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  • #31
    Originally posted by H2O4me View Post
    Texans' pick D'Onta Foreman has stress fracture in foot

    So Foreman has a Jones Fracture? I missed this diagnosis. Not the smartest idea to draft a big RB with one or two repair surgeries on his horizon. This is same injury that Kevin Johnson required two surgeries for.
    Ian Rapoport‏ @RapSheet Apr 29
    #Texans do not believe RB D’Onta Foreman (stress fracture) needs surgery, source said. They found no progressions in the injury at rechecks

    Doc's take...
    D'Onta Foreman was held out of the Combine activities with what was discovered during medical exam as a "slight stress fracture of the foot." Although he was not aware of it, it nonetheless makes it a worrisome injury. The name "stress fracture" in itself seems like a minor fracture, although they can carry some of the same risks as a complete fracture.....and certainly can extend to one quickly in the future.

    Jones fractures can temporarily hold up through relatively short period of playing on them, but will invariably require surgery. In an elite athlete, non surgical treatment is seldom ever pursued......especially when it comes to a large powerful RB who pushes off hard every play. I doubt that I have to bring up the plight of other elite NFL players which were blessed the likes of this injury.............i.e., Dez Bryant, Julian Edelman, Julio Jones, Sammy Watkins, Demarcus Lawrence, Marvin Jones.............
    After proper treatment - as in not 'playing through it' - didn't most of these guys return to form??
    Pretty much so............except as not uncommonly occurs, they required 2 widely staggered operations and significant loss of playing time to get to that point........just like our very own Kevin Johnson.

    The first surgery requires the placement of a screw, the second usually requires the placement of a larger screw with bone grafting to stabilize the fracture site. Each of these surgeries require an 8-12 week rehab. In the case of a 300+ pounder, the post surgical course becomes less predictable, as does the long term effect on performance/career.
    We'll see how it plays out.

    There is a possibility it's the 2nd metatarsal, and that would have a much better chance of healing on its own that the 5th.
    Last edited by H2O4me; 05-04-2017, 12:34 PM.
    If you're not following the Astros, you are doing Houston sports wrong.

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    • #32
      Texans rookie D'Onta Foreman ready to make immediate impact

      By Aaron Wilson
      Running with power, explosiveness and an instinctive, creative style, running back Ezekiel Elliott left a colorful stamp on the Dallas Cowboys' breakthrough year during his rookie season last year.

      The Pro Bowl running back was simply dominant, rushing for 1,631 yards and 15 touchdowns as the Cowboys won the NFC East division title.

      Hours away in Austin, the impact Elliott made didn't escape the attention of D'Onta Foreman during his star turn at the University of Texas last fall. As the Doak Walker award winner led the nation with 2,028 rushing yards before declaring early for the NFL draft, the Texas City native set his own ambitions for his rookie campaign.

      Now, the Texans' third-round draft pick is determined to prove himself and find success during his first professional season. Unlike Elliott, Foreman isn't walking into a starting job as he'll work in tandem with veteran runner and Pro Bowl alternate Lamar Miller.

      "It's definitely encouraging, just seeing those guys go out there and compete at a high level early," Foreman said during the Texans' rookie minicamp. "It's something to strive for, definitely, but I just want to go out there and do what I'm asked to do.

      "I think that's the biggest thing, is just learn the playbook. If you don't know the playbook you can't go out there and be on the field."

      Despite his collegiate success and combination of size, strength and 4.45 speed in the 40-yard dash, the 6-0, 233-pound Foreman watched as seven running backs were drafted ahead of him this spring.

      That included first-round picks Leonard Fournette (Jacksonville Jaguars) and Christian McCaffrey (Carolina Panthers), second-round picks Dalvin Cook (Minnesota Vikings) and Joe Mixon (Cincinnati Bengals) and third-round selections Alvin Kamara (New Orleans Saints) and Kareem Hunt (Kansas City Chiefs).

      All of it fuels his determination, and Foreman has a history of proving people wrong. When recruiters, including former Texas coach Mack Brown, paid more attention to his twin brother, Armanti, Foreman used that as significant motivational material.

      He proved he could shoulder a heavy workload as a workhorse back last season, carrying the football 323 times and averaging an impressive 6.3 yards per carry.

      "It helps a lot," Foreman said. "Just being able to run the ball and carry a load like that, I feel like at any time I'm ready to step on the field and be productive whenever they call my number."

      Foreman has some work to do to achieve that status.

      Beyond competing for playing time behind Miller, Foreman has to get into optimal condition. Texans coach Bill O'Brien noted that Foreman and other rookies have some work to do to get into ideal football shape. Foreman worked on the side during practice Saturday, riding a stationary exercise bike.

      Foreman was listed at 249 pounds last season at Texas, but is now listed 16 pounds lighter.

      "As far as like conditioning, we just all have to go out there and just keep working hard, just keep doing what they ask us to do," Foreman said. "Like coach O'Brien said, we were doing a lot of combine stuff, so just getting in the shape of football and getting back into the routine of football, all of that will come."

      Foreman has impressive leg drive, vision and athleticism. He has a lot of wiggle in the open field for such a big man, reminding former Dallas Cowboys general manager Gil Brandt of Pittsburgh Steelers Hall of Fame running back Jerome Bettis.

      "I told D'Onta he can be the next Jerome Bettis," Brandt said. "He looked awfully good last season. He's a great runner."

      Whether Foreman can provide a receiving threat out of the backfield remains to be seen.

      In three seasons for the Longhorns, Foreman was seldom utilized as a receiver out of the backfield. He finished with 13 career receptions for 146 yards and no scores, including a career-high seven receptions for 75 yards last season.

      "I feel great about my skills catching the ball," Foreman said. "We just didn't do it a lot at Texas, but I'm very confident in the way I catch the ball and I'm just ready to go out there and show it."
      The Texans are excited about Foreman, who ran for 15 touchdowns last season and won the Earl Campbell Tyler Rose award.

      "We saw a guy who's got good size, very productive," Texans coach Bill O'Brien said. "Inside runner, outside runner, has got decent hands out of the backfield. We saw some good things."

      Foreman fumbled seven times and lost six of them last season. The ball-security issue is explainable: Foreman played through a broken hand, his pinkie finger specifically, last season.
      Foreman said that he's now 100 percent recovered from the hand injury.

      He wasn't allowed to work out at the NFL scouting combine due to a stress fracture in his foot. Foreman has previously acknowledged that the hand injury hindered his ball security.

      "Just carry it high and tight in traffic, put two hands on the ball, the things they teach us," Foreman said. "At Texas, I ran the ball a lot. I'm not a type to make excuses for me putting the ball on the ground, just focusing more on keeping it high and tight and putting two hands on it in traffic."

      An intangible that drew the Texans toward Foreman was when he decided to participate in their annual local prospect day even though he wasn't required to and was already assured of being drafted fairly high.

      Surrounded by a collection of players who would go undrafted, Foreman was intent on making a good impression on O'Brien, general manager Rick Smith and running backs coach Charles London.

      "For one, I'm a competitor.," Foreman said. "I like to compete. When I get a chance to compete I want to do that and I want to show what I can do. It was the draft process, something that you just want to take advantage of every opportunity that you have.

      "Just me growing up watching the Texans, this is a place that I really wanted to be a part of, so it was like a no-brainer. When they asked me, I was like, 'Let's do it. Let's go for it and just go out there and compete and work hard.'"
      If you're not following the Astros, you are doing Houston sports wrong.

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      • #33
        Foreman has been talking to a true icon of Houston football. Article on FanSided about him and Earl!

        Hope he takes every word and writes it down. He has the ability to be similar. He just needs to run over more people and not cut away.


        'D'Onta Foreman talking to Earl Campbell'
        http://torotimes.com/2017/05/15/hous...earl-campbell/
        JJ Watt & Co ready to destroy

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Matt_in_KW View Post
          Foreman has been talking to a true icon of Houston football. Article on FanSided about him and Earl!

          Hope he takes every word and writes it down. He has the ability to be similar. He just needs to run over more people and not cut away.


          'D'Onta Foreman talking to Earl Campbell'
          http://torotimes.com/2017/05/15/hous...earl-campbell/
          Nobody, I mean NOBODY can ever equal Earl. Those 36" thighs are exceeded only by the women at my bar. Dude walks on water.

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          • #35
            Does anyone else see similarities to Le'veon Bell coming out of college?

            All I heard about Bell the year he was drafted was that he's a big back that's light on his feet and sometimes shy's away from contact.

            from Bleacher Report: Le'veon Bell Scouting Report

            Occasionally he dances around too much, trying to make people miss when he should put his nose down and grind out a few yards. At roughly 240 pounds, that can be a very frustrating quality.
            Last edited by SteelBluCurtain; 05-16-2017, 11:46 AM.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by dancingbear View Post

              Nobody, I mean NOBODY can ever equal Earl. Those 36" thighs are exceeded only by the women at my bar. Dude walks on water.
              Your preaching to the choir there. I watched him in High School (my parents were also Tyler John Tyler graduates). I watched him in college. And I watched him in the Pros. He was talented and had class on the field and a warm heart off the field.
              https://tse3.mm.bing.net/th?id=OIP.M...0&h=300Adopter of #98 D. J. Reader

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              • #37
                Originally posted by SteelBluCurtain View Post
                Does anyone else see similarities to Le'veon Bell coming out of college?

                All I heard about Bell the year he was drafted was that he's a big back that's light on his feet and sometimes shy's away from contact.

                from Bleacher Report: Le'veon Bell Scouting Report

                Bell was 240 at MSU and dropped to 225 in the pros, now he's the best back in the league.

                Foreman is 240-250 with more speed than Bell. If he drops to 225, who knows.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by AngryNateFTW View Post

                  Bell was 240 at MSU and dropped to 225 in the pros, now he's the best back in the league.

                  Foreman is 240-250 with more speed than Bell. If he drops to 225, who knows.
                  Bell I think is faster but besides that and weight I do see a similar situation IF he dropped weight or can play at 240-ish. Big guy that will cut before he even thinks about running someone over.
                  JJ Watt & Co ready to destroy

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Matt_in_KW View Post

                    Bell I think is faster but besides that and weight I do see a similar situation IF he dropped weight or can play at 240-ish. Big guy that will cut before he even thinks about running someone over.
                    That is a difference from Earl. Earl looked for people to run over, not around.
                    https://tse3.mm.bing.net/th?id=OIP.M...0&h=300Adopter of #98 D. J. Reader

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by AngryNateFTW View Post
                      Bell was 240 at MSU and dropped to 225 in the pros, now he's the best back in the league.
                      And Bell has WR hands, they split him out and he wins as a WR.

                      And Bell does a lot of stop start read/react moves at the line creating holes.

                      D'Onta is more of a one speed hit the hole guy to me. But once he gets through, he's got better run away speed. Needs to learn pass pro and work on ball security.


                      Originally posted by Marshall View Post

                      That is a difference from Earl. Earl looked for people to run over, not around.
                      Nobody delivered blows like Earl.
                      If you're not following the Astros, you are doing Houston sports wrong.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Marshall View Post

                        Your preaching to the choir there. I watched him in High School (my parents were also Tyler John Tyler graduates). I watched him in college. And I watched him in the Pros. He was talented and had class on the field and a warm heart off the field.
                        unfortunately I wasn't around yet to see Earl play live, but I have watched a ton of football including games before my time, and Earl is still my favorite rb of all time.
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                        • #42
                          The Eyeball Test: Scouting The Texans’ 2017 Draft Class
                          by Matt Weston/BattleRedBlog
                          D’Onta Foreman

                          Like Cunningham, Foreman is a talented player who immediately fits a need. Houston has needed a viable backup running back since Ben Tate in 2013. Because Alfred Blue isn’t good and Bill O’Brien’s blood oath to run the ball forty times a game, Lamar Miller carried the ball 268 times in 14 games last season. This was 52 more than the most Miller had in a full season. This makes a man who is great in space, running wide and outside on outside zone carries, became a slightly better version of Alfred Blue—a beige, inefficient, three yard up the middle plodder who saw his talents squandered in an offense that didn’t match his skill set.

                          That was last year. This year, that should change—hopefully. Bill O’Brien has already admitted his faults for forcing Miller to incessantly be battered in the box. Now it already looks like Houston has a capable running back who can seize ten to fifteen carries a week, allow Miller to breathe longer on the sideline, and not be stuck following listless Jeff Allen pulls on the path to nowhere.

                          Foreman is not elusive. He doesn’t make people miss. What he does is use patience to set up blocks, vision to find holes to absorb every yard his offensive line gives him, and then get a bit more thanks to an enormous rumbling body that always carries him forward. Houston can employ Foremen on simple lead plays and inside runs instead of wasting Miller’s energy, grace, and beauty on inside pile ups. Using Foreman to spell Miller in these instances will soak up more yards in the process.

                          This is a basic lead play on second and eight. Once Foreman takes in the hand-off, he looks inside to outside and back inside. On the outside is an unblocked linebacker. Any bounce out that would become a foot race isn’t an option here. So Foreman plows ahead. He waits for his fullback. Once contact is made, Foreman bursts forward. His pad level is low the entire time, creating strength and leverage, and leads to the two extra yards he gets when he falls forward to the Earth.



                          This is how Foreman helps Houston on a basic level immediately. He’ll keep Miller fresh, and he’ll be better at running plays that don’t align with Miller’s skills. Now a lot of bodies out there can run four yards and fall forward for two more. You don’t use a third round pick on that. Why the Texans’ used a third round pick on Foreman is because he’s a complex and complete runner with the ability to do much more than dive forward through time.

                          Below, the University of Texas is running an inside zone play. Instantly, an interior defensive lineman breaks through the line. Foremen reads the line right to left with an unblocked defender on the left edge. He sees this and slightly cuts to the left. After a bit of a gallop, he lowers his legs and bursts ahead. His speed leads to contact with the unblocked linemen into his side rather than head on. With a monster around him, he cuts right and leaps over a diving safety for the first down.



                          This combination of footwork, vision, and burst allows Foreman to manufacture yards without having to break tackles. Here the offense is running a power variation where the guard pulls around the tackle to the outside. Like the previous play, there’s seepage right away. Foreman, trying to follow the guard, is forced to come to a complete stop. He nibbles with his feet. Then he cuts to the left and feels only a draft. From there he shoots forward past two tacklers and carries the safety head on for more.



                          Foreman is more than a brutish power back. He’s a smart and disciplined runner who is as patient as a wildlife photographer while he waits for his blockers. When he gets this carry, he has two linemen running right and there’s muck in front of him. He hugs the ball with both arms and hits the breaks. He waits for the left tackle to finish his down block carrying the defender inside, and he waits for his puller to kick out the linebacker. Once this happens, Foreman comes flat off the first puller’s back and accelerates, running as fast as he can until he runs too fast and topples over.



                          When Foremen gets past the second level and has to make defenders miss, he has trouble. That body isn’t meant to wiggle around others. He moves well, but he’s not going to make someone miss who’s sitting in the hole unblocked. His stutters and stops won’t work on free roaming linebackers.



                          What Foreman does well though is go through people. After accelerating to peak speed, he’ll punish and go through defenders to grab every blade of grass available. You’ll pray for defenders who are forced to tackle him one-on-one as he gallops into lower shouldered wallops.




                          One of the reasons why Foreman’s running style works so well around the line of scrimmage is his pad level. He’s always running low to the ground, filled with leverage and power. He flips on a magnetic field turning tackles into bounce-offs. He’s low through the first level before raising up to hit top speed and break through the second and third levels.



                          Foreman is going to play a lot on first and second down. He’s going to run through fields of shrunken heads and chewed up limbs sticking through the fence by running low, setting up blocks, cutting back, and raising up to accelerate until he falls forward for extra yards. What he’s not going to do is be a primary back that’s going to play on third down. He doesn’t have the skill set in the passing game. He’s not going to get open. He doesn’t understand pass protection and isn’t very good at sticking blockers head on when he does make the correct read.



                          Foreman is here on early downs to take carries out of Miller’s mouth and to wear down defenses with a physical style that is so much more than that. Foreman fills a need. He is a perfect combination of talent and fit for the Texans.
                          If you're not following the Astros, you are doing Houston sports wrong.

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                          • #43
                            Im so surprised nobody in the media is talking about this young man.
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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by Texanballer View Post
                              Im so surprised nobody in the media is talking about this young man.
                              Everyone talks about how amazing watsons story is.. What about what Foreman has gone through..
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                              • #45
                                Originally posted by ArkhamKnight92 View Post

                                Everyone talks about how amazing watsons story is.. What about what Foreman has gone through..
                                No doubt!
                                Want to learn everything about the Texans cap? There is no better site out there than this one. Thanks Troy. Amazing work buddy!
                                TexansCap.com

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