watson is not Brady, and he doesn't have the power Brady has in his throws either. This fits seeing NE runs almost the same system.

                              2- Brady can vary his release for different throws. Many top QBs can. This is not something you can do in 1-2 years it takes rep after rep and time in the gym working on 1 thing...release. Watson may learn it, but for awhile he doesn't have it.

                              3- The system we run requires pretty much every single route in the book. Brady had a good release and arem coming into the NFL. Hence why he was able to do what he did and never stop. Watson doesn't have the arm strength and timing. He can someday perhaps get it, but it will take years.

                              To sum that up, Brady runs a very similar system that he has mastered and he has had from day one under rated ability. He couldn't be scouted like guys are today. Watson has what we know due to the new ways of testing. Fast release and low velocity, unfortunately he doesn't have the same ability to read the D. His INTs came from both timing and poor placement due to the velocity. Can he fix it, yes just how many years will it take for him to get it all working.
                              it's like you do zero research before posting anything on here Matt

                              First All of brady's scouting reports coming out said he had a weak arm. which he did, it wasn't as strong as it is today. Strength is something you can build, and I guarantee if they took his velocity at the combine it wouldn't have hit the 55 mph threshold.
                              http://www.foxsports.com/buzzer/stor...-report-030317

                              Also if you have watched any of Watsons tape you know he can change his throws, like many other good qbs do. However I don't expect you to watch or comprehend them so here is another link for you to read in which it states he has a full inventory of throws
                              https://www.profootballfocus.com/dra...on-qb-clemson/
                              sigpic

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by shishkabob View Post

                                it's like you do zero research before posting anything on here Matt

                                First All of brady's scouting reports coming out said he had a weak arm. which he did, it wasn't as strong as it is today. Strength is something you can build, and I guarantee if they took his velocity at the combine it wouldn't have hit the 55 mph threshold.
                                http://www.foxsports.com/buzzer/stor...-report-030317

                                Also if you have watched any of Watsons tape you know he can change his throws, like many other good qbs do. However I don't expect you to watch or comprehend them so here is another link for you to read in which it states he has a full inventory of throws
                                https://www.profootballfocus.com/dra...on-qb-clemson/
                                I agree, and it seems like he missed the entire point of H204MEs breakdown..

                                Those were highlights of accurate, well placed touch passes with anticipation, not rocket passes going into a tight window where the receiver is covered.

                                "Lets look at the facts"

                                1) A quick release means DBs have less time to queue up on a long drawn out wind up. Decreasing their total time to react. He's not Jameis Winston, who threw a 55mph ball but has an extremely slow wind up.

                                2) A quick release also means the ball has less time to be knocked away during the wind up by defenders closing the pocket.
                                Last edited by SteelBluCurtain; 6 days ago.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X