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Welcome Julién Davenport, OT

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  • #16

    Mark Berman @MarkBermanFox26
    OT Julien Davenport from Bucknell, Texans 4th-round pick agrees to 4-year deal.
    In 2016 Brock Osweiler was rated last (32nd) among all QBs (>400 attempts) by ProFootballFocus and ranked 33rd/34 QBs (>200 attempts) by Football Outsiders.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by jkeener71 View Post
      Little late but I thought we drafted a Julie, not that it matters. HAHA
      Julie and Dave in the port, Sounds like a John cougar Mellencamp song.
      Want to learn everything about the Texans cap? There is no better site out there than this one. Thanks Troy. Amazing work buddy!
      TexansCap.com

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Yosarian View Post

        Julie and Dave in the port, Sounds like a John cougar Mellencamp song.
        A little ditty?

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        • #19
          Apparently everybody misspells and mispronounces his name...
          The first time we meet, Davenport tells me his first name is pronounced Julie-own, with a French inflection on the second syllable. In the three days I spend with him. every single person we meet calls him Juli-en, the way you'd pronounce "Julian." He never once corrects anybody.

          Same goes for the spelling.

          Someone at some point decided Julién should be spelled Julie'n. Davenport doesn't know who or why. You'll find this spelling all over the internet, even on Bucknell's official website. Again, he plans no corrections.

          "I didn't make it a big deal," Davenport said "Just let it ride. [I] thought maybe their software couldn't put the accent mark over the e."
          In 2016 Brock Osweiler was rated last (32nd) among all QBs (>400 attempts) by ProFootballFocus and ranked 33rd/34 QBs (>200 attempts) by Football Outsiders.

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          • #20
            The Eyeball Test: Scouting The Texans’ 2017 Draft Class (Part II)

            Matt Weston does this thing that he does every year, review the Texans’ latest draft class

            by Matt Weston/BattleRedBlog
            Julién Davenport

            Some of us have the brain and body meant to do certain things. Davenport was put on this planet not to live a meaningful or enriching life, or to write poetry about the waxy corsage that’s the exterior of the cacti’s yellow flower, or to work in customer service for AT&T and never do what I need him to do. No, Davenport’s clay was given breath so he could pass block and grab things off the top shelf at the grocery store for the tiny and wrinkled.

            The easy thing to say and and write about Davenport is to say and write that he’s a project. He went to Bucknell, a onetime #14 seed beating #3 seed Cinderella in the NCAA Tournament, that few even know has a football program. He played against teams like Georgetown and VMI. He’s really tall. Because of these things, he’s rough and ragged. He needs time to nurture and grow.

            This is an easy cliche. A bland thing no one can argue against. You know, Davenport probably will need time to get acclimated to play against J.J. Watt and Jadeveon Clowney instead of 5’10” defensive ends whose fathers owned a car dealership. I am here to say that I think Davenport is much closer to being a starting quality offensive tackle than what the usual suspects are telling you.

            Here Davenport is in a two-point stance at left tackle. He snaps out of it like a cobra. He’s back on his heels, and his head is back. He’s anchored well. Kick-sliding is a strange movement. Nobody ever moves like that for practical purposes. It serves no use for anything other than football. Yet Davenport is a natural kick-slider. He has good lateral quickness and keeps a wide base. Most importantly, he’s quick. The defensive end is beaten to the contact point. Instead of sticking into Davenport, he delays the inevitable and tries to get farther outside. This forces the tackle to turn his shoulders. Despite that, Davenport is able to stay strong. He punches the chest and holds on.



            Davenport shows excellent quickness and movement out of a three-point stance, too. He can pass protect either way, unlike most millennial offensive linemen who have been ruined by coddled schemes. He’s up and out of there. He strikes the chest and runs the end past the quarterback.



            Additionally, Davenport has a good understanding of blitz pickup. Stunts don’t confuse him, leaving him lost and aimless. He blocks the correct man on almost every play, and he knows how to provide help before his man comes into contact with him. Before the play, he flashes to signal to the running back there’s outside pressure. The line is sliding one gap over to the left. Davenport has the edge. As he kick-slides wide, he uses his right arm to help the guard. By staying close to the guard, it limits the amount of space between the two, which closes off a path for the blitzer. The inside rusher is blocked with his body indirectly while he keeps his eyes on his assignment. When contact is made, he’s in good position, low and strong, and he walls off the edge rusher.



            As good as Davenport’s feet are, his hands are the best part of his game. He uses his long arms to extend defenders off his body. He always punches and grabs the chest, turning the defender into a steering wheel and manipulating him however he wants to. In the run game, his hands and punch keep him stuck to blocks, and they prevent the defender from running off and away.

            On this play, he takes three perfect short staccato steps. He’s directly in front of the end. When he punches, he uses his right arm to try and turn the end away from the play. It doesn’t work. But when he goes to escape, Davenport brings his hands back inside and places them back on the chest. The end is stuck and can’t make an impact at all.



            This is another example of the same thing. Great steps, great punch, and great hands. Olive Garden.



            Davenport’s feet are also just as good in the run game as they are in the pass game. Here Bucknell is running a play-action pass they are blocking like the outside zone. Davenport takes a perfect read step, gaining ground and depth at the same time. He gets his head on the outside shoulder of a smaller, quicker player, which is so hard to do. From there, he puts his hands on the numbers and sits.



            His feet allow him to hit his landmarks and put him where he needs to be. They also make him a good second level blocker. The key to the second level isn’t driving blocks and hotcake flipping. It’s about making contact and sticking to the block. Davenport does exactly that. On this beautiful play, Davenport goes directly to the second level while the fullback pulls against the grain to cover the edge defender. At the second level, Davenport hits the confused linebacker head on and stays on the block.



            We all have problems, things we can get better at and improve upon. Davenport isn’t mean enough in the run game. He doesn’t consistently drive the first level and beat up on defenders. His blocks are technical and nice, but football is a violent sport based on collisions, and Davenport doesn’t create enough of them. On this deuce block, he creates movement when he hits the defensive end. Afterwards, he drives to the next level. When he gets there, he catches the defender, holds him, and gets in the way. He’s not out to ruin days or disintegrate bones like flood water. He just moves well and stands in the way.



            The other problem is that Davenport plays high. How much of this is an optical illusion—like that beautiful young woman who is also a witch—because of the difference in size between him and his competition, I don’t know. But I do know he can be better at bending his hips and playing low.

            Here, his feet are great. His hands are great. He’s in a perfect position. After he makes contact he explodes up. He doesn’t drop back down. He’s standing straight up and gets driven back. He’s able to recover and move the defender because his hands and feet are so good.



            Because of what I read after the draft, I am shocked by how good of a player Davenport already is. I expected a big, tall oaf who doesn’t know how to play the game. Davenport is already technically sound. His hands, feet, movement, and size are all NFL-ready. The only question I have is how difficult it’s going to be to go from blocking small, limited athletes to some of the biggest, strongest creatures on this marble. If Davenport can handle the speed of the pro game, and I think he can, Davenport could compete for the starting right tackle spot on the Texans’ line this season, and he could one day be Duane Brown’s replacement on the left side. Davenport is a legitimate player.

            This is I think the most positive tape review of Davenport I've seen anywhere. Makes me look forward to watching him.
            In 2016 Brock Osweiler was rated last (32nd) among all QBs (>400 attempts) by ProFootballFocus and ranked 33rd/34 QBs (>200 attempts) by Football Outsiders.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by jkeener71 View Post

              A little ditty?
              lol yes. haha
              Want to learn everything about the Texans cap? There is no better site out there than this one. Thanks Troy. Amazing work buddy!
              TexansCap.com

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by H2O4me View Post
                The Eyeball Test: Scouting The Texans’ 2017 Draft Class (Part II)

                Matt Weston does this thing that he does every year, review the Texans’ latest draft class

                by Matt Weston/BattleRedBlog



                This is I think the most positive tape review of Davenport I've seen anywhere. Makes me look forward to watching him.
                Great write up, the only problem is level of competition. We have seen enough tape to know that he can play OT, we just don't know at what level, though.

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                • #23
                  Nate we have seen a lot of players who didn't play for big name schools be very successful in the NFL. And we've seen plenty of players who played for big time schools indeed up being a bust. So lets not put so much stock in the different levels of competitions.
                  sigpic

                  Bleeds Texans Blue Red and White Blood.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Texanballer View Post
                    Nate we have seen a lot of players who didn't play for big name schools be very successful in the NFL. And we've seen plenty of players who played for big time schools indeed up being a bust. So lets not put so much stock in the different levels of competitions.
                    It wasn't meant to sound like I'm not excited about his potential. We know he has the size, the athleticism, and the smarts, we just need to see him put it all together against the kind of competition he will be seeing every snap in the NFL.

                    Training Camp vs Watt/Clowney/Mercilus, and maybe vs some of the big boys will be a great learning curve for him. If he can hold his own vs them, he has a chance to be a good one.

                    Would be a steal in the 4th.

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